Author Topic: Bring your Chamfer to the next level  (Read 1703 times)

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Offline Mario Turcot

  • Posts: 1276
Bring your Chamfer to the next level
« on: April 08, 2021, 01:58 AM »
Video worth 10,000 words
Mario

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Offline Roachmill

  • Posts: 291
Re: Bring your Chamfer to the next level
« Reply #1 on: April 08, 2021, 04:02 AM »
 [eek] He's got some skills but, watching to the very end where he uses it, I just hope he keeps his fingers.

Offline Peter_C

  • Posts: 1059
Re: Bring your Chamfer to the next level
« Reply #2 on: April 08, 2021, 01:09 PM »
45* bit, plus a router table with a fence, same result no?

He does build some crazy stuff though...

Offline JimH2

  • Posts: 1040
Re: Bring your Chamfer to the next level
« Reply #3 on: April 08, 2021, 06:44 PM »
He is doing his best to have a slip up with those fingers casually moving around the cutter.

Offline squall_line

  • Posts: 242
Re: Bring your Chamfer to the next level
« Reply #4 on: April 08, 2021, 08:45 PM »
He is doing his best to have a slip up with those fingers casually moving around the cutter.

I was going to say,  the lack of push stick gave me pause, but I was even more concerned at leaving the thing running and using it as a hand rest in between pieces.

Offline ChuckM

  • Posts: 2616
Re: Bring your Chamfer to the next level
« Reply #5 on: April 08, 2021, 09:59 PM »
Stay tuned. His next release would be a ... Router Stop. [tongue] [big grin]

Offline Cheese

  • Posts: 8426
Re: Bring your Chamfer to the next level
« Reply #6 on: April 08, 2021, 10:57 PM »
Interesting video, and some really nice machinist gear. He’s got some really nice stuff.  [big grin]. He certainly didn’t cheap out on the equipment.

I don’t really understand what he’s doing as his machine tools are already fully capable of performing the task he wants to do and in a much safer manner.

If it’s a .030” wide chamfer...then I get that, however if it’s a .400” wide chamfer...then I don’t get that. It’s a lot safer to produce that on the mill.

Another interesting snippet is that he went from woodworker to metal fabricator. I’ve always experienced the opposite transition.


Online DeformedTree

  • Posts: 1413
Re: Bring your Chamfer to the next level
« Reply #7 on: April 09, 2021, 12:36 AM »
Interesting video, and some really nice machinist gear. He’s got some really nice stuff.  [big grin]. He certainly didn’t cheap out on the equipment.

I don’t really understand what he’s doing as his machine tools are already fully capable of performing the task he wants to do and in a much safer manner.

If it’s a .030” wide chamfer...then I get that, however if it’s a .400” wide chamfer...then I don’t get that. It’s a lot safer to produce that on the mill.

Another interesting snippet is that he went from woodworker to metal fabricator. I’ve always experienced the opposite transition.

I thought maybe this was some Aprils fools joke at first, or some plan to just way overthink/over complicate something for fun.  I think he was just looking for something to build, the fabrication was the fun part. 

But holy cow, him actually using it, i could only cringe.  Just thinking of the slug of metal launching into his gut. And then all the terrible finger action. One part very dangerous machine, One part very dangerous operator.

I get that such a setup might be easier or less hassle then tilting the head on the mill if you need something a standard chamfer mill doesn't do, but at the same time, straight blocks like this are not where I tend to have chamfers (on metal).

I don't think woodworker to metal is that odd. Just think of cost of entry.  Big picture all of humanity went woodwork to metalwork over time. You just tend to have a lot less people who do metal working (at home).

Also if you are someone who gets obsessed with accuracy, it would make sense to go wood to metal.

