Author Topic: Sharpening of woodworking tools  (Read 3760 times)

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Offline Steened

  • Posts: 2
Sharpening of woodworking tools
« on: May 18, 2021, 09:21 AM »
My uncle does wood carving, and I just help him sometimes and started getting into it. I didn't think about it before, but now I can say for sure: any woodworking tool has to be sharp. And it's easier to do this at the stage when the tools are just beginning to blunt.
For sharpening, it is optimal to have two stones or leather strops: medium-grained and fine-grained. But it is even better if you have a table sharpener with a set of sharpening wheels of different grit sizes.
Tell us about how you sharpen your tools, what tools do you use?

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Offline MikeGE

  • Posts: 264
Re: Sharpening of woodworking tools
« Reply #1 on: May 18, 2021, 09:36 AM »
Finally, here is a woodworking topic where everyone agrees and for which there is only one method.   ;D


Offline madjalapeno

  • Posts: 41
Re: Sharpening of woodworking tools
« Reply #2 on: May 18, 2021, 09:45 AM »
Everyone agrees???

I've been using diamond stones, and a granite block with sand paper for my chisels and planes. Tedious, but it works.

Did just get a Tormek T8 for a work project (making prototype tools for a medical device) and did take use it to regrind everything on the diamond wheel. It really is scary sharp.
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Offline DynaGlide

  • Posts: 1096
Re: Sharpening of woodworking tools
« Reply #3 on: May 18, 2021, 09:56 AM »
I just bought into the scary sharp system that Jonathan Katz-Moses shows in his YouTube. It's about $50 and it got my block plane to cutting paper easily so for my uses, it's perfect.
Instagram @matts.garage

Offline Peter Parfitt

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Re: Sharpening of woodworking tools
« Reply #4 on: May 18, 2021, 10:25 AM »
I just bought into the scary sharp system that Jonathan Katz-Moses shows in his YouTube. It's about $50 and it got my block plane to cutting paper easily so for my uses, it's perfect.

My late brother kept on at me to start scary sharpening and I eventually gave in and have never looked back. I sold my fully loaded Tormek and spent just a few pounds on a piece of float glass and some diamond paper. My initial supply came from Lee Valley but then I bought some from Axminster and was lucky enough to be sent a sample from 3M. It is dead easy and as the OP says, it is best to sharpen regularly rather than waiting for tools to be really dull.

Peter

Offline ChuckS

  • Posts: 2885
Re: Sharpening of woodworking tools
« Reply #5 on: May 18, 2021, 10:27 AM »
Finally, here is a woodworking topic where everyone agrees and for which there is only one method.   ;D

I agree...there's only one sharpening method, the one (whatever it's) that a woodworker finds working for her or him! [tongue]

Offline squall_line

  • Posts: 776
Re: Sharpening of woodworking tools
« Reply #6 on: May 18, 2021, 10:43 AM »
Finally, here is a woodworking topic where everyone agrees and for which there is only one method.   ;D
Everyone agrees???
I agree...there's only one sharpening method, the one (whatever it's) that a woodworker finds working for her or him! [tongue]

I took @MikeGE 's comment to be akin to this:  [poke] [popcorn]

That said, I look forward to keeping tabs on this, not for the entertainment value, but because the education I receive through reading the conversation is one of the valuable parts of the FOG to me.

Offline MikeGE

  • Posts: 264
Re: Sharpening of woodworking tools
« Reply #7 on: May 18, 2021, 10:50 AM »
I took @MikeGE 's comment to be akin to this:  [poke] [popcorn]

That said, I look forward to keeping tabs on this, not for the entertainment value, but because the education I receive through reading the conversation is one of the valuable parts of the FOG to me.

That's how I intended it!  On three of the other woodworking discussion boards I frequent, sharpening method discussions tend to evoke heated reactions and sometimes result in the Moderators closing the threads.  As @ChuckM stated, the correct method is the one that works for the individual.  The method I use might cause others to storm my shop with torches and pitchforks because it differs from the way they were taught.

Offline DynaGlide

  • Posts: 1096
Re: Sharpening of woodworking tools
« Reply #8 on: May 18, 2021, 10:51 AM »
I just bought into the scary sharp system that Jonathan Katz-Moses shows in his YouTube. It's about $50 and it got my block plane to cutting paper easily so for my uses, it's perfect.

My late brother kept on at me to start scary sharpening and I eventually gave in and have never looked back. I sold my fully loaded Tormek and spent just a few pounds on a piece of float glass and some diamond paper. My initial supply came from Lee Valley but then I bought some from Axminster and was lucky enough to be sent a sample from 3M. It is dead easy and as the OP says, it is best to sharpen regularly rather than waiting for tools to be really dull.

Peter

I think that's the take away. If something works, is reliable, and gets you the results you need then it's good. And if it just so happens to cost next to nothing compared to the alternatives, all the better.
Instagram @matts.garage

Offline squall_line

  • Posts: 776
Re: Sharpening of woodworking tools
« Reply #9 on: May 18, 2021, 11:01 AM »
For the plebes in this group (or the lurkers who don't do nearly as much woodworking as some people on the FOG) (i.e., "asking for a friend")...

Most sharpening discussions apply to hand tools such as chisels and hand planers, yes?  I'm probably not going to try to sharpen my own TS or HK blades/teeth, nor sharpen carbide cutters on router bits or power planers?  Those items in particular seem to require quite a bit more attention paid to weight and balance of the final result?

