Author Topic: Your High School shop from the 70's….  (Read 16015 times)

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Offline gary in texas

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Re: Your High School shop from the 70's….
« Reply #30 on: August 10, 2014, 11:14 PM »
I didn't take shop in high school in the 70s - figured I would learn what was needed from my engineer dad and granddad with their various tools and power tools.  I learned, but not really the same way people did in a real class.  They weren't carpenters or woodworkers so there are a lot of gaps in my knowledge.

So at age 57 where would one go to get some shop education?

http://festooltraining.com/


Offline wow

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Re: Your High School shop from the 70's….
« Reply #31 on: August 10, 2014, 11:44 PM »
I didn't take shop in high school in the 70s - figured I would learn what was needed from my engineer dad and granddad with their various tools and power tools.  I learned, but not really the same way people did in a real class.  They weren't carpenters or woodworkers so there are a lot of gaps in my knowledge.

So at age 57 where would one go to get some shop education?

http://festooltraining.com/

If not that, most technical colleges offer woodworking curricula. That might be a good way to get introduced to the world of woodworking and let you 'play' with their tools before you decide what to buy on your own.

If you have a local woodworking store, many of them offer woodworking classes.

And finally, if you want to share your location (city and state)

(Edit: missed the fact that you had already done that  [thumbs up])

it could be that there are other Festool owners here who would be willing to help you learn. I know that I would consider doing that for the right person, in exchange for some help in cleaning and organizing my shop and helping me on a bigger project or two.
Trying to be one of the most helpful members on the FOG.

Offline Throwback7r

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Re: Your High School shop from the 70's….
« Reply #32 on: August 11, 2014, 01:17 AM »

Offline hrrb

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Re: Your High School shop from the 70's….
« Reply #33 on: August 11, 2014, 05:23 AM »
In the 70's I went to primary school (or is it called elementary school?).

We had woodworking lessons from 5th grade and all I remember was..
..dull chisels
..dull saws
..dull planes
..dull teacher sitting on his chair smoking cigars and not allowing us to use all the exciting machinery because he would then have to lift his dull behind from the chair and show us how to use the machines and make stuff! It ended up with dull pupils who lost interest. What a pity!

Later (8th grade) we had a teacher who allowed us to use the machines and taught us basic safety rules and how to use and take care of hand tools...but it was too late! Most of us had lost interest in woodworking because of the first teacher.

Luckily the woodworking bacille hit me 25 years later. Otherwise I wouldn't have all that sweet toys tools  [big grin]

/Henrik

Offline johntheoak

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Re: Your High School shop from the 70's….
« Reply #34 on: August 11, 2014, 10:47 PM »
Went to high school in the 80's. Aliquippa Pa. As a freshman we called it survival class , had to take shop with seniors. We took our lumps. When we were seniors it was paradise, used to throw dope smoking hippies into the dumpster daily. I would anything to go back to high school again, freshman or senior.





Offline Tom Bellemare

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Re: Your High School shop from the 70's….
« Reply #35 on: August 11, 2014, 11:09 PM »
I didn't take shop in high school in the 70s - figured I would learn what was needed from my engineer dad and granddad with their various tools and power tools.  I learned, but not really the same way people did in a real class.  They weren't carpenters or woodworkers so there are a lot of gaps in my knowledge.

So at age 57 where would one go to get some shop education?



My soon-to-be new shop at Mary and Lamar might be a start... I hope to be set up by Labor Day.


Tom

Offline gstuartw

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Re: Your High School shop from the 70's….
« Reply #36 on: September 03, 2014, 11:51 PM »
Lots of good input so far, thank you all. 

Given that this treatment was conceived long after I started collecting equipment the shop will not be 100% true to the era. I'm curious about the use of French cleats. Did you see French cleats in your school shop?

Offline Tim Raleigh

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Re: Your High School shop from the 70's….
« Reply #37 on: September 04, 2014, 12:02 PM »
Planning on building an assembly table (or two) that will look like this. Doors will hide systainers.

Man, I love the look of that table/cabinet.
Really reminded me of shop class, although I am not sure we had any of those in there.
Tim

Offline gstuartw

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Re: Your High School shop from the 70's….
« Reply #38 on: October 18, 2014, 10:14 AM »
My shop classes usually had a "pull down blackboard" (like a double hung window), and behind the blackboard was a place where all hand tools were located….
Bruce W.

This element of a school shop appeals to me. I'm trying to figure out how I go about making a functioning pull down.