Offline Svar

  • Posts: 2396
Re: Bring your Chamfer to the next level
« Reply #8 on: April 09, 2021, 02:03 AM »
I don’t really understand what he’s doing as his machine tools are already fully capable of performing the task he wants to do and in a much safer manner.
It's much faster that way. No need to align and re-clamp for each side.
I don't get why people are so shocked by it. Surely safer than an average table saw. I wouldn't do 10 mm chamfer on steel with it, but have no problem with aluminum or brass. I do it all the time on a router table, although I don't feed small pieces with bare fingers and grip them with a clamp or a jig.
« Last Edit: April 09, 2021, 02:14 AM by Svar »

Offline Svar

  • Posts: 2396
Re: Bring your Chamfer to the next level
« Reply #9 on: April 09, 2021, 02:08 AM »
Just thinking of the slug of metal launching into his gut.
It's only about 6 meters per second takeoff speed with that bit, then subtract air resistance while it's flying. What could possibly go wrong?  [unsure]
« Last Edit: April 09, 2021, 02:15 AM by Svar »

Offline pixelated

  • Posts: 274
Re: Bring your Chamfer to the next level
« Reply #10 on: April 09, 2021, 08:50 AM »
It's not as though very many of us are ignorant of the possibilities around a kickback, but I got quite the reminder about it just last week.
I was ripping a small piece of pine that I was re-purposing to make a small box, using my table saw. It was about 3 inches wide, 5 inches long and 1/4 inch thick. I was ripping a fresh edge on it, taking off maybe 1/4 inch.
I don't actually know what happened, I suspect it may have had a pin in it from it's previous assembly that I hadn't noticed. But something caused the blade to catch, and the saw launched it into my belly hard enough to cause a bruise 3 or 4 inches in diameter. I was wearing a thick sweatshirt with a tee under it. It felt like I got punched hard.
No appendages harmed though, so, a not so bad learning experience.

Given the size of the lathe in the background in that guy's shop, he is aware, or should be aware of the possibilities. I would guess he wouldn't attempt to cut that chamfer on his mill hand-holding the workpiece. Hopefully, he isn't comparing the power of the router motor to his big machines and thinking it's harmless. 

Offline WillAdams

  • Posts: 87
Re: Bring your Chamfer to the next level
« Reply #11 on: April 09, 2021, 10:31 AM »
Okay, now I don't feel so bad about buying the cheap chamfering plane from China, and wanting (lusting for) the Woodpeckers EZ Edge Corner Plane which inspired it:

https://www.woodpeck.com/ez-edge-corner-plane.html

(apparently it graduated from One-Time Tool to full-time production?)

That said, I don't like the way it (and the Slickplane before it: https://www.woodstockint.com/products/W1100 concentrate wear on a single point --- at least the Slickplane distributes it across two cutters) --- really need to work up a nicer jig for a block plane.

Offline Crazyraceguy

  • Posts: 389
Re: Bring your Chamfer to the next level
« Reply #12 on: April 10, 2021, 09:34 PM »


Another interesting snippet is that he went from woodworker to metal fabricator. I’ve always experienced the opposite transition.

That has been my experience too. My vocational training was as a manual machinist. At least that is what they would call it today, as this was before CNC machines in all but the most leading edge companies.
When I first started at Sandvik back in 1981, they only had 2 CNC Bridgeport milling machines, and that was a huge multi-national company. They also had a long gone type of machine called NC. It had no computer on-board. It worked by reading a paper tape that was generated in the engineering office and inserted into the machine like an old fashioned reel to reel tape player.
Later I worked as a metal fabricator/weldor in a bodyshop.
My woodworking actually started as a homeowner doing DIY projects and smaller things like bandsaw boxes and turnings.
When I first started at the cabinet shop, one of the first questions I had was about tolerances. There was nothing noted on the shop drawings. I was used to working with as close as .0001" and was fully aware that wood and wood products require nowhere near this, but I did think there would be something?
I still dabble with metal, having a small lathe/mill combination machine in my home shop. I comes in handy for work projects once in a while, as does the Jet wood lathe. It's not often enough to justify having them at work, so I just do those once or twice a year projects at home.
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