Offline ChuckS

  • Posts: 2885
Re: Sharpening of woodworking tools
« Reply #10 on: May 18, 2021, 11:23 AM »
Snip. The method I use might cause others to storm my shop with torches and pitchforks because it differs from the way they were taught.
I suppose that if that happened, you do have some good sharp tools around to defend yourself. [big grin]

Offline squall_line

  • Posts: 776
Re: Sharpening of woodworking tools
« Reply #11 on: May 18, 2021, 11:28 AM »
Snip. The method I use might cause others to storm my shop with torches and pitchforks because it differs from the way they were taught.
I suppose that if that happened, you do have some good sharp tools around to defend yourself. [big grin]

Not according to the people who are storming the shop!  [cool]

Offline MikeGE

  • Posts: 264
Re: Sharpening of woodworking tools
« Reply #12 on: May 18, 2021, 12:02 PM »
Snip. The method I use might cause others to storm my shop with torches and pitchforks because it differs from the way they were taught.
I suppose that if that happened, you do have some good sharp tools around to defend yourself. [big grin]

Not according to the people who are storming the shop!  [cool]

And that would be their mistake.  Never bring a torch to a chisel fight! 

Offline ChuckS

  • Posts: 2885
Re: Sharpening of woodworking tools
« Reply #13 on: May 18, 2021, 12:16 PM »
Snip.

And that would be their mistake.  Never bring a torch to a chisel fight!
As they say, prevention is better than cure. I recommend that you post a picture similar to this on your shop door....

Offline hdv

  • Posts: 353
Re: Sharpening of woodworking tools
« Reply #14 on: May 18, 2021, 01:55 PM »
OK, I'll bite...   [scared] [cool]

After trying several methods, I settled on a set of Shapton stones, a large diamond stone (in my case a DMT) for flattening my Shaptons, and a Beavercraft strop for that last finishing bit. It works great for me. The only times I wish for something else is when I have to make the back of a very wide chisel or a plane iron straight when it really is not. That takes tooooo long.   [embarassed]

I have been eyeing a Sorby Pro Edge or Axminster Ultimate Edge, but haven't decided yet if I really would want one.

I seriously tried to do my sharpening freehand, but my hand coordination really isn't up to that. Far from it. I wish it was. So now I just use the Mk II honing guide from Veritas. I recently received the sharpening guide from Woodpeckers, but haven't had the time to try it out yet. It's been weeks, maybe even months, since I have been in the shop to do some woodworking.  [crying]

Offline Oso Rojo

  • Posts: 120
Re: Sharpening of woodworking tools
« Reply #15 on: May 18, 2021, 02:24 PM »
Stepping back from the method one must first understand the basic rules of sharp.
1. Consistent angle, without which sharp become rounded.
2. Course enough abrasive to move the needed amount of metal.
3. Repeat application without changing number 1 or 2.
4. Continue number 3 until desire is reached.

Most every problem I've see in sharpening has violated on of these rules. So you can see that many different solutions can work.

For me personally, it's a set of Shapton stones, a Worksharp woodworking sharpener, and a Worksharp Ken Onion knife sharpener. The Worksharps I like because the help greatly with number 1 above, they have the jigs to keep the angles consistat. The Shaptons I continue to grow into as my sharpening skills get better.

Something like a chisel or plane blade I get the angle set with the Worksharp and then finish the honing by hand on the stones. Kitchen knives I do all by hand on the stones. Packet knifes and work knives I use the belted worksharp for the speed.

Somewhere along the way is an Edgepro which I still think of fondly for teaching me a lot about sharpening the the rules above. An Tormek is still in the corner and get's used on the compound angled turning tools.

Offline Sparktrician

  • Posts: 4191
Re: Sharpening of woodworking tools
« Reply #16 on: May 18, 2021, 05:19 PM »
Finally, here is a woodworking topic where everyone agrees and for which there is only one method.   ;D

BA-HAHAHAHA!!!!
- Willy -

  "Show us a man who never makes a mistake and we will show a man who never makes anything. 
  The capacity for occasional blundering is inseparable from the capacity to bring things to pass."

 - Herman Lincoln Wayland (1830-1898)

Offline Sparktrician

  • Posts: 4191
Re: Sharpening of woodworking tools
« Reply #17 on: May 18, 2021, 05:22 PM »
I think that's the take away. If something works, is reliable, and gets you the results you need then it's good. And if it just so happens to cost next to nothing compared to the alternatives, all the better.

Don't forget the stonings and boilings in hot oil...   [big grin]
- Willy -

  "Show us a man who never makes a mistake and we will show a man who never makes anything. 
  The capacity for occasional blundering is inseparable from the capacity to bring things to pass."

 - Herman Lincoln Wayland (1830-1898)

Offline Mini Me

  • Posts: 94
Re: Sharpening of woodworking tools
« Reply #18 on: May 19, 2021, 10:23 PM »
Spending big money on systems and equipment can now be avoided by using the Unicorn method and I think it is safe to say that everyone who has tried it is a convert. It was developed initially to overcome edge chipping on mediocre quality blades and has proven to be a big success at that and obviously works on better quality blades as well.

http://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=The+unicorn+method+sharpening

http://www.inthewoodshop.com/WoodworkTechniques/TheUnicornMethod.html#:~:text=The%20Unicorn%20Method%20is%2C%20in,leaves%20a%20very%20sharp%20edge.