Offline Bruce W

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Re: Your High School shop from the 70's….
« Reply #39 on: October 18, 2014, 10:51 AM »
I believe it was done very similar to a double hung window. If the casing material was removed one would find a large cast metal sash weight tied to a rope that went up over a pulley at the top of the frame.  The cast metal weight was used to counter balance the weight of the blackboard and the frame. Probably a white board in this day and age.  Not sure where one could find a cast metal sash weight.  Others may want to offer suggestions.  Hope this helps.  Bruce W in Washington state, USA

Offline Rick Christopherson

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Re: Your High School shop from the 70's….
« Reply #40 on: October 18, 2014, 02:55 PM »
Did you take shop class in the 70's in either Junior High or High School? If so what to do you recall about the shop?


Last year Festool and I donated a TS55REQ to my old high school where my son now attends. When I walked into the shop, I was shocked to find it exactly the way I had left it over 30 years ago. That was the reason why I wanted to donate the saw to them.

When I say it is exactly the same, I mean that literally. The only tool that has been moved in all these years is that the big bandsaw got moved toward the back of the class. That, plus an unused drum sander got replaced with a 20 inch planer. The 36" TimeSaver was added in my sophomore or Junior year.

I always had a memory of the huge radial arm saw, but it wasn't until I went back there that I realized it was a 16" Northfield Unipoint. The shop teacher told me that the school board had tried to get rid of the Unipoint and replace it with a smaller Craftsman radial arm saw, all because the $16,000 Unipoint was missing the recoil cable ($20 part). Thankfully he stopped them from doing that, and got the Unipoint repaired instead.

I spent most of my time there working on the Powermatic lathes. The #1 lathe was mine, and everyone else in my class knew not to touch it.  [big grin] Seeing something coming into shape right before my eyes was what was appealing about lathe work. I still have several of the turnings I made back then. As a matter of fact, I have a walnut goblet and walnut bowl sitting on my desk right now holding all of my stray pens and pencils.

Sorry the pictures are so blurry. I always forget to wipe fingerprints off the cellphone lens.  [sad] The one time I went there to demonstrate the new TS55REQ to the teacher, I brought my good camera, but I got so carried away with chatting with him that I forgot to take the pictures.  [scared] Oh, my son's shop teacher at the time was actually the son of my shop teacher from 30 years ago. His father taught me Small Engines and Electronics classes.

Offline RJNeal

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Re: Your High School shop from the 70's….
« Reply #41 on: October 18, 2014, 11:27 PM »
Rick, you and your son have a NICE school shop. Nicely equipped.

My high school shop got disbanded.
The metal shop around 1992 and woodshop in 2005sh.
Now they have an agri. Style shop class with wood and metal.

I attended 12 years of industrial arts classes in the four years of high school.
I remember my first year of metal shop and falling in love with a Boice Crane drill press and always wanting one.
Fast forward to 1992 I was doing custom farming,trenching and irrigation installations.
Some one from the sports boosters asked me if I wanted to help with the irrigation on the football field that was being replaced ( they were planing on rolling sod in ten days all 82,000 sq ft)
I told them I would like to help. The gentleman asked how much $. I replied that there was a drill press in the closed shop and that would be the tariff....
Could one of the mods please rotate the photo. Many thanks.   Yup gotcha covered. Seth
Rick
« Last Edit: October 18, 2014, 11:50 PM by SRSemenza »
Have you walked your saw today?

Offline jobsworth

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Re: Your High School shop from the 70's….
« Reply #42 on: October 19, 2014, 07:00 AM »
First Id like to say I didnt read this entire thread. So Im making this comment in hopes that its on topic. if its not then please disregard.

There are lots of ways to learn wood working, yes festool training is great for learning festools but to get the most out of the festool training you should have basic skills in woodworking. I started out at a local community college taking some cabinet making classes and progressed from there. There are a lot of places that offer classes, Woodcraft, various private individuals that offer training, woodworking clubs, etc. Your never to experienced to learn new things. Ive been woodworking for about 19-20 years and Ive sent a email to one guy that Peter Parfit recommended who teaches french polishing and traditional refinishing. As I have been buying old furniture and clocks etc since I moved here, I thought why not take advantage of the available knowledge thats out there.

Anyway I hope this helps
« Last Edit: October 19, 2014, 07:03 AM by jobsworth »

Offline gstuartw

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Re: Your High School shop from the 70's….
« Reply #43 on: October 20, 2014, 03:58 PM »
Sorry the pictures are so blurry. I always forget to wipe fingerprints off the cellphone lens.  [sad] The one time I went there to demonstrate the new TS55REQ to the teacher, I brought my good camera, but I got so carried away with chatting with him that I forgot to take the pictures.  [scared] Oh, my son's shop teacher at the time was actually the son of my shop teacher from 30 years ago. His father taught me Small Engines and Electronics classes.

