Author Topic: DRICORE....as a floor. Not a subfloor  (Read 3086 times)

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Offline Df1k1

  • Posts: 133
DRICORE....as a floor. Not a subfloor
« on: April 25, 2021, 08:33 PM »
So like most people I have a two garage floor made of concrete. I have tried mats, better shoes, I’ve tried all sorts of stuff. But it’s time to make a change. I was thinking a lot about a rubber floor but due to heavy machines and indentations etc. it just didn’t seem worth it.
So it got me thinking.... what about DRICORE just as a floor itself. I know it’s not the best looking floor in the world but right now I’m about comfort and cost. And it looks like if I need to park and occasional car on it I can get away with it. According to the rep online at a big box anyway. Thinking two coats of a very strong polyurethane over it and it may do the trick. Wondering if anyone had any experience with this.

Offline Bob D.

  • Posts: 2336
Re: DRICORE....as a floor. Not a subfloor
« Reply #1 on: April 26, 2021, 03:45 AM »
So like most people I have a two garage floor made of concrete. I have tried mats, better shoes, I’ve tried all sorts of stuff. But it’s time to make a change. I was thinking a lot about a rubber floor but due to heavy machines and indentations etc. it just didn’t seem worth it.
So it got me thinking.... what about DRICORE just as a floor itself. I know it’s not the best looking floor in the world but right now I’m about comfort and cost. And it looks like if I need to park and occasional car on it I can get away with it. According to the rep online at a big box anyway. Thinking two coats of a very strong polyurethane over it and it may do the trick. Wondering if anyone had any experience with this.

"According to the rep online at a big box anyway."

I don't think I would ever accept and answer from one of the 'online reps' or even the 'in-store reps' to give me a answer I would put this much trust in.

I prefer to ask the manufacturer and a quick Google search turned up this straight from the horses mouth.

https://dricore.com/faqs/can-dricore-subfloor-panels-be-installed-in-a-garage/
« Last Edit: April 26, 2021, 04:03 AM by Bob D. »
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Offline Bob D.

  • Posts: 2336
Re: DRICORE....as a floor. Not a subfloor
« Reply #2 on: April 26, 2021, 04:02 AM »
Your question got me thinking. I am in the process of reconfiguring an area of my 24x24 shop. This space is dedicated to shop use, I don't have to share it with a vehicle.

I am thinking that this might be the time to do what you are asking about and get myself off that hard concrete floor.

Right now I have one corner of the shop cleared out of everything. Took everything off the walls too so I could put up some better shelving and paint the walls white. It's the perfect time to start the transition to a warmer and more comfortable floor.

I was going to start putting everything back together today but now I may be making a trip to Lowes for some Dricore panels. :-)

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Offline Df1k1

  • Posts: 133
Re: DRICORE....as a floor. Not a subfloor
« Reply #3 on: April 26, 2021, 06:38 AM »
So like most people I have a two garage floor made of concrete. I have tried mats, better shoes, I’ve tried all sorts of stuff. But it’s time to make a change. I was thinking a lot about a rubber floor but due to heavy machines and indentations etc. it just didn’t seem worth it.
So it got me thinking.... what about DRICORE just as a floor itself. I know it’s not the best looking floor in the world but right now I’m about comfort and cost. And it looks like if I need to park and occasional car on it I can get away with it. According to the rep online at a big box anyway. Thinking two coats of a very strong polyurethane over it and it may do the trick. Wondering if anyone had any experience with this.

"According to the rep online at a big box anyway."

I don't think I would ever accept and answer from one of the 'online reps' or even the 'in-store reps' to give me a answer I would put this much trust in.

I prefer to ask the manufacturer and a quick Google search turned up this straight from the horses mouth.

https://dricore.com/faqs/can-dricore-subfloor-panels-be-installed-in-a-garage/
I should have been more specific. It was a DRICORE rep who stated that a car could be parked on it.  Although I have no intention on doing that but occasionally.

Offline rvieceli

  • Posts: 1539
Re: DRICORE....as a floor. Not a subfloor
« Reply #4 on: April 26, 2021, 07:09 AM »
I'm a very big fan of horse stall flooring of some kind in a shop. there are several configurations and products available. The stuff is designed to provide a non slip cushioned easy to clean environment for horses. If they good enough for high end show horses and thorobreds they should be good enough for me. If you have big stationary machines you can just floor around them not under.

