Author Topic: iPhone competence vs the traditional camera  (Read 3970 times)

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Offline Cheese

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iPhone competence vs the traditional camera
« on: January 03, 2020, 12:56 AM »
I'm a big photo buff, I've been actively taking 35mm photos since the 70's when I first purchased a Minolta SRT 101 black body.

Over the years the photos taken with smart phones have improved slowly but surely, however within the last 3-4 years they've improved dramatically.

I've been mightily impressed with the photos I've taken with my iPhone 6s. It's convenient to use, convenient to carry and convenient to download from.

Recently however I tried using an iPhone 11 and an iPhone 11 Pro. My God...what an improvement.

My wish in the coming weeks is to submit some photos comparing an iPhone 5 vs an iPhone 6s vs an iPhone 11 vs an iPhone 11 Pro vs a Nikon D500.

Here's a shot of Jackson on the couch using an iPhone 11 Pro. This isn't even the native resolution as I chopped it in half for posting purposes.


« Last Edit: January 03, 2020, 01:00 AM by Cheese »

Offline rvieceli

  • Posts: 1687
Re: iPhone competence vs the traditional camera
« Reply #1 on: January 03, 2020, 05:57 AM »
@Cheese

The "best" camera is the one you have with you. Your smart phone absolutely qualifies there.

Ron

Offline Jiggy Joiner

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Re: iPhone competence vs the traditional camera
« Reply #2 on: January 03, 2020, 06:09 AM »
I used to say you can’t beat an SLR or DSLR, even up to quite recently. Having seen the photo quality on some of the latest smart phones, even the less expensive ones, I’m starting have a re think.
Some of the shots I’ve seen recently from a phone, I would of sworn they were taken with a conventional camera.
I believe one of the things that makes a camera superior is the lens choice. Even a cheap camera will give good results with a decent lens attached.

I still think a DSLR has the advantage for the purists but, the gap is closing.
@Cheese That photo of Jackson is amazing, and good enough for all but a purist. I love the train too!  [thumbs up]

Offline egmiii

  • Posts: 220
Re: iPhone competence vs the traditional camera
« Reply #3 on: January 03, 2020, 09:19 AM »
When lighting is average to good, the latest iPhone does very well against modern DSLRs. Thanks to the internal post processing, the images straight from the camera generally look better. However, DSLRs still dominate in low light. But, like the previous posted said, the best camera is the one you happen to be carrying.

Offline Peter Halle

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  • Remington Steele - My Third Boy
Re: iPhone competence vs the traditional camera
« Reply #4 on: January 03, 2020, 09:19 AM »
@Cheese

I just did the big leap from the iPhone 6 to the entry level iPhone 11.  I too am enjoying the exponential difference in photo quality.  I used to have to use Adobe Camera Raw for each image.  Now I rarely have to edit.

Love the low light improvements.

Here is a picture of my wife after pre-selecting our newest Golden (Remington Steele) who will join our family on January 12th.  Low light situation in a basement with minimal editing in the app.  Resized for the forum.



Peter




Offline ChuckS

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Re: iPhone competence vs the traditional camera
« Reply #5 on: January 03, 2020, 10:22 AM »
Question: How do those iphone images compare to those shot with a DSLR when both are zoomed in on a computer screen, or when they are printed out on larger sheet stock  (posters, for example)? Anyone have such comparison experience?

Offline Cheese

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Re: iPhone competence vs the traditional camera
« Reply #6 on: January 03, 2020, 10:36 AM »
I just did the big leap from the iPhone 6 to the entry level iPhone 11.  I too am enjoying the exponential difference in photo quality.  I used to have to use Adobe Camera Raw for each image.  Now I rarely have to edit.

Love the low light improvements.

Here is a picture of my wife after pre-selecting our newest Golden (Remington Steele) who will join our family on January 12th.  Low light situation in a basement with minimal editing in the app.  Resized for the forum.


Adorable puppy Peter...you've always got to have a pair of them.  [big grin]

I am also awed with the low light level performance. The sharpness is also improved either from better lens elements or better focus sensors. I also noticed that the photos appear more natural/neutral without much color bias. Skin tones are also very noticeably better. The results are a pretty dramatic change in the quality of the photos. This shoot-out I'm planing on may be quite interesting especially when you throw in the D500.

Curious as to what you resize the forum photo to?
« Last Edit: January 03, 2020, 10:38 AM by Cheese »

Offline threesixright

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Re: iPhone competence vs the traditional camera
« Reply #7 on: January 03, 2020, 10:47 AM »
Yeah, I'm also mighty impressed by the 11 pro. Many times I wishes I took my DSLR with me, but now for the first time it feels like I'm carrying a small camera with me [tongue]. The 0.5 wide lens and the DOF (although software) gives you something to play with.

