Author Topic: Using items for other than its intended purpose.  (Read 871 times)

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Offline Packard

  • Posts: 1891
Using items for other than its intended purpose.
« on: January 24, 2023, 10:03 AM »
I was watching a home restoration show on TV and it showed this hanging ring being used for hanging scarves in a peg hook.



It worked fine.  I do wonder if they knew the original purpose for this ring.

The company I used to work for manufactured those rings.  I kept a factory-fresh one in my closet to hang belts.  The ring itself is about 8” in diameter and was made from 0.148” diameter galvanized wire.

It is not easy to see in this photo, but there is a small formed hook at one end that allowed the ring to clasp shut.  The other end featured a hook similar to a garment hanger hook.

These were used by fur trappers to hang the gutted pelts of small trapped animals (think mink-sizes to fox-sized).

The one I used in my closet never saw any animal flesh.  The one used for scarves almost certainly had.

I wonder if they would still use it for scarves if they knew.

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Offline Packard

  • Posts: 1891
Re: Using items for other than its intended purpose.
« Reply #1 on: January 24, 2023, 12:25 PM »


It turns out that my furriers’ ring was still in my closet.  The ring diamter is 6” and the wire is 0.148”.  The latching mechanism is easier to see here.  The animal pelts would have been eviscerated and the wire would have been fed through the slit that ran from the chin to the tail and out through the jaws. 

I was told that the standard was for 10 pelts per ring.  We sold the rings for $0.35 each in 1980s.  The ad that I plucked the image from shows them at $16.00 each.  Maybe I should EBay my ring. [big grin]
A perfect place for a scarf. [eek]

That is what 45 year old galvanized wire looks like (zinc oxide corrosion).
« Last Edit: January 24, 2023, 12:28 PM by Packard »

Offline woodbutcherbower

  • Posts: 606
Re: Using items for other than its intended purpose.
« Reply #2 on: January 24, 2023, 12:40 PM »

I once caught my girlfriend scraping paint using one of my Kirschen chisels. The same day, I also caught her knocking a nail unto a wall using my rubber flooring mallet.

Offline Packard

  • Posts: 1891
Re: Using items for other than its intended purpose.
« Reply #3 on: January 24, 2023, 03:28 PM »
In the 1970s I was an independent sales representative for mechanical components.  One of the companies I represented made aircraft grade plastic fabrications. 

Their workmanship was so fine that the fused joints had no apparent seam.  The fusing became one homogenous piece of plastic.  The process was expensive.

I had a contract to produce 40 small instrument covers for a military contractor.  These were essentially a 1” x 3” x 4” box and they cost $40.00 each.  That would be $288.85 in current dollars. 

It was the perfect size box for paper clips, and that was what the receptionist was using one of them for. 

I said, “If I were you, I would very quietly throw that little plastic box away.  It is too scratched up to be used and it cost your boss $40.00.”

The receptionist went round-eyed, looked around and seeing no one watching, tossed the box in the trash.

Offline Crazyraceguy

  • Posts: 2348
Re: Using items for other than its intended purpose.
« Reply #4 on: January 24, 2023, 07:20 PM »
I do that sort of thing all the time. I'm always on the lookout for "things" that are just randomly interesting. You know it will eventually be good for something.
My machinist training came in quite handy when I got into the cabinetmaking trade.
The thing that comes to mind first though is the 8" PSA geared-orbital sander. I learned to use one of them in the place they were intended to be used, a body shop. They are known as "mud hogs" by those guys. They are intended for the initial knock-down of bodyfiller, straightening large panels.

When I first started working with solid surface material at the cabinet shop, it seemed like the perfect thing, so I brought mine in from home. It worked just as well as expected, and a couple of the guys I was working with bought them too. They had never seen such a thing before.
This isn't exactly doing something totally different, as it is crossing trades with the same tool.


I once caught my girlfriend scraping paint using one of my Kirschen chisels. The same day, I also caught her knocking a nail unto a wall using my rubber flooring mallet.
Did you get the poor girl a started set of household tools? Hammer, screwdriver, paint scraper, etc.  [big grin]

You didn't exactly share how well you took this action  [blink]
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Offline PaulMarcel

  • Posts: 1579
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Re: Using items for other than its intended purpose.
« Reply #5 on: January 24, 2023, 07:51 PM »
I once caught my girlfriend scraping paint using one of my Kirschen chisels. The same day, I also caught her knocking a nail unto a wall using my rubber flooring mallet.
Did you get the poor girl a started set of household tools? Hammer, screwdriver, paint scraper, etc.  [big grin]

Ages ago before Blue Spruce was bought by Woodpeckers, I was chatting with Dave Jeske about how many paint cans may have been opened with his pretty chisels. So I asked him to make me a paint-can opener à-la Blue Spruce:

353506-0

He liked the result so much it was a one-time tool with a caption like "gift your wife a nice paint-can opener so she won't use yours". Seemed popular at the time
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Offline Yardbird

  • Posts: 398
Re: Using items for other than its intended purpose.
« Reply #6 on: January 24, 2023, 08:36 PM »
I caught" my wife planting bulbs using a wood chisel to dig the holes.  Planting the bulbs was something she asked me to do, but I had not done it yet.  I had to just bite my tongue, then I hid the rest of my good chisels.

Offline Packard

  • Posts: 1891
Re: Using items for other than its intended purpose.
« Reply #7 on: January 24, 2023, 08:53 PM »
An old timer, when I was in my twenties, said he complained that his single edge razor blade that he put in his razor was dull after just one shave.

His wife replied, “Don’t be silly.  If it was sharp enough to cut some linoleum tiles, it certainly was sharp enough to shave with.” [eek]


Offline bobtskutter

  • Posts: 102
Re: Using items for other than its intended purpose.
« Reply #8 on: January 25, 2023, 02:44 AM »
I use the washing machine to clean paint rollers.  Scrape off as much paint as possible then put then in the drum on a rinse cycle with a couple of scoops of detergent.  They come out like new.

Our dishwasher wasn't good enough to remove the baked on grease from the oven shelves, so I used the high pressure jet wash on the drive to clean the shelves.  They also came out like new, and there was a clean spot on the drive!

Bob

Offline Packard

  • Posts: 1891
Re: Using items for other than its intended purpose.
« Reply #9 on: January 25, 2023, 12:22 PM »
Many years ago, you used to be able to buy “Spaulding High Bounce” pink balls for stick ball.  Those disappeared in the 1970s.

The High Bounce balls were actually quality control rejects from the Spaulding tennis ball production line.  These balls were rejected for poor bonding at the seam prior to adding the fabric surface.  They were re-packaged as stickball balls.

When the tanning ball production was moved offshore, that source of balls was lost. 

An avid stick ball player in Brooklyn addressed that void.  He took an old clothes dryer that no longer generated any heat, and lined the interior with self-adhesive sand paper.  Then would then load the dryer with tennis balls and let them abrade themselves until nude of all the fabric covering. 

He would make periodic checks to see if “it-was-soup-yet”.  Apparently there was no risk in over-cooking these.

Clearly these were more expensive, but they lasted far longer as they were not made from reject balls. 

I saw this on TV about 40 years ago in one of those how-is-it-made documentaries.

I have used the small commercial tumbler where I used to work to polish some wood handles (I think I used crushed walnut shells for that.  They came out perfectly smooth.

In years gone bye, wood garment hangers were finished by tumbling in huge tumblers with really hard paraffin wax.  All the current wood hangers I see have a sprayed finish.