Here is a vendor to show some examples.

https://www.rammfence.com/barn/horse-barn-flooring

Ron

Offline Df1k1

  • Posts: 133
Re: DRICORE....as a floor. Not a subfloor
« Reply #5 on: April 26, 2021, 08:24 AM »
I'm a very big fan of horse stall flooring of some kind in a shop. there are several configurations and products available. The stuff is designed to provide a non slip cushioned easy to clean environment for horses. If they good enough for high end show horses and thorobreds they should be good enough for me. If you have big stationary machines you can just floor around them not under.

Here is a vendor to show some examples.

https://www.rammfence.com/barn/horse-barn-flooring

Ron
Thanks Ron! I will have to move a car in occasionally. I live in Florida and it’s an older car that my wife absolutely loves so any potential storms I’m going to have to park on it. Do you know if it can withstand the weight of a small car for a day or two? I obviously don’t want a floor that’s going to have indentations all over it. I don’t see myself moving a lot of machinery especially my saw stop an out feed table will probably never move so I would work around them. In my last shop I think I move my saw stop once 

Offline Joelm

  • Posts: 127
Re: DRICORE....as a floor. Not a subfloor
« Reply #6 on: April 26, 2021, 09:04 AM »
I did Dricore R+ in my garage over the winter.  Installation was a breeze. Having small 2x2 boards have me a lot of flexibility with moving my tools around while I worked. The Dricore itself made a huge difference in temperature and comfort.
I did end up going a bit overboard and installed a floating cork floor on top. Not recessary but it made my shop even more comfy and inviting. Here is a link to my shop build including flooring.
https://www.festoolownersgroup.com/workshops-and-mobile-vehicle-based-shops/new-12'x19'-shop/30/

Online Cheese

  • Posts: 8952
Re: DRICORE....as a floor. Not a subfloor
« Reply #7 on: April 26, 2021, 11:29 AM »
This may be an option for you, it's used for flooring in motorcycle & snowmobile trailers. It's also used in some large car haulers. An HDPE overlay on both sides of the material. I'm sure it's not as cheap as Dricore but you're dealing with larger sheets rather than 2' x 2' panels.
I also noticed that Dricore rates their standard subfloor product at supporting 6642 pounds per square foot.

https://www.nudo.com/p_nupoly_quadfloor_transportation.php?crumb=%3Ca+href%3D%27l_transportation_panels.php%3Fitem%3Dproduct%27%3ETransportation+Panels%3C%2Fa%3E

Offline thudchkr

  • Posts: 189
Re: DRICORE....as a floor. Not a subfloor
« Reply #8 on: April 26, 2021, 12:02 PM »
I am currently in the process of putting down Dri-Core in my shop.  It has enough give in it, as I walk across it, that I would be hesitant to drive a vehicle atop it.  Might be fine but I plan on leaving enough room in the center of my area to be able to bring a vehicle in and park it atop my floor drain.  I plan on installing the Dri-Core along each side of my shop, skirting the open area in the center.

I plan on putting down something to spread out the weight of my heavier tools that rest on a small area, such as my Laguna Shaper that rests on casters, to avoid the possibility of dented/depressed areas.  Most of my tools, however have a larger base that they rest upon and shouldn't be to much of an issue. 

I'm happy with how it is has gone together so far and it is much easier on a body than the concrete it is covering.  Knowing it will keep my stuff up off the floor and dry, (had water run in earlier this year and freeze across the floor), was a major factor in the decision to install it.  Still haven't decided what to install on top of it, but with the OSB being only around 1/2" thick, should install something.  If anyone has suggestions, would like to hear your thoughts.

In answer to the OP's original question, I don't plan on leaving it as the "only" floor, and will use it as a subfloor, and therefore would recommend the same to others.

Clint

Offline Df1k1

  • Posts: 133
Re: DRICORE....as a floor. Not a subfloor
« Reply #9 on: April 26, 2021, 12:49 PM »
I did Dricore R+ in my garage over the winter.  Installation was a breeze. Having small 2x2 boards have me a lot of flexibility with moving my tools around while I worked. The Dricore itself made a huge difference in temperature and comfort.
I did end up going a bit overboard and installed a floating cork floor on top. Not recessary but it made my shop even more comfy and inviting. Here is a link to my shop build including flooring.
https://www.festoolownersgroup.com/workshops-and-mobile-vehicle-based-shops/new-12'x19'-shop/30/
Wow your shop looks awesome. That’s kind of what I like about the dricore. I can always put a floor over it if I get tired of the look.