[thumbs up]

Offline RKA

  • Posts: 1987
Re: iPhone competence vs the traditional camera
« Reply #8 on: January 03, 2020, 11:01 AM »
I used to sneer at camera phone photos (as a self-confessed SLR snob), but that was over 10 years ago.  These phones are quite good now, but I'm still using an iphone 6.  The clever use of goldens to sell an iphone 11 might be working on me.

Meanwhile, my SLRs has been gathering dust for 4 years. 
-Raj

Offline rmhinden

  • Posts: 509
Re: iPhone competence vs the traditional camera
« Reply #9 on: January 03, 2020, 11:23 AM »
I agree with this thread.  My wife and I upgraded from the iPhone 6 to the 11 Pro last year.   The cameras are remarkable.   Beside the three (wide, normal, zoom) photo modes, I really like to portrait mode.   I use it for many things that are not people.   

Bob

Offline Michael Kellough

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Re: iPhone competence vs the traditional camera
« Reply #10 on: January 03, 2020, 11:49 AM »
I agree with this thread.  My wife and I upgraded from the iPhone 6 to the 11 Pro last year.   The cameras are remarkable.   Beside the three (wide, normal, zoom) photo modes, I really like to portrait mode.   I use it for many things that are not people.   

Bob

Has anyone learned what the 35mm lens equivalents are?

Offline RKA

  • Posts: 1987
Re: iPhone competence vs the traditional camera
« Reply #11 on: January 03, 2020, 12:14 PM »
13mm f2.4
26mm f1.8
50mm f2.0
-Raj

Offline rvieceli

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Re: iPhone competence vs the traditional camera
« Reply #12 on: January 03, 2020, 12:17 PM »
35 mm equivalents for iPhone 11 Pro

Ultra wide = 13 mm

Wide = 26 mm

Tele = 52 mm

Ron

Offline Michael Kellough

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Re: iPhone competence vs the traditional camera
« Reply #13 on: January 03, 2020, 04:20 PM »
Thanks for the lens info guys.

Back in the day when 35mm was considered a “miniature” format they debated what a normal lens focal length was. That is, which focal length matched the perspective of the human eye? There was a 50mm camp and a 55mm camp. Most sided with 50mm.

So, now 52mm is tele?!

I was hoping the third lens on the iPhone 11 was actually a longer focal length than the “long” lens on the iPhone 10. A little disappointed and though there are a lot of other improvements I’ll wait for a future version.

Offline Blues

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Re: iPhone competence vs the traditional camera
« Reply #14 on: January 03, 2020, 04:51 PM »
I currently shoot with a Canon 1DXM2. My 2 cents.  Firstly it's the lens that takes the picture. Secondly its the photo sensor. What a DSLR gives you is the capability to shoot in a wide variety of scenarios. Also these images can be cropped and printed. Every photo diode in the sensor captures more information(light). It's not the case with the phone camera.. It's software. While the phone camera is certainly very capable (i shoot with a note 10+) the primary advantage is that you are carrying it every where. So it's certainly useful in a pinch. But if i know i have to make a picture or shoot a clip it's always my dslr. Phone camera is primarily for instant gratification and sharing. If you can discern the difference then it's always worth it. But if you can't then the cheaper quicker option always wins. Same goes for good tools. Why use Festool as against a harbor freight? You certainly can make out the difference.
« Last Edit: January 03, 2020, 04:54 PM by Blues »

Offline derekcohen

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    • In The Woodshop
Re: iPhone competence vs the traditional camera
« Reply #15 on: January 05, 2020, 03:44 AM »
I've been shooting photos with a iPhone 6 for the past 18 months in place of my Canon DSLR. The quality has been better (!) and especially in low light situations (relevant to photos in my workshop). I was talking about this to my wife recently when we discussed purchasing a new camera ... I would rather upgrade my iPhone.

Regards from Berlin

Derek
Visit www.inthewoodshop.com for tutorials on joinery, hand tools, and my trials and tribulations with furniture builds.

Offline FestitaMakool

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Re: iPhone competence vs the traditional camera
« Reply #16 on: January 05, 2020, 08:48 AM »
Hi,

As a long time amateur photographer, who also started with Minolta (Dynax series) at the time with 35mm slide film. Mostly shoot with Fuji Velvia and Sensia. Then the exposure wasn’t forgiving errors. Control over lighting, shutter speed and aperture was everything.

Moving to digital changed a lot, but in my head I’m still “shooting film”. Both the cameras and phones are more and more capable and more forgiving. Still, my now iPhone XS is mainly used for documentation. Under good lighting it is certainly very good. But when darkness and other demands challenges it, it is not. Also changing and controlling the variables that you can do with a DSLR is miles ahead still.

