Author Topic: looking to build a workshop/storage shed  (Read 6452 times)

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Offline juststartingout

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looking to build a workshop/storage shed
« on: April 16, 2014, 01:30 AM »
Hi all,

I've decided that my garage is likely too small for my woodworking aspirations so I'm taking on the task of building a shed.  That's right...I wrote, build a shed.  Buying a Tuf Shed is too much $$ and I think this would be a nice next step in building my woodworking/carpentry skills.  Also it's a good excuse to pick up a Kapex.  and maybe some parallel guides.   ;)

The question I have is does anyone have any plans for a shed approx 12 x 10 'ish in size?  I am obviously still in the planning stages, but any help with materials lists and plans would be a great help.

Thanks,

Oscar
MFT3, TS55, CT 26, OF1400, RO90, RO150, Carvex PS 420 EBQ, Domino 500, and dreaming of a Kapex.

Offline Peter Parfitt

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Re: looking to build a workshop/storage shed
« Reply #1 on: April 16, 2014, 04:01 AM »
You are welcome to take a look at the plans for my barn (actually a very large shed). It was built here in the UK and so you would need to do (or get someone to do) a complete check on structural requirements and code where you live.

Peter


Offline Brice Burrell

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Re: looking to build a workshop/storage shed
« Reply #2 on: April 16, 2014, 08:58 AM »
Honestly, you can't build your own shed for anywhere near the price as one of the kits.  The advantage of the shed kit is they are the least expensive option and are easy to assemble.  The down side is they are as high a quality you'd get if you made your own shed.  I just built or I should assembled a 8x12 shed in my lard recently.  After a lot of back and forth, I decided to go with a Home Depot shed I got on sale.  All said and done I have about $1200-1300 in it and that includes building my own doors.  I value my time so for me the real value was in the time savings in not having to design and build myself, I just had to assemble precut parts....   
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Offline Paul G

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Re: looking to build a workshop/storage shed
« Reply #3 on: April 16, 2014, 09:53 AM »
Check your local building and zoning codes, in my part of NorCal a shed can only be 120 sqft and no higher than 9' without going through plan check and permits. Don't need a nosy neighbor with an axe to grind to narc on your non-compliant shed.

Also around here the sheds I see like tough shed or the ones at Costco, HD or Lowes may be framed well but all have crappy foundations/floors and doors, and often are larger than codes allow. I have a tough shed and can easily break in with a screw driver and the floor sags between the joists. My next one will be built from scratch, with a poured concrete slab/floor and a real door with a deadbolt. It will probably cost more overall but will be a huge improvement over the tough shed. Plus it's a great opportunity to learn some things, take some pride in what you built and customize it to your needs and situation.
« Last Edit: April 16, 2014, 09:56 AM by Paul G »
+1

Offline Peter Parfitt

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Re: looking to build a workshop/storage shed
« Reply #4 on: April 16, 2014, 12:46 PM »
I know that I did not need to factor in my time when building the barn but it was well under a third of the cost of getting one bought in - the only way to get a cheaper solution would be to buy a second hand one and go through the dreadful dismantling, transporting and re-assembly processes.

I wish everyone the best of luck whatever solution is decided.

Peter

Offline Tom Bellemare

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Re: looking to build a workshop/storage shed
« Reply #5 on: April 16, 2014, 02:20 PM »
I tore out a crappy deck so I then had a bunch of PT pine 2x8's that, aside from being really ugly, were perfectly good. I built some quick piers and used those leftovers as a floor structure for a new shed. It's right at the max for Austin without a permit.

I had a 'fridge that died then that had glass shelves so I used those shelve for windows and even made it so they slide open. OF 1400 to the rescue! I used that router again with the MFS so my door jamb "captures" the hinges, effectively making them theft-proof.

I went to the Habitat ReStore and got a couple of used steel doors that matched for real cheap. I don't remember how much exactly but something like $15 each. I also found hinges, a hasp, and upper/lower pegs there. While looking for the hardware, I found a brand new gallon of epoxy floor paint and a couple cans of spray Rustoleum knock off.

The whole recycled shed cost me less than $500 and it's quite solid. That's including shelves made from scrap plywood I got from a friend's rental house porch roof redecking and pegboard along the back wall. All I bought other than the doors was 2x4's, a few sheet goods, some cinder blocks, a few bags of concrete, and shingles. I had some left over tar paper already.

Oh, I also buried some conduit and added a light and two duplex outlets, one inside and one opposite it outside. I guess I paid a little for some of that but most of it was left over from other jobs.

When I think back on it, I had no plans. I just gathered a bunch of junk and made it work. I had a new neighbor move in next door recently. He asked me where I bought it because he wanted one just like it. Hah!