Offline Df1k1

  • Posts: 133
Re: DRICORE....as a floor. Not a subfloor
« Reply #10 on: April 26, 2021, 12:55 PM »
This may be an option for you, it's used for flooring in motorcycle & snowmobile trailers. It's also used in some large car haulers. An HDPE overlay on both sides of the material. I'm sure it's not as cheap as Dricore but you're dealing with larger sheets rather than 2' x 2' panels.
I also noticed that Dricore rates their standard subfloor product at supporting 6642 pounds per square foot.

https://www.nudo.com/p_nupoly_quadfloor_transportation.php?crumb=%3Ca+href%3D%27l_transportation_panels.php%3Fitem%3Dproduct%27%3ETransportation+Panels%3C%2Fa%3E
I like the look but unfortunately significantly more. Almost $200 a sheet. And I think I would have to get involved with stringers etc. to use which I’m really trying to avoid. Dricore recommends tap cons in the outer perimeter and that’s it. So if I ever have to take the floor up for resale value it would be pretty quick and easy I would assume

Offline Df1k1

  • Posts: 133
Re: DRICORE....as a floor. Not a subfloor
« Reply #11 on: April 26, 2021, 01:02 PM »
I am currently in the process of putting down Dri-Core in my shop.  It has enough give in it, as I walk across it, that I would be hesitant to drive a vehicle atop it.  Might be fine but I plan on leaving enough room in the center of my area to be able to bring a vehicle in and park it atop my floor drain.  I plan on installing the Dri-Core along each side of my shop, skirting the open area in the center.

I plan on putting down something to spread out the weight of my heavier tools that rest on a small area, such as my Laguna Shaper that rests on casters, to avoid the possibility of dented/depressed areas.  Most of my tools, however have a larger base that they rest upon and shouldn't be to much of an issue. 

I'm happy with how it is has gone together so far and it is much easier on a body than the concrete it is covering.  Knowing it will keep my stuff up off the floor and dry, (had water run in earlier this year and freeze across the floor), was a major factor in the decision to install it.  Still haven't decided what to install on top of it, but with the OSB being only around 1/2" thick, should install something.  If anyone has suggestions, would like to hear your thoughts.

In answer to the OP's original question, I don't plan on leaving it as the "only" floor, and will use it as a subfloor, and therefore would recommend the same to others.
Thanks for the information. The website listed it at three-quarter inch but I’m assuming you’re just talking about the OSB part at a half an inch. And the car is under the weight of what the product can hold but like you I’m a little concerned. However I just don’t see many other options that suit my needs out there. What I like about the dricore as I can always go over it later if I need to with just about anything. There doesn’t seem to be a downside from what everyone has mentioned to at least trying it as a standalone floor

Offline martin felder

  • Posts: 122
Re: DRICORE....as a floor. Not a subfloor
« Reply #12 on: April 26, 2021, 01:59 PM »
I put down Dri Core in my shop over 18 years ago.  Still looks great.  I believe it was mentioned in Fine Woodworking magazine at the time.  I floated it, and it came with plastic shims.  2 x 2 ft tongue and groove.  Very simple.  They polyurethane.  Very heavy machinery goes across it or sits on top of it, no problem. 

Highly recommended for a shop.  Should be no problem if you ever want to remove it some day.


Offline Bob D.

  • Posts: 2336
Re: DRICORE....as a floor. Not a subfloor
« Reply #13 on: April 26, 2021, 02:09 PM »
I went and got some this morning and started putting it down today. Will have to do in sections and move all the machines and benches around but it's doable. Works out to about $1.48/sf. My walls sit on two courses of block so I covered the interior faces of the block too, leaving a gap to the floor.
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Offline Packard

  • Posts: 686
Re: DRICORE....as a floor. Not a subfloor
« Reply #14 on: April 26, 2021, 02:38 PM »
When I had my picture framing business I used horse mat tiles for flooring in the workshop.  This was done to make the floor easier on my feet, but it also provided insulation keeping my feet warmer in the winter. 

