Author Topic: workshop planning software  (Read 1083 times)

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Offline HowardH

  • Posts: 1394
workshop planning software
« on: June 19, 2022, 11:35 PM »
We recently bought an acre of land and will be building a house on it after the first of the year.  I want to build a real dream shop - 25x50 of which about 12' off of one end will be walled off for my home office.  That's going to leave a lot of space for some fun. Grizzly doesn't offer their layout software anymore as they are working on a replacement. Anyone else offering something like that? I'd like to be able to layout my big iron as well as where my sysports, etc need to go.  Also, would be a good idea to build a small area on the outside to hold my full size DC and then run the pipe through the wall?  It's a Felder AF14 and it's pretty loud.  Would love to see some pics of what others have done.  What worked, what would you do different.
Howard H
The Dallas Texas Festool Fanatic!

Mark Twain:  "I didn't attend the funeral, but I sent a letter approving of it." "If you tell the truth you don't have to remember anything."

mft1080, P1cc, MFT/3, T15, TID-18, RO150FEQ, ETS EC 150, MT55cc, RTS400, CT22, CT36E, 800, 1080, 1400, 1900 rails, OF 2200, OF1400, CSX, C18, VacSys, Vecturo, Domino, Qwas dogs, Parf Dogs, Zobo's, Syslite Uni, CMS GE, Sawstop contractor, PM 1500, Shaper Origin. Felder AF-14

Offline rvieceli

  • Posts: 1733
Re: workshop planning software
« Reply #1 on: June 20, 2022, 06:41 AM »
You could probably use sketchup or go old school and use graph paper and paper cut out for your stuff.

Unless you are restricted by property requirements I'd suggest going bigger if you can, at least 30 wide. 25 sounds like a lot but it gets small pretty quick.

Don't forget you'll also need a lot of space for storage, tools, consumable wood etc. A lot of time that means a 2 foot space around the perimeter to accommodate those things.

Don't forget height as well, I have 9 foot ceilings, 10 would be better.

I'd suggest heading over to the Garage Journal Forums and joining   https://www.garagejournal.com/forum/  There are a significant number of well documented shop builds. Don't be put off by the fact that many of them are machine shop or auto centric, the builds are just spaces and can be configured for anything. The folks over there are very helpful and I think you will find a lot of ideas for your project.

As far as you dust collection, many folks will stick a small kick out on the side that can accommodate the DC and the compressor.

Ron

Offline guybo

  • Posts: 382
Re: workshop planning software
« Reply #2 on: June 20, 2022, 09:58 AM »

Offline twistsol1

  • Posts: 19
    • Sawdustzone
Re: workshop planning software
« Reply #3 on: June 20, 2022, 11:10 AM »
I've used Visio and a set of woodshop tool shapes developed by Harvey Chute. It's two dimensional but works for a quick layout.

The template can be found here.
https://www.sawdustzone.org/forum/discussions/shop-setup-layout-and-design/846364-shop-layout-programs
A shop full of tools and no talent

Offline jobsworth

  • Posts: 6895
  • Festool Baby.....
Re: workshop planning software
« Reply #4 on: June 21, 2022, 02:39 PM »
I did a complete thread, on moving my shop from Calif to Az and had a shop built from the ground up. Do a search it covers everything from getting the architect contractor , issues during the build (it was during the pandemic) and other things including building cabinets and setting it up.  Basically womb to tomb from moving building and setting my shop up.

https://www.festoolownersgroup.com/workshops-and-mobile-vehicle-based-shops/whats-a-good-shop-size/
« Last Edit: June 21, 2022, 02:45 PM by jobsworth »

Offline HowardH

  • Posts: 1394
Re: workshop planning software
« Reply #5 on: June 21, 2022, 03:07 PM »
Thanks!  I'll review...
Howard H
The Dallas Texas Festool Fanatic!

Mark Twain:  "I didn't attend the funeral, but I sent a letter approving of it." "If you tell the truth you don't have to remember anything."

mft1080, P1cc, MFT/3, T15, TID-18, RO150FEQ, ETS EC 150, MT55cc, RTS400, CT22, CT36E, 800, 1080, 1400, 1900 rails, OF 2200, OF1400, CSX, C18, VacSys, Vecturo, Domino, Qwas dogs, Parf Dogs, Zobo's, Syslite Uni, CMS GE, Sawstop contractor, PM 1500, Shaper Origin. Felder AF-14

Online Bob D.