No apologies allowed, the fact you have pictures is great and they help greatly. I've been deliberating painting my 6" white PVC silver and I think these pushed me over the edge! The generational part of your reply is priceless, something only a few can claim. How fortunate.

Offline Tinker

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Re: Your High School shop from the 70's….
« Reply #44 on: October 23, 2014, 04:23 AM »
I'll start with Metalshop in 9th grade. A fellow classmate was using a drill press, holding the drill vise with his hand while he drilled into his project.
You guessed it, the drill bit jammed, and the vise was launched into the air across the shop, missing several of us and finally landing a glancing blow on a guys shin. Drew blood, but mostly drew the longest outburst of cursing from the injuried guy that we had ever heard.
The instructor ran out of his office, our infamous Mr. Taylor, and proceeded to try and restore order.  The guy manning the drill press was in total shock over what had happened in the blink of an eye.

Several responders have sited school shop accidents along with memories of their first school shop room.  My first experience with wood shop was in 9th grade.  I had moved away from the farm where I had plenty of experience working with farm machinery.  My uncle had been a stickler for safety, so i had some fairly good habits instilled in me.  the school shop had several work benches set up in groups of four set up so there were two benches set up lengthwise with two benches set up at the ends of the two lengthwise benches, sort of like breadboard.  there was a table saw and a lathe.  I don't really remember the other machinery. (It was 1945, and since I am only 39, i can't remember all of those years when i wasn't really here [unsure])

I do have a very vivid memory of at least part of the floor plan and the relation of the wood lathe to that floor plan.  The lathe was set up directly in front of and parallel to a large window.  The shop door, with a pane of glass was directly opposite the window and behind anybody working at the lathe.  The door was maybe 30 feet away from the lathe.

I was making a salad bowl of some sort and was at the sanding stage of the project.  I was running the lathe at a very slow speed for two reasons.  #1 was for safety as too high a speed might be somewhat dangerous.  We had all in the class been lectured on that.  #2 We had also been told that higher the speed, the hotter wood get the sandpaper. I was one of the few in the class who was taking shop because I was really interested.  Most of my classmates were in there for an easy grade and a class where thy could get an easy grade without having to study much.  I was maybe one of only two or three who actually read anything about woodwork after class.  That was maybe the only subject that I actually studied beyond what I had been required.

Anyhow, i was nearly finished with my sanding and thinking of what i should use for a finish.  All of a sudden, one of my classmates jacked up the speed to full speed. I yelled at him immediately and he jacked the gear lever back down to its very lowest speed.  It was almost like up until full speed and then a sudden almost stop within a second or two. I did not feel anything for a few seconds, but there was damage all over the place and i could not find my glasses. As i looked around on the floor I noticed blood, and lots of it.  I did not find out about damage to the room until a day or two days later when my shop teacher visited me in the hospital.  That bowl had split into three pieces.  One had gone thru the ceiling of the room.  One had gone thru the glass of the door behind me and on the far side of the room.  the third piece had gone thru one of the window panes right in front of me. there was damage to three small areas in the room, none of which were in close proximity to another.  The closest damage was the window directly in front of me.

The window damage was the most memorable, as the piece of bowl that had gone thru the window had first collided with my face. The little experience had happened at the end of the school day.  By the time the ambulance had arrived, school was out for the day and nearly everybody in the school was out in the parking area waiting for busses.  Since it was somewhat unusual for an ambulance to be in the school yard with flashers on and having arrived with siren blaring, I think everybody in the school was looking down at my bloody face as they carried me out on the stretcher.

When i had the stitches removed a few weeks later, there were over 100 that were removable.  The doctor (Dr. Abrams)told me there had been even more inside my nose and mouth that were the desolvable type.  He told me that all in all, there had been between 200 and 300 stitches.

The worst part of the whole ordeal for me was that i was in a hospital ward for a few days.  My lip was very swollen and most of the stitches were inside and out side of my lip.  there were three guys in the ward who had everybody in different kinds of stitches.  I could not stop laughing at their antics and so suffered the consequences for having a sense of humor.  Every time i laughed, it was pure agony.  I have a few stories from that stay that i won't go into here. I still have scars but they are not noticeable.  That Doc did one fine job of stitchery.
Tinker
PS I did continue with shop classes all thru high school and ended up with a very good deal in my senior year.  I worked in shop thru maybe half the year making cabinets for the home economics rooms which were in a new building under construction.  My shop teacher, Mr. Torno, had worked a deal with the HS principal and all of my teachers where I could work on those cabinets and not have to attend my other classes.  The stipulation was that i had to take any tests and had to keep up with ALL of my homework assignments. I learned a little bit about time management that year that i would not have learned another way.  I even managed to squeeze in varsity track in the spring.  But shop was always my most exciting and memorable class.
Wayne H. Tinker