Interlocking tiles are about $2.00 per square foot and it is denser than the other tiles so that it can stand up to equine foot traffic.

https://www.greatmats.com/horse-stall-mats.php?gclid=EAIaIQobChMIrYGH58ac8AIVSzizAB0HAQmWEAAYASAAEgLVwvD_BwE

So more expensive than your dricore, but might make sense for areas where you stand for long periods of time.  It is 3/4" thick.  You could stack  it on the dricore in select areas.




Offline Df1k1

  • Posts: 133
Re: DRICORE....as a floor. Not a subfloor
« Reply #15 on: April 26, 2021, 06:21 PM »
I went and got some this morning and started putting it down today. Will have to do in sections and move all the machines and benches around but it's doable. Works out to about $1.48/sf. My walls sit on two courses of block so I covered the interior faces of the block too, leaving a gap to the floor.
Can you post some pics after you make some headway?

Offline Df1k1

  • Posts: 133
Re: DRICORE....as a floor. Not a subfloor
« Reply #16 on: April 26, 2021, 06:23 PM »
I put down Dri Core in my shop over 18 years ago.  Still looks great.  I believe it was mentioned in Fine Woodworking magazine at the time.  I floated it, and it came with plastic shims.  2 x 2 ft tongue and groove.  Very simple.  They polyurethane.  Very heavy machinery goes across it or sits on top of it, no problem. 

Highly recommended for a shop.  Should be no problem if you ever want to remove it some day.
Perfect. That’s what I’ve been hoping to hear

Offline CeeJay

  • Posts: 380
DRICORE....as a floor. Not a subfloor
« Reply #17 on: April 26, 2021, 07:31 PM »
Well let’s do some math here.

Average horse say 1300lb

Average car say 5000lb

Contact area of 3 shod hooves (1 raised while walking) is say 24 sq inches eg 8 sq inches per hoof. So 54 psi.

Contact area of 4 average tires is say 120 sq inches eg 30 sq inches per tire. So 42 psi.

So, assuming it’s a solid sub-floor, eg structurally can take the weight, then I would say if a horse can walk on it a car can drive on it.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
« Last Edit: April 26, 2021, 08:11 PM by CeeJay »

Offline Michael Kellough

  • Posts: 5297
Re: DRICORE....as a floor. Not a subfloor
« Reply #18 on: April 26, 2021, 09:17 PM »
“ Dricore rates their standard subfloor product at supporting 6642 pounds per square foot”

Pretty sure they find this by neatly stacking bricks or bags of sand on a panel until the plastic substrate collapses. Then they divide the total weight by 4 to get the “square foot” capacity.

But cars, horses, and machine tools don’t have square feet let alone 12”x12” square feet. You really want to know the point load capacity, basically the puncture resistance of the panel.

A 500# machine sitting on four leveling feet will be applying about 125# on each of four particular square inches. 12”x12”=144@125#per=18,000#. You could put something under the feet to spread the load but what about when you’re rolling the machine on casters?

We don’t really know from that 6642#square foot rating how it would fair under a small hard wheel under a heavy machine but since Martin fielder says it works with the very heavy machines in his shop...   [cool]

Offline Bob D.

  • Posts: 2336
Re: DRICORE....as a floor. Not a subfloor
« Reply #19 on: April 26, 2021, 10:12 PM »
Can you post some pics after you make some headway?

In no particular order. This is a little over half of what I got done today. I got 32 panels down. That includes moving everything and unloading/reloading in cabinets as required. Those cabinets have a plywood benchtop spread across them and all of it will be replaced this Summer once I get the floor done. With everything in the shop this will require multiple moves and shuffling of equipment.

I used TapCon 5/16 x 1-3/4 FH screws to secure the panels to the wall and the floor.

I decided to do the floor because I had the cabinet moved out and everything off the wall so I could insulate and drywall. Then I figured why all that stuff is out of the way why not get this corner of the floor done.

Now it's one giant snowball. :-)

Moving the bench won't be difficult, but it is anchored to the floor with Hilti drop-in anchors and 5/16" rod. Finding those anchors again after they are covered with the Dricore won't be easy.

The Drill press was not difficult I just walked it back, put down a couple panels, then moved it back in position. It too was anchored to the floor. Don't know if I will do that again as I am thinking of replacing it this year so may wait and see before I punch a couple more holes in the Dricore.