  • Retailer
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  • Posts: 2849
    • My Cordless Workshop
Re: workshop planning software
« Reply #6 on: June 21, 2022, 03:28 PM »
If you know a little SketchUp maybe this series will help.

« Last Edit: June 21, 2022, 03:32 PM by Bob D. »
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It's a table saw, do you know where your fingers are?

Offline mino

  • Posts: 1020
Re: workshop planning software
« Reply #7 on: June 22, 2022, 08:10 AM »
For simple 2D modelling Libreoffice Draw is hard to beat (aka better than Visio for this task).

What I do is use Draw for "figuring it out" as modeling idea changes of the "let the boxes move" type are very fast/easy.
I would set page size to the rectangle dimensions of the room/house etc. /in 1:10 or 1:100 ratio/ and use that as "natural" boundaries when placing stuff.
I do a 3D model /where necessary/ only once I got the general idea of "what should be where" figured out.

On a general note:
 - start with a workflow, place tools around it, then bound it with walls. Not the other way. It will lead you to more of a rectanglular-ish floorplan than a square one ...
 - try not to afix assumed tool placement, something along "positions" where you would place tools as you see fit at a given time will serve you well, nothing worse than not being able to move something that starts bothering you
 - include proper material storage place in the workflow e.g. sheet goods storage at some garage-like entrance is golden etc.
When The Machine has no brains, use yours.

Offline MikeGE

  • Posts: 366
Re: workshop planning software
« Reply #8 on: June 22, 2022, 10:54 AM »
I used SketchUp Make 2017 (the free version) to model my shop a few years ago.  I had a good idea of what I wanted to put in the shop, but was not sure if everything would fit.  The Trimble 3D Warehouse had files for some of the equipment I had, or versions that was close enough.  I had to create a model for my Minimax SC2C saw, the dust collection ducting, and the filter plenum for the DC system.  I found the 3D SketchUp files for the DeWalt DWS780 miter saw, Jet JSG-96 sander, Sjöbergs work bench, as well as generic table top drill press, compressor, band saw, and a jointer/planer.  I imported my mitersaw workstation file to complete the shop layout.

I put my DC and compressor in a closet, but could have made the closet a bit larger.  This is a rendering of the fitted out shop with some of the ducting and overhead obstructions removed for clarity.




Being able to model the shop first was a great help, and it was easy enough to do in SketchUp.

Since the design and build, I made some changes to the ducting and mitersaw station, added a Record Power AC400 air filter, and replaced the DWS780 with a Kapex 120.  This is what my shop looked like before I expanded into the adjacent room.  I moved the Sjöbergs bench, drill press, and tool wall into the other room.  Aside from the Kapex, which is connected to a dedicated CTL-36, only the equipment that needs to be connected to the large DC system is in this room.




Offline smorgasbord

  • Posts: 76
Re: workshop planning software
« Reply #9 on: June 22, 2022, 07:52 PM »
Just a note that it pays to model the raw stock with which you typically work. If you work with 4x8 sheets of plywood, model that and see how it fits on MFTs, or how it moves over tablesaws. I setup my shop years ago to handle building doors, crown molding, and all sorts of cabinets and furniture out of solid wood, and modeling that ended up being key to handling 16' long pieces of stock.

I cringe when I see chopsaws/mitersaws with less than 8' of room on at least one side.

Offline Rich M.

  • Posts: 17
Re: workshop planning software
« Reply #10 on: June 25, 2022, 02:01 PM »
- Another vote for SketchUp here. Modeling my shop was a great way to become more proficient in using the software. There’s a ton of videos online to help you with SketchUp.
- As others here have mentioned, SketchUp 3D-Warehouse has many prebuilt objects you can drop into your model.  I found most of my woodworking machines (or close dimensions to) already built in 3D-Warehouse.
- @smorgasbord and others make a great point:  also model your workflow, sheet goods movement , etc.
- Once you get comfortable with modeling software, you’ll likely use it for lots of things.  I am currently helping some family members design a bathroom remodel, again with generic components from 3D-Warehouse.
- Keep in mind future changes.  If your equipment is on mobile bases, work tables on casters, etc., it will make the inevitable ‘shop redesign’ so much easier.
Good luck with your shop.    Rich M. in Denver.