Author Topic: This was cheap and worked pretty well for a backdrop.  (Read 4091 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline Bill Wyko

  • Posts: 821
I rembered I had a cut off of white laminate from an old project so I spring clamped it in place and the curve made for a decent backdrop. I'm no photographer so I need all the help I can get. ;)
The bitterness of poor quality, lingers long after the cheap price is forgotten.

Offline johne

  • Posts: 223
  • The Netherlands
Re: This was cheap and worked pretty well for a backdrop.
« Reply #1 on: May 12, 2008, 06:54 AM »
Bill,

That seems to work fine, I would position the sheet a little lower so that you have more flat surface. That way you will not get such a hard shadow as in your second picture

7561-0

This is a side view of what I mean

Offline Anthony

  • Festool Dealer
  • *
  • Posts: 124
  • Feel a bit like Rocko
    • IDEAL TOOLS (Australia) for FESTOOL
Re: This was cheap and worked pretty well for a backdrop.
« Reply #2 on: May 12, 2008, 07:25 AM »
Is there general consensus on the best location for shadow with these studio shots? Left or right side, lower than higher?

Edit - I was so interested in your use of laminate for backdrop and lighting it, that I looked past your vessel completely. Sorry, nice work indeed Bill.
« Last Edit: May 12, 2008, 07:46 AM by Anthony »
Regards,
Anthony

Festool Shop Owner

IDEAL TOOLS (Australia)
http://www.idealtools.com.au

Offline ccmviking

  • Posts: 411
    • Blue River Cabinetry Kitchen and Bath
Re: This was cheap and worked pretty well for a backdrop.
« Reply #3 on: May 12, 2008, 09:06 AM »
I think your goal for most shots would be no shadow.  Takes a bit of playing with added light to do that...  Johne can you suggest some decent quality tri-pod mounted lighting that accepts filters to change temperature?

Chris...

Offline Bob Swenson

  • Inactive Member
  • *
  • Posts: 184
Re: This was cheap and worked pretty well for a backdrop.
« Reply #4 on: May 12, 2008, 10:54 AM »
Johne,
What program do you use to make those neat drawings?
Bob

Offline johne

  • Posts: 223
  • The Netherlands
Re: This was cheap and worked pretty well for a backdrop.
« Reply #5 on: May 12, 2008, 11:03 AM »
Anthony,

There is no rule concerning the shadow direction. However like Chris said most product shots have very little shadow because of the diffuse nature of the light mostly used in these shots. A little shadow is needed to "anchor" the subject to the ground. If you remove all shadow then you get that floating, cut-out look.

Chris,

What sort of light are you looking for, flash or tungsten? And why would you want to change the color temp. of the lights.
If you need to change color temperature to match different light sources you should take a look at the Lee filter collection.

http://www.leefilters.com/lighting/products/range/ref:I46C9C0F254FD6/

They sell them in large sheets that you can cut to size.
All lights, can be used with these filters, be they flash or tungsten, just tape em on the lamp or use clamps etc..

If you use tungsten be carefull with the heat they generate, they could melt your filters.

Let me know what kind of light you re looking for and i will see if i can help.

Offline johne

  • Posts: 223
  • The Netherlands
Re: This was cheap and worked pretty well