My bandsaw is also anchored to the floor with 3/8" Hilti drop-ins, then shimmed level and bolted down with 3/8" rod.

The Unisaw, router table, and accessory cabinet are all one piece and at ~900 pounds I plan to crib up to the same level as the floor then while protecting the edge of the floor panels with some scraps roll it onto the new floor. The mobile base for the Unisaw which supports the saw, router table, and a cabinet of drawers with jigs, blades, some bits, and other accessories for the saw and router rests on four 2 inch diameter feet when stationary.

At 46.125# per square inch (6642/144) those 2 inch diameter feet combined could (on paper) support 579.6 pounds, so I will look at adding a 1/4" steel plate 2.5"x2.5" under each foot to spread the load. I have never moved the saw in 10 years so I don't see this as a problem. A 2.5" square plate gets me to 1153 pounds which gives me a little margin.
« Last Edit: April 27, 2021, 06:53 AM by Bob D. »
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Offline squall_line

  • Posts: 824
Re: DRICORE....as a floor. Not a subfloor
« Reply #20 on: April 26, 2021, 10:36 PM »
“ Dricore rates their standard subfloor product at supporting 6642 pounds per square foot”

Pretty sure they find this by neatly stacking bricks or bags of sand on a panel until the plastic substrate collapses. Then they divide the total weight by 4 to get the “square foot” capacity.

But cars, horses, and machine tools don’t have square feet let alone 12”x12” square feet. You really want to know the point load capacity, basically the puncture resistance of the panel.

A 500# machine sitting on four leveling feet will be applying about 125# on each of four particular square inches. 12”x12”=144@125#per=18,000#. You could put something under the feet to spread the load but what about when you’re rolling the machine on casters?

We don’t really know from that 6642#square foot rating how it would fair under a small hard wheel under a heavy machine but since Martin fielder says it works with the very heavy machines in his shop...   [cool]

At my former job, we had a mezzanine where we stored paperwork, but we also had a pallet jack that we wheeled things around with.  The concrete floor was rated at 125 lb/sq ft or something.  I asked how I was able to walk up there at that load rating, and I got a speech about static loads vs. impact loads and overall loads vs. point loads.  I was then told to just weigh the boxes and make sure any given pallet didn't exceed the rating.

Offline Df1k1

  • Posts: 133
Re: DRICORE....as a floor. Not a subfloor
« Reply #21 on: May 01, 2021, 06:44 PM »
@Bob D. Looking good!

Offline Bob D.

  • Posts: 2336
Re: DRICORE....as a floor. Not a subfloor
« Reply #22 on: May 01, 2021, 07:23 PM »
I've gone as far as I can, ran out of panels. Maybe they have some more in stock now. I bought all they had except for a few that were damaged. Need about 65 more so I'm half way at 64 panels installed.

I got he TS and my workbench up on the new floor. My bench I had anchored with Hilti drop-ins in the floor. I thought that might be tough to hit those marks but it was easy to do.  Just have to remember your basic geometry. I wonder how these concentrated loads and the bench being anchored to the floor will affect movement of the panels. It can't float everywhere now so I hope it doesn't buckle up with temperature and humidity changes. This is probably the best time to be putting it down as the temps are middle of our range. It's going down in the 40s at night and into the 70s during the day. In a normal year we can see low teens and  20s up to 100°F in Summer.

Still lots of equipment to shuffle around as I keep working at this in between my regular work around the house.

One good thing is I will have touched just about everything in there before this is over and I've got a trash can and a scrap bin right there so no excuse for not tossing what I don't need. Hopefully I can clean out a bunch of stuff. I've taken two loads of scraps of wood and outright trash to the dump since I started this. I even trashed my old shop radio, time for a new one after 20+ years. Was a bookshelf stereo system with cassette tape player, don't need that anymore.

Still want to make room for a small CNC. I've been giving the possibility of eliminating my RAS from the shop. There are other ways to do what I use it for that don't take up so much real estate and are safer to use to boot. I know it won't bring anything if I sell it and knowing how dangerous they are I don't know if I want to. It's a shame as it is in very good condition and has all the safety upgrades that were part of the recall campaign years ago. I considered removing the saw motor and turning it into an radial arm router but probably not practical and just as dangerous so tossed that idea out.

