Author Topic: Titebond cleanup  (Read 1635 times)

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Offline mcooley

  • Posts: 237
Titebond cleanup
« on: February 19, 2019, 07:03 PM »
So I picked up a bottle of this Titebond glue and was pleasantly surprised. It is thicker which works well for the Domino mortises. But the real gem is cleanup. I couldn't believe how it came off the wood with the squeeze-out. After just a few minutes the glue seems to take on a kind of wax or plastic like consistency which means when I took my glue applicator to it the glue lifted cleanly off the wood with hardly any residue. I did find out that this glue is just a bit less strong than Titebond III and it does have a short open time but in the future if Titebond could give their other glues this easy cleanup property then it would be a game changer.

That said, I will keep using this glue because it is the easiest I have ever used for removing squeeze-out without all the nonsense of this technique vs. that technique. But maybe one day I will win a Lamello LK-3!

http://www.titebond.com/product/glues/d1b48beb-7d60-4ce7-b57b-6bf19351778b
« Last Edit: February 19, 2019, 07:24 PM by mcooley »

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Offline Mario Turcot

  • Posts: 932
Re: Titebond cleanup
« Reply #1 on: March 14, 2019, 11:09 AM »
Nice find! Do you use that much glue to get a Lamello glue system?

For interior, I use Titebond no-run no-drip dry clear and tack fast.
Mario

Offline mike_aa

  • Posts: 1078
Re: Titebond cleanup
« Reply #2 on: March 14, 2019, 12:32 PM »
So I picked up a bottle of this Titebond glue and was pleasantly surprised. It is thicker which works well for the Domino mortises. But the real gem is cleanup. I couldn't believe how it came off the wood with the squeeze-out. After just a few minutes the glue seems to take on a kind of wax or plastic like consistency which means when I took my glue applicator to it the glue lifted cleanly off the wood with hardly any residue. I did find out that this glue is just a bit less strong than Titebond III and it does have a short open time but in the future if Titebond could give their other glues this easy cleanup property then it would be a game changer.

That said, I will keep using this glue because it is the easiest I have ever used for removing squeeze-out without all the nonsense of this technique vs. that technique. But maybe one day I will win a Lamello LK-3!

http://www.titebond.com/product/glues/d1b48beb-7d60-4ce7-b57b-6bf19351778b

I picked up a bottle of the Quick and Thick around the time it first came out.  Because of it's quick tack and some flexibility I thought it would work well for assembling scale buildings for model railroads.  Not directly related to woodworking, but the buildings were made of wood and thin ply.  I wanted to see how flexible the dried glue could be so I ran a comparison test with two other craft glues used in the modeling world - Aileene's craft glue and a product called Canopy Glue (which is similar to Aleene's).  On a piece of paper I ran a small bead of the Quick and Thick along  All dried clear and after more than a year there is still some flexibility to all three, but the Titebond was by far the least flexible of the three.  It does seem to be more flexible than original Titebond.  One thing that I did notice about the Quick and Thick is that it was clear after drying and stayed that way for some time, but eventually took on a slight yellowish hue.  I don't know if that matters, but it was noticeable.  I've since used the the Quick and Thick in woodworking situations where using a clamp was difficult and I found the stuff to grab, set up, and hold quickly.

Mike A.