Author Topic: Workshop heat  (Read 7673 times)

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Offline Wooden Skye

  • Posts: 1173
  • My little girl was called home 12-28-15
Workshop heat
« on: February 17, 2013, 03:10 PM »
I have used a space heater for my shop (10'x16'), however it isn't the best option.  Towards the end of the year we are going to put an addition on, and I will have a more permanent solution for heating and cooling.  In the meantime, I was thinking about using an electric stove/fireplace.  Any thoughts on if this would be good/safe or has anybody used to heat their shop.
Bryan

TS 55, (2) 1400 Guide Rails, 1900 Guide Rail, MFT/3, Domino ETS 150/3, RO 90, CT 26, OF1400, RO 150. RTS 400, LR 32 set, PS300 jigsaw, 3 abrasive systainers, (2) sys toolbox, (2) sys mini, clamps and other accesories

Offline WarnerConstCo.

  • Posts: 4184
    • Warner Mill Works
Re: Workshop heat
« Reply #1 on: February 17, 2013, 03:16 PM »
I use a wood stove.

Offline Holzhacker

  • Posts: 1039
    • www.aic-chicago.com
Re: Workshop heat
« Reply #2 on: February 17, 2013, 03:24 PM »
There are some nice through wall high efficiency units available. I would prefer to use a dedicated, listed appliance for an attached shop. The potential fire hazards would make me leery of using some makeshift set-up for something attached to the house. You could also end up in trouble with your insurance provider if there is a problem.
That's not to say I haven't used various propane and electrical heaters over the years. I haven't had issues but know other people who have.
Since you are looking at an addition and more permanent solution by the end of the year, I would just stick with the electric space heater. It's almost March now, you only need to use it for a couple more months really. I'd save the expenditure.
"The Code is not a ceiling to reach but a floor to work up from"

Offline Wooden Skye

  • Posts: 1173
  • My little girl was called home 12-28-15
Re: Workshop heat
« Reply #3 on: February 17, 2013, 03:26 PM »
I would like to use a wood stove, but I am concerned about venting, the garage where my shop is sits under a an old wood deck, which is why I think electric is best right now.  The unit I am looking at retails for around $100.
Bryan

TS 55, (2) 1400 Guide Rails, 1900 Guide Rail, MFT/3, Domino ETS 150/3, RO 90, CT 26, OF1400, RO 150. RTS 400, LR 32 set, PS300 jigsaw, 3 abrasive systainers, (2) sys toolbox, (2) sys mini, clamps and other accesories

Offline JPF Woodworking

  • Posts: 104
Re: Workshop heat
« Reply #4 on: February 17, 2013, 05:48 PM »
I use a Williams Direct Vent furnace fired with propane. The unit is complete and fits nicely into one stud bay. Easily installed and does not draw air from the shop which cuts down on the chance of dust explosion or any such fire hazards. It is very, very efficient and my unit is 32,000 BTU's (I think, maybe it's 50K) but it heats my 26 X 32' shop (about the same size as a two car garage) with ease. I really only turn it on when I go out to work and within minutes the shop is toasty.

I thought about a wood stove but floor space in the shop is a  premium commodity and the risk of  fire is very worrisome. The unit runs about $1200.00 and comes complete (UPS) with the duct work, thermostat and everything you need to install directly through an outside wall. You can go on line and Google Williams Direct Vent Furnaces if you are interested in more information.

Pretty slick unit especially for a shop environment  IMHO. I know a lot of people select this type of heater for their garages or similar spaces that need occasional heat.
P

Re: Workshop heat
« Reply #5 on: February 17, 2013, 07:51 PM »
Workshop heat is always a concern, as we like to stay comfortable and productive no matter the weather, but here are a few things to keep in mind.

Safety is the biggest in my mind, especially if your shop is attached to the house, firewall not withstanding.
 Whatever route you go, I would look for something that is controlled by thermostat or timer so as not to run for long unattended. We all forget things, and you don't want to lose your home or family.
Contact with items in the shop, machines/ dust /wood is something to be extra vigilant about.
You must remember to shut it down/disable thermostat if you plan to do any finishing in there. A lot of fumes are explosive, especially if sprayed.
If you tap into the home heating system to heat your shop area, you have to make provision for dust/fume control.
I installed radiant heat in the concrete under my shop floor and heat it with a boiler in a separate building with this in mind so I have less concerns with the heat system than most.

Mike
"The only lessons I've learned worth remembering, were when things weren't going well"

"Who is John Galt?"

Offline Tim Raleigh

  • Posts: 3614
    • Oakville Cabinetry
Re: Workshop heat
« Reply #6 on: February 17, 2013, 07:56 PM »
 The unit I am looking at retails for around $100.

Unless that is a 240 volt heater, I doubt an electric heater that retails for 100.00 will work too well for you. Well it might work if the current cold snap in the north east eases up.
You have 1280 square feet to heat and if it's uninsulated you'll need at least 30K BTU/hr or 8507 Watts to maintain a temperature of 60F.
Tim

Re: Workshop heat
« Reply #7 on: February 17, 2013, 08:14 PM »
If its uninsulated, I'd start there.

Mike
"The only lessons I've learned worth remembering, were when things weren't going well"

"Who is John Galt?"

Offline Tim Raleigh

  • Posts: 3614
    • Oakville Cabinetry
Re: Workshop heat
« Reply #8 on: February 17, 2013, 08:19 PM »
I installed radiant heat in the concrete under my shop floor and heat it with a boiler in a separate building with this in mind so I have less concerns with the heat system than most.

