Recent Posts

Pages: [1] 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10
1
Fun, Games, Diversions / Re: A drill bit that saved a life
« Last post by Coen on Today at 05:51 PM »
Coen, from here and previous posts of you I sense a lot of mistrust towards car drivers from you. I do not share your sentiment, at least not here in Holland. In my experience, cars are always very careful around cyclists, except maybe the occasional 21 year old in an overly tuned Japanese car. On the other hand, I see a lot of dumb things from cyclists, especially those on a racing bike, as they think they own the entire road, speed by in crowded spots, and ignore traffic lights as they please.

Go over the border into Germany... all the jerks in cars have a Dutch license plate on their car. If German police would enforce their passing distance law... the gas tourism would end soon  [cool]

My best friends' sister was killed by a drink driver. I was hit a few years ago by a dipshit that was standing still and accelerated onto the priority bike path while I was straight in front of him. And just last week a guy in a Mercedes tried to ram me out of this life because I disagreed with him using the bike path as a place to turn his car around. I always like to say; if he had done so in the USA, I probably could have shot him right in the head, no charges. But his Mercedes with enlarged rims had a bad turn radius and my response time is nil, so I did a 180 and rode away. Had it been the USA... I would have loved the "stand your ground" idea man...

Also look at past two years; way way way less traffic due to Covid lockdowns, but still almost the same number of "traffic deaths". Meaning car drivers abused more space on the road to illegally drive past the speed limit more often.

20 years ago the road near my parent's house was a through-route. The police put down a speed radar once in a while and the results were published in the local newspaper... "1560 vehicles passed the check, 1386 were fined, allowed speed 50 km/h, average speed 65 km/h, maximum 92 km/h"
The daughter of the neighbors in that street was also killed by a car driver than ran here over in the street. And 30 years later they also lost a grandkid to a car.

Do you remember Hans Wiegel? Famous Dutch politician. His first wife died in a car crash... he then married her sister... and she also died in a car crash.

Car violence is ominous, outside NL even more.

If I could get 50% of the fine for all the stuff car drivers pull off... I would work on the bicycle for 8 hours per week and have a paid-off home by the end of the year. I fact, I could sit in front of my parents house in a lounge chair and live from the speeding tickets alone. Or I could walk 2 km from here and sit in a lounge chair and live off the tickets for all the car drivers that drive through a sign explicitly banning cars from that road...
Or sit next to the N-road and fine all the drivers with the mist lights on. Every 3 minutes €90 * 50% = €1350 per hour.
2
Fun, Games, Diversions / Re: A drill bit that saved a life
« Last post by Alex on Today at 05:18 PM »
I would disagree that commuting is inherently safer than sport riding.

I would disagree too. Commuting is more prone to accidents than sport riding because traffic in a city is a lot more complicated. I am saying, the NATURE of the injuries is different. If you go fast on a racing bike, your head is in real danger. If you go slow in the city, your head is not the first thing to worry about. The skull is also a natural helmet.
3
Fun, Games, Diversions / Re: A drill bit that saved a life
« Last post by Vtshopdog on Today at 04:48 PM »
Reminds me of my bike racer days back in late 80’s early 90’s when US Cycling and UCI mandated helmets for events. Lots of pushback.  They started it with juniors and us higher category guys were all too cool (read: “stupid”) to want to do this and standard practice was to warm up with it strapped to your bars, pull it on at start line then off again at finish.

Many helmets back then were heavy and hot, not the case today and there’s no reason to not wear one.

I would disagree that commuting is inherently safer than sport riding. Perhaps on dedicated bike lanes, but in urban environments dealing with cars, skateboarders, dogs, pedestrians (whatever) introduces many variables that can lead to one’s head meeting with hard objects.

I bike commuted probably 300 days a year and my rule of the road was to assume cars COULD see me and that they were actively trying to hit me. It was on me to get out of their way….
4
Fun, Games, Diversions / Re: A drill bit that saved a life
« Last post by Bob D. on Today at 04:16 PM »
To each his own. If you don't want to wear a helmet don't. If you do then be my guest.