My camera kit now is Nikon with D700, D500 and D850 bodies with almost all f4 Nikon zooms, including 300 f4 and 1,4 tc. So the range goes from 16mm to 420mm in 35mm format and this extends upwards by a factor of 1,5 when using APS format as with D500.
The glass, the perspectives, parameters as shutter speed and aperture, ISO low light capability, long time exposures, shooting high key, low key.
And the list goes on speaking for a “proper” camera system.

it’ll take a long time before I part my camera gear for a phone for serious photography.
But, the phone is always with me, and I have taken photos I wouldn’t have had the chance if it wasn’t with me, and I really appreciate that. Some are quite good, others I regret not having the “right tool for the job” with me.
It all comes down to needs, expectations and of course skills.
“The Stig” Yes, it is true, at least some part of it..
“If you have an old Land Rover and a fit wife, you’re most likely always busy”

Offline kevinculle

  • Posts: 481
Re: iPhone competence vs the traditional camera
« Reply #17 on: January 05, 2020, 09:27 AM »
I do all of my photography with my Pixel 3 phone, which has a really terrific camera system.  I couldn't imagine lugging around a dedicated camera...unless it hangs constantly from a strap on your neck and powered up it has a fatal flaw.  Unless you are only interested in photographing landscapes great pictures are mostly a transient opportunity that you miss if you aren't ready with a camera at hand.  My phone is always in my pocket or hand and in a few seconds I can be shooting, it's near impossible to have that state of readiness with a camera.

Offline JeffSD

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    • Jeff Maysent Photography
Re: iPhone competence vs the traditional camera
« Reply #18 on: January 05, 2020, 03:32 PM »
Interesting topic.

Phone cameras have gotten very good, but the dividing line (for me, at least) depends on the ultimate purpose of the shot.

If the goal is to share an image electronically on small screens, I'll take the shot on my iPhone x. The quality is good and it's very easy, compared to the workflow of my DSLR and mirrorless cameras.

If the goal is a printed image, I haven't found phones to be a substitute for the large, high quality raw files that can be produced by a high megapixel DSLR, or mirrorless camera with a high quality lens. If I can get the shot using a tripod, so much the better.

For me, printing large on a wide format printer is still the domain of the "real" cameras. Will that be the case in 5-10 years? Given the rapid advance of the phone cameras, I'm not sure I'd bet on that.

Best,
Jeff

jeffmaysentphotography.com   

   

Offline Jiggy Joiner

  • Posts: 1111
Re: iPhone competence vs the traditional camera
« Reply #19 on: January 05, 2020, 04:01 PM »
I think it’s safe to say that a decent DSLR with good glass, and when needed a decent external flash, is still the tool for producing the best results. It boils down to what the individual finds acceptable.

It’s got me thinking, for the purist photographer, I might try and design a DSLR that is equipped to make and receive phone calls, and run various apps on it’s flip screen!  [tongue]

Offline Sparktrician

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Re: iPhone competence vs the traditional camera
« Reply #20 on: January 05, 2020, 04:22 PM »
If I'm just documenting something, I'll use my phone.  Otherwise, I grab the serious mirrorless G9 with some wonderful glass to do a credible job of capturing a good image.  I said bye-bye to DSLRs a couple of years ago after being a Nikon guy for 35 years. 
- Willy -

  "Show us a man who never makes a mistake and we will show a man who never makes anything. 
  The capacity for occasional blundering is inseparable from the capacity to bring things to pass."

 - Herman Lincoln Wayland (1830-1898)

Offline greg mann

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Re: iPhone competence vs the traditional camera
« Reply #21 on: January 06, 2020, 09:18 PM »
After being a Nikon guy for almost 35 years myself, I just got back from the  Galapagos Islands where I took all photos with an IPhone XS Max. I am sure five years ago I would have argued there would be no way I would have left my DSLR behind. My reasons were based on changing priorities. The trip was a family trip, read grandchildren 6 to 13 yrs, that changed my literal focus away from photography and more to family interactions. Were I to be on my own the choice would have been different. That said, the cellphone allowed me to take wonderful pictures in the normal flow of the days and had I wished I could have used it while snorkeling as well. I have no regrets about the decision.
Greg Mann
Oakland, Michigan

Offline Cheese

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Re: iPhone competence vs the traditional camera
« Reply #22 on: January 07, 2020, 01:20 AM »
Like others, I was a dedicated camera user. Lots of years ago I’d religiously visit the Virgin Islands every 2 years and sail for 2 weeks. There was no scuba diving done only snorkeling. I always brought with me a Nikonos underwater 35 mm camera.

The max depth the Nikonos was subjected to was probably 3-4 feet. It wasn’t much but there weren’t many underwater camera options at the time. The only other viable option was an underwater camera housing that was bulky and was in the $1000+ region.

So now the iPhone 11 Pro arrives on the scene and produces some stunning photos and it’s also water proof to the 6’ level for 30 minutes.

I’m really tempted to test the waterproofness of this phone. Again, this option quietly shows other camera options the door.

Whether SLR, DSLR or mirrorless these new iPhones usher in a world of convenience and picture quality unthought of just 2-3 years ago.

The only dedicated camera market that seems to be holding it’s own or expanding is the Leica group.