Author Topic: Cordless drill storage -- tin can approach  (Read 2987 times)

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Offline ChuckS

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Cordless drill storage -- tin can approach
« on: March 06, 2020, 11:52 AM »
Can't find the thread in which a FOG member shows us how he uses cut-out pipes to keep his cordless drills. I adapted his great shop solution and made the holders out of tin cans.
« Last Edit: March 06, 2020, 11:58 AM by ChuckM »

Offline TSO_Products

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Re: Cordless drill storage -- tin can approach
« Reply #1 on: March 06, 2020, 04:41 PM »
@ChuckM  - I recall seeing that earlier thread. The submitter used PVC pipe as I recall which seemed like a very practical and economical choice.

Hans

Offline Bob D.

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Re: Cordless drill storage -- tin can approach
« Reply #2 on: March 06, 2020, 04:57 PM »
Was it this one?

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It's a table saw, do you know where your fingers are?

Offline ChuckS

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Re: Cordless drill storage -- tin can approach
« Reply #3 on: March 06, 2020, 06:11 PM »
It was a different post, Bob. But the video is interesting.

(To all viewers: Please do not ever cross cut a piece on the table saw like that!) [scared] [scared] [scared]
« Last Edit: March 06, 2020, 06:14 PM by ChuckM »

Offline rubber_ducky

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Re: Cordless drill storage -- tin can approach
« Reply #4 on: March 06, 2020, 10:23 PM »
How sad... festool drills are stored in customized, padded, temperature controlled systainers and Ridgid drills are stored in rusty tin cans. :)


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Offline ChuckS

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Re: Cordless drill storage -- tin can approach
« Reply #5 on: March 06, 2020, 10:57 PM »
 [laughing] [big grin] [laughing]
How sad... festool drills are stored in customized, padded, temperature controlled systainers and Ridgid drills are stored in rusty tin cans. :)


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[laughing] [big grin] [laughing]  another proof that Festool drills are for collectors and others for r---e---a---l woodworkers. [tongue] [tongue] [tongue]

Offline Bob D.

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Re: Cordless drill storage -- tin can approach
« Reply #6 on: March 07, 2020, 07:24 AM »
It was a different post, Bob. But the video is interesting.

(To all viewers: Please do not ever cross cut a piece on the table saw like that!) [scared] [scared] [scared]

Yeah, the other thing that made me cringe was when he was using the wing cutter to make the 2" hole in the side of the pipe. He had his thumb up on top of the pipe and it didn't look more than an inch away from the end of the cutter beam. I tried to freeze frame to see but couldn't catch it.
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It's a table saw, do you know where your fingers are?

Offline Cheese

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Re: Cordless drill storage -- tin can approach
« Reply #7 on: March 07, 2020, 09:07 AM »
Yeah, the other thing that made me cringe was when he was using the wing cutter to make the 2" hole in the side of the pipe. He had his thumb up on top of the pipe and it didn't look more than an inch away from the end of the cutter beam.

If he can afford $1500 for a Kapex I think he could probably afford $5 for a hole saw.  [eek]

Offline ChuckS

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Re: Cordless drill storage -- tin can approach
« Reply #8 on: March 07, 2020, 12:09 PM »
Not sure why he did not use a fence to support the pipe when drilling the hole as you can see the pipe vibrated in the process. It'd take only a little grabbing of the bit to throw the pipe off, with a good chance of his hand being drawn to the spinning bit.

Based on this short film, I can safely gather (no pun intended) that many of his other woodworking practices are unsafe. Luck so far has been on his side.
« Last Edit: March 07, 2020, 12:11 PM by ChuckM »

Offline Lincoln

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Re: Cordless drill storage -- tin can approach
« Reply #9 on: March 07, 2020, 03:06 PM »
Crosscutting against the fence on a table saw is extremely dangerous, I hate seeing things like that on youtube, especially when it's sponsored by a well know woodworking brand.
Another bad technique shown there is trapping a piece between the mitre saw blade and fixed stop, without holding the piece.

Offline ChuckS

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Re: Cordless drill storage -- tin can approach
« Reply #10 on: March 07, 2020, 06:17 PM »
snip.
 trapping a piece between the mitre saw blade and fixed stop, without holding the piece.

Another common, unsafe saw practice seen in some of the YouTube videos, like seeing so many YouTubers not having a splitter or riving knife installed on their saws. There's a good reason why so many injuries are recorded in the OHSA database on the table saws, mitre saws, etc.

Offline xedos

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Re: Cordless drill storage -- tin can approach
« Reply #11 on: March 07, 2020, 07:32 PM »
I applaud the cleverness and utility of these storage sleeves.

However, I wonder if I'm the only one whose drills can't be stored without ruining the rubber overmolding?  My drills and drivers would have the rubber ripped off the bottom of the housing and where it meets the handle in short order;  taking them in and out of these style sleeves.

My collection consists of Bosch 12v sub compacts and Milwaukee's full size 18v.

Offline Bob D.

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Re: Cordless drill storage -- tin can approach
« Reply #12 on: March 07, 2020, 09:43 PM »
Good point. I store most of my cordless tools with the batteries removed as they don't get used every day. Without the battery most can't be stood up so can't place them on a shelf. I have to lay them down on their side.

But the T15+3 came with a pair of 15v batteries and there is only room to store them both in the Systainer if one is mounted on the tool. And for my Bosch 12V tools I do leave a battery installed on each one. They are the drills and drivers I use most often.
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It's a table saw, do you know where your fingers are?

Offline ChuckS

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Re: Cordless drill storage -- tin can approach
« Reply #13 on: March 08, 2020, 12:31 PM »
In the news, just a few days ago: https://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/newfoundland-labrador/botwood-amputation-hero-1.5486515

Numerous Youtubers are seen using the mitre saws/chop saws in an unsafe manner. At the very least, they should consider using a Fastcap 10 million dollar stick or something like that.