There are pros and cons to each position, the biggest beef seems to be in being forced to wear one for those that prefer no to.

I rode a Harley (1980 Low Rider) for many years. In my state (NJ) helmets are mandatory, so I wore the helmet for 99% of my time in the saddle. A group of us rode to Laconia, NH to see our first race there in 1981, it is a no-helmet state and we all could not wait to take them off. We crossed the state line, pulled over and removed our helmets. Rode the next 30 some miles to the place we were staying overnight and to a man (and woman) we all said it was not a pleasant experience. Just not used to the noise I guess, and the sound of traffic was louder so everything seemed closer (by sound) than we were used to.

Anywho we all wore our helmets for the rest of the trip. It's what we were comfortable doing so not a problem. When I would ride to Delaware I kept my helmet on, even though Delaware is a no-helmet state also.

If you don't want to wear a helmet, you shouldn't have to, same for seat belts. It makes no difference to me. Your body, your choice.
5
Quote from: jcrowe1950 link=topic=69568.msg672172#msg672172

In the U.S. the CT15 now comes with the RAS hose with the antistatic feature and the bleeder valve in the nozzle.

That makes the CT15 a good choice for those who use track saws.
6
Fun, Games, Diversions / Re: A drill bit that saved a life
« Last post by Alex on Today at 04:11 PM »
I think there are two types of riding a bicycle, commuting/recreational and sport riding. There is no need at all for a helmet for simple commuting as the speed is mostly between 10-20 kph. Wearing a helmet at those speeds will add absolutely nothing in safety. Most accidents that happen there, in the city, are collisions with cars, and the helmet won't do jack for you.

But for sport riding the speeds go up to 30-40 kph or even more, and that's where a helmet is essential. Most accidents that happen to sport riders are single sided, like slipping, or a collision with a steady object, and that's where you can get seriously damaged.

Here in Holland everybody has had a bike since we could walk, and I rode my city bike for 40 years without any serious accident or injury. And then I got a faster touring bike with 3x8 gears, and suddenly 40 kph was a reality. I had the bike for less than a year, doing 30 kph, when I slipped on a wet spot on a bridge and broke my clavicle and bruised my head. Head injury was nothing serious, luckily.

Nevertheless, in the hospital they very thoroughly checked my head for internal bleeding, as that can suddenly kill you overnight. When I got home I saw in the news that happened the same day Michael Schumacher hit his head while skiiing, and became a vegetable. I decided that from now on, I needed a helmet with these speeds. Funny thing was, I was 35 km from home when I fell, later I bought a very professional helmet for peanuts from a guy living only 500 meters from that spot. Some things are just meant to be.

Coen, from here and previous posts of you I sense a lot of mistrust towards car drivers from you. I do not share your sentiment, at least not here in Holland. In my experience, cars are always very careful around cyclists, except maybe the occasional 21 year old in an overly tuned Japanese car. On the other hand, I see a lot of dumb things from cyclists, especially those on a racing bike, as they think they own the entire road, speed by in crowded spots, and ignore traffic lights as they please.
 
7
Member Projects / Re: H&K Custom Barn Doors
« Last post by TXFIVEO on Today at 03:59 PM »
Raised panel sliding door built and installed in Allen, TX…
8
I believe Festool says they will support a discontinued product for 10 years. Generally, replacement parts aren't really an issue...

However having said that, I know of several items for the discontinued RAS 115, the RS 2, the HL 850 bench stand and the Surfix oil system that are no longer offered.

So it can be kind of a junk shoot.  [tongue]

The discontinued the bench stand. But parts for it you can probably still buy for 10 years.

How do you think I got my PS module for the CMS? I handed my dealer a list of parts I wanted  [cool]
9
Hand Tools / Re: Recommend a 12" 300mm METRIC Rafter Speed Square
« Last post by neeleman on Today at 02:56 PM »
TRACER metric rafter square 305mm.
Available from Toolstation in Europe only?
10
Ask Festool / Re: Festool Recon Topic (compiled)
« Last post by GoingMyWay on Today at 02:21 PM »
TS 55 REQ-F Track Saw just posted.
Pages: [1] 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10