Author Topic: Transporting a kapex  (Read 440 times)

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Offline Rbrontario

  • Posts: 1
Transporting a kapex
« on: July 28, 2020, 05:02 PM »
Just wondering if anyone has been trailering their K-PAX for any extended period of time. I've had problems in the past with my mitre saws rattling some of the small parts loose. I'm considering purchasing the kapex but would like to hear from you guys first.  I'm also interested in how you guys secure your kapex during transport

Offline Gregor

  • Posts: 1738
Re: Transporting a kapex
« Reply #1 on: July 28, 2020, 06:18 PM »
I have not carried mine around that much (when I do I put it in the car in the UG-Cart) but I have not found any reports about problems in that regard when reading up on the Kapex before buying one.

Offline FestitaMakool

  • Posts: 534
Re: Transporting a kapex
« Reply #2 on: July 28, 2020, 07:20 PM »
I’m thinking the same as you, as I from time to time trail my tools. Usually it means very tight straps. I’ve now come to a conclusion of sourcing high density foam mats (maybe cheapest type yoga mats or similar) to put under the tools and tool boxes. It doubles as anti skid as well.
“The Stig” Yes, it is true, at least some part of it..
“If you have an old Land Rover and a fit wife, you’re most likely always busy”

Offline kevinculle

  • Posts: 338
Re: Transporting a kapex
« Reply #3 on: July 28, 2020, 08:50 PM »
I have taken my Kapex on UG cart on several long distance trips in the back of my SUV with no apparent ill effects on operation or accuracy.

Offline TSO_Products

  • Retailer
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  • Posts: 295
    • TSO Products LLC
Re: Transporting a kapex
« Reply #4 on: July 28, 2020, 09:27 PM »
Fellows - looking back on analyzing product transport survival strategies in trucks and trailers in our  experience brings one important factor to mind:

how well is the vehicle/trailer your product rides in "sprung". Is it loaded heavily enough to be riding  "in" the springs - or "on" the springs. SUV's can be fine if they are not equipped with heavy towing springs but then operatin much less havily loaded.

We have instrumented products comparable to the size and weight of Kapex on UG and tested over the road LTL transport on a pretty decent highway route. The nearly 10g (!) acceleration recorded explained why we had product assemblies vibrate loose.

If you must use a trailer, I recommend making sure the springs are deflected when loaded and shock absorbers, if installed, are in good condition. Use ballast, like any good Loadmaster to get the result you need.

Strapping the shipment tight to prevent secondary collisions between the product load and the vehicle are essential. E-track in a transport vehicle are easy and inexpensive to install and provide convenient ways to quickly secure cargo.

All this is much more important than foam padding.

Hans

Offline FestitaMakool

  • Posts: 534
Re: Transporting a kapex
« Reply #5 on: July 29, 2020, 06:44 PM »
Fellows - looking back on analyzing product transport survival strategies in trucks and trailers in our  experience brings one important factor to mind:

how well is the vehicle/trailer your product rides in "sprung". Is it loaded heavily enough to be riding  "in" the springs - or "on" the springs. SUV's can be fine if they are not equipped with heavy towing springs but then operatin much less havily loaded.

We have instrumented products comparable to the size and weight of Kapex on UG and tested over the road LTL transport on a pretty decent highway route. The nearly 10g (!) acceleration recorded explained why we had product assemblies vibrate loose.

If you must use a trailer, I recommend making sure the springs are deflected when loaded and shock absorbers, if installed, are in good condition. Use ballast, like any good Loadmaster to get the result you need.

Strapping the shipment tight to prevent secondary collisions between the product load and the vehicle are essential. E-track in a transport vehicle are easy and inexpensive to install and provide convenient ways to quickly secure cargo.

All this is much more important than foam padding.

Hans

Very true Hans. Ballast can help a lot. I know you in the US are blessed with trailers that are leaf sprung. Here the most common “springs” are torsion rods embedded in rubber.. on light load the trailer bounces like basket ball.. it improves when loaded at least with 1 third payload, but it’s still terribly bad.
In the light of this I sourced a trailer brand that has leaf springs, and ended up with a high quality Ifor Williams trailer from the UK which rides so incredibly much smoother than the garbage torsion “springs” (it shouldn’t be called springs at all).
The impact gods can receive, even in a van is no good for ie a Kapex. And where and how you strap matters as well.
“The Stig” Yes, it is true, at least some part of it..
“If you have an old Land Rover and a fit wife, you’re most likely always busy”