Tom

Offline jobsworth

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Re: looking to build a workshop/storage shed
« Reply #6 on: April 16, 2014, 03:18 PM »
Tom You are the recycle king dood   [not worthy]

Offline jobsworth

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Re: looking to build a workshop/storage shed
« Reply #7 on: April 16, 2014, 03:19 PM »
Simpson Ties used to sell a kit of their ties to frame a shed including roof framing. It included plans

Offline juststartingout

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Re: looking to build a workshop/storage shed
« Reply #8 on: April 17, 2014, 12:39 AM »
wow.  Lots of help here, thanks!  I don't have a deck or glass shelf I can recycle so i guess thats out.  thats some serious recycling. 

I did think about the permits and the kits.  i think the kit is likely the route i'll go. 

Thanks all!
MFT3, TS55, CT 26, OF1400, RO90, RO150, Carvex PS 420 EBQ, Domino 500, and dreaming of a Kapex.

Offline wow

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Re: looking to build a workshop/storage shed
« Reply #9 on: April 17, 2014, 04:18 AM »
Your post says:

"I've decided that my garage is likely too small for my woodworking aspirations"

I realize that what I am about to say can get ridiculous, but....

Decide what size shed you need, then DOUBLE it.

My shop (hobby/personal use only) is 1800 square feet, with 400 sq ft dedicated to the woodshop portion. There are many days that I wish it was twice as large - except when it comes to keeping it clean and organized, of course!!!

I'm sure lot size, location, permits, etc. all come into play, but seriously think about what you plan to do in it and store in it and you'll probably want something bigger than what you expect. After all, your post says...

 [cool]

Trying to be one of the most helpful members on the FOG.

Offline Peter Halle

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Re: looking to build a workshop/storage shed
« Reply #10 on: April 17, 2014, 06:38 AM »
Personally I think that building your own versus a kit would be a great project and a skill builder.  If you have the time, enjoy the work, and are willing to possibly spend a bit more than a kit you can have a finished product that is customized to you and your yard.  Of course you can go overboard and create a real budget buster.  I only have to look in the mirror to see a guy who did that - but I used it to get some experiences in areas that I don't normally work in.

In the planning stage please do as all the others have suggested, do research and contact your local building / planning department.  Also check to see as has been suggested if there is a max height.  Make sure you also check to see if you live in a planned community that may also have requirements.  Moving or having to take down a shed isn't any fun I imagine.  I would also suggest that you plan your shed to be in harmony with the style of your house and your yard - especially if there is more than one person in your household.  An ugly building can be like a thorn in a shoe.

With a 10 by 12 size the framing is fairly simple and waste is minimal.  Think about door and window placements - they offer air and light, but they also rob you of wall space.  If you can plan to have openings on opposing sides then you can get cross ventilation and also a way to pass longer material thru when working on it at times.

The roof design and construction is what can really set your building apart from the kits.  Think about complexity vs. appearance vs. possible storage above the ceiling joists / rafter ties.

Oh, and one other thing for now.  If I were you I would look to see if you could use the shed as a storage shed for items that take up space in your garage in an effort to be able to use the garage instead.  You might be able to gain more hobby square footage this way.  Additionally you can deal with electrical needs easier and cheaper. 

Peter

Offline Peter Halle

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Re: looking to build a workshop/storage shed
« Reply #11 on: April 17, 2014, 08:00 AM »
To follow up on my previous post, if you plan on cutting 4 x 8 sheets of plywood inside your shed, door placement can make a difference.  In the diagram below I try to show this.  With a door on the long side you may need to rotate your plywood more than if you have a door in the short walls.   Either way will work but one orientation might be better than the other.

Just a thought.

Peter

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Offline Teeravis

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Re: looking to build a workshop/storage shed
« Reply #12 on: April 17, 2014, 09:00 AM »
Great point Peter, thanks for those images!
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Offline juststartingout

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Re: looking to build a workshop/storage shed
« Reply #13 on: April 18, 2014, 12:20 PM »
Thanks Peter. 

Your point of using the shed to store other things in the garage instead of making it my shop actually came to mind a couple of days ago, between me and the wife when running electrical to the shed came up.  It seems like I could likely store other things in the shed to gain space in the garage like you mentioned!  Also if I use it for other storage I could likely get away with a smaller footprint. 

Thanks,

Oscar
MFT3, TS55, CT 26, OF1400, RO90, RO150, Carvex PS 420 EBQ, Domino 500, and dreaming of a Kapex.

Offline Colonel Panic

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Re: looking to build a workshop/storage shed
« Reply #14 on: April 18, 2014, 03:51 PM »
I like Peter's layout with the door at the end but I would use at least a 3' 6" door. 4' door would be even better. The door would need to swing out or use sliding barn door setup.
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Offline jacko9

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Re: looking to build a workshop/storage shed
« Reply #15 on: April 18, 2014, 04:01 PM »
I live in the SF bay area and use my double car garage ~ 20 x 26 ' as my shop and I sure wish I had more space.  I built a "shed" in my backyard 12 x 20' to house a spa and that is way too small for a shop IMHO.  I'm about to get rid of the spa which we haven't used in 10 years and move a lot of lumber and infrequently used shop tools out there.  If you build a shop keep in mind the power needs and lighting requirements.  If starting from scratch like you are, plan for a dust control system if you intend to build a full wood shop.

Good luck,

Jack