I'll wait and see if my local Lowes gets any more panels in Monday if not I guess I am driving to the next closest which is 25 miles away. HD is more plus no military discount so difference in price is about $1/panel. Makes it worth burning 2.5 gallons of diesel @ $3.09/gal.
« Last Edit: May 01, 2021, 09:31 PM by Bob D. »
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Offline Bob D.

  • Posts: 2336
Re: DRICORE....as a floor. Not a subfloor
« Reply #23 on: May 09, 2021, 05:26 PM »
I guess I have sorta hijacked this thread documenting my Dricore install, but hey you asked for photos as I went along so just tell me when you've had enough. Might as well log all of this in one place so the next guy can learn from my mistakes.  [scared]

Since I last reported on this I have purchased another 64 panels. With the 64 I bought so far that is 128 which gets me closer to what I need. You don't really get 4sf coverage per panel. That 2x2 is nominal, actual exposure is 23.25" x 23.25". That 3/4" adds up and after 12 rows you're missing 9 inches. So looks like it will could take as many as 169 panels (13x13) not 144.

I decided to leave the bandsaw on the floor and not lift it. I am thinking I should have dome that for the DP too. The bandsaw base intersects four panels so I set that many aside which when we move sometime in the next 2 or 3 years I can use to repair the opening I left for the BS. I think I will go back and do the same for the drill press, but since that area of the floor is already covered I will cut an opening for the DP base plus a 3/8" all around. Then set the DP back in that opening and relevel and anchor to the floor again using the existing Hilti anchors.

Finding the anchors for the WWing bench was easy. Don't know what I was thinking when I mentioned it would be difficult but later my brain kicked in and I realized all I had to do was swing an arc off the center of each anchor and I could use that to precisely locate the location on top of the Dricore then drill a 3/8" hole for the 5/16" rod. Worked like a charm. I used my beam compass to draw roughly 90 degree, 14" radius arc from each anchor then after placing the floor panels I came back and swung off two points on the arc to locate the center and X marks the spot. Drilled my holes and didn't miss a one.

The most time consuming was raising the table saw/router table/outfeed table assembly since they are interconnected. On the TS base I have built a cabinet to store saw blades and other accessories for the TS and the router. Working by myself it took time running from corner to corner to raise it up (and keep it close to level) so I could get some 3/4 plywood under it and roll it over onto the new floor. Once I did that I was able to put down some more panels under where the TS lives and then shuffle some more equipment around.

Then it was time to start putting shelves back on the wall and the bench back together so I could get the stuff that was on the wall off the floor and make room to keep going with the floor. But first I needed to paint the wall.

I also needed to get my fastener cabinet back in place and loaded up again as I had boxes of screws and such all over the place. That took a while to organize but it now done and much neater than it was (see photo) but not perfect (and probably never will be).

So that's all I got done in the last week on this between all the usual stuff that keeps me busy every day. Probably won't get a chance to work on this again for a week or two except I will try to squeeze in some time to shift equipment around and clear the next section of floor.

There is one area that I need to figure how to deal with. In the third photo you can see an area I have outlined in red which is about 3 feet wide (L to R) by 9 feet long. In that area the floor slopes up from right to left 3/4" to meet the floor in the old section of the garage. Why they did not make then the same I don't know. Maybe it settled over time but the new section which is the shop area was only 5 years old when we bought the house and it was like that then. I thought maybe the plan was to add radiant heat in the floor but 3/4" doesn't seem anywhere near enough for that.

Anyway my thought is to end the Dricore and the right side of that sloped area and finish the edge with some 1/8 x 3/4" aluminum angle then use some self-leveling grout to cover that sloped area and bridge between the old floor and the Dricore.
I will cut an straight edge on the panels and butt the angle up to it with the horizontal leg out into the grouted area. I am thinking I can either just seal the angle to the concrete with some adhesive or use some Tapcon screws. But the angle would protect the edge of the Dricore and the grout from getting crushed when moving heavy loads over them and it wouldn't look bad. I guess I could use steel but I already have some aluminum left over from another project so thought I would use that up. But that's my guess at how to make this transition. If anyone has a better idea I would like to hear it.
« Last Edit: May 09, 2021, 05:40 PM by Bob D. »
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It's a table saw, do you know where your fingers are?