Mike:
I like radiant heat too, and think it's the best solution for a shop (no blowing dust around with forced air etc.) but what do you do for cooling?
Tim

Offline tjbnwi

  • Posts: 6584
  • No longer in Cedar Tucky Indiana
Re: Workshop heat
« Reply #9 on: February 17, 2013, 08:37 PM »
Look into a mini split system.

Tom

Re: Workshop heat
« Reply #10 on: February 17, 2013, 09:49 PM »

Mike:
I like radiant heat too, and think it's the best solution for a shop (no blowing dust around with forced air etc.) but what do you do for cooling?
Tim

Tim, currently I use a thru the wall a/c unit and that works fine 95% of the summer. I am currently drawing up a central air system that will also work as a larger ambient air cleaner, all year round.
I don't use the a/c for cooling as much as humidity control, but it keeps it around 70 in the shop on the hottest days.
Mike
"The only lessons I've learned worth remembering, were when things weren't going well"

"Who is John Galt?"

Offline Wooden Skye

  • Posts: 1173
  • My little girl was called home 12-28-15
Re: Workshop heat
« Reply #11 on: February 17, 2013, 10:07 PM »
Thanks for all the responses, I am not overly concerned about cooling, I usually work out on the driveway when it is nice.  I agree that making sure it turns off when not in the shop or if I forget is important. 

Tim, my space is only 160 square feet, but part of it is unusable space, for the part where my MFT and lathe are, I think the unit I am looking at should work.  Obviously this will need to be thought of when doing our plans for the addition, right now the plan we have is to make the shop/garage 18' x 28' when finished.

JPF, I looked at the unit you mentioned and I like it, but I would wait on that until we do our renovation, or I would go with a ductless AC with heat.

Bryan

TS 55, (2) 1400 Guide Rails, 1900 Guide Rail, MFT/3, Domino ETS 150/3, RO 90, CT 26, OF1400, RO 150. RTS 400, LR 32 set, PS300 jigsaw, 3 abrasive systainers, (2) sys toolbox, (2) sys mini, clamps and other accesories

Offline Richard/RMW

  • Posts: 2309
Re: Workshop heat
« Reply #12 on: February 17, 2013, 10:30 PM »
Wooden Skye,

Check out the Enerjoy electric radiant panels @ http://www.sshcinc.com/woodshopseries.htm.

I used a single 2' by 8' panel in one 14' by 14' room in my last shop in PA and it would absolutely cook you. Mounted flat against an 8' drywall ceiling w/ 4 screws, only 1"+ thick.

I am insulating/finishing my little 10' X 12' shop now and will probably go with a single 2' by 4' panel this time, last I checked they were around $200. On 110V it draws 500 watts/4.1A for 1,700 btu and you can use a cheap line-voltage t-stat. I find with radiant heat, in a sealed space, I am very comfortable working at around 50 degrees.

RMW

As of 10/17 I am out of the Dog business and pursuing other distractions. Thanks for a fun ride!

Offline Wooden Skye

  • Posts: 1173
  • My little girl was called home 12-28-15
Re: Workshop heat
« Reply #13 on: February 17, 2013, 10:41 PM »
RMW

Thanks.  Those are slick, will keep them in mind.
Bryan

TS 55, (2) 1400 Guide Rails, 1900 Guide Rail, MFT/3, Domino ETS 150/3, RO 90, CT 26, OF1400, RO 150. RTS 400, LR 32 set, PS300 jigsaw, 3 abrasive systainers, (2) sys toolbox, (2) sys mini, clamps and other accesories

Offline Tim Raleigh

  • Posts: 3614
    • Oakville Cabinetry
Re: Workshop heat
« Reply #14 on: February 18, 2013, 08:28 AM »
Tim, my space is only 160 square feet, but part of it is unusable space, for the part where my MFT and lathe are, I think the unit I am looking at should work. 

Sorry, I should have written you have 1280 cubic feet (10 x 16 x 8) including the height of your walls if they are 8 feet. That's much different than 1280 square feet.
Tim

Offline Wooden Skye

  • Posts: 1173
  • My little girl was called home 12-28-15
Re: Workshop heat
« Reply #15 on: February 18, 2013, 10:30 AM »
Tim

No problem.  I wish i had 1200 feet at the moment.  The height is 7' in parts and 8' in others.
Bryan

TS 55, (2) 1400 Guide Rails, 1900 Guide Rail, MFT/3, Domino ETS 150/3, RO 90, CT 26, OF1400, RO 150. RTS 400, LR 32 set, PS300 jigsaw, 3 abrasive systainers, (2) sys toolbox, (2) sys mini, clamps and other accesories

Offline IG_Woods

  • Posts: 11
Re: Workshop heat
« Reply #16 on: February 18, 2013, 02:31 PM »
I always trying to avoid direct flame, or open spiral heating elements. Do you have city natural gas pipeline in your town? In my opinion it would be most safe and economical source of heat.

Offline Wooden Skye

  • Posts: 1173
  • My little girl was called home 12-28-15
Re: Workshop heat
« Reply #17 on: February 18, 2013, 07:51 PM »
No we have oil heat.  I bought the unit I was looking at and it provided me with enough heat to be comfortable in a sweatshirt and long sleeve t-shirt.  After about 5 minutes didn't even need gloves.  For my temporary solution this will work, plus the fireplace look is kinda cool.
Bryan

TS 55, (2) 1400 Guide Rails, 1900 Guide Rail, MFT/3, Domino ETS 150/3, RO 90, CT 26, OF1400, RO 150. RTS 400, LR 32 set, PS300 jigsaw, 3 abrasive systainers, (2) sys toolbox, (2) sys mini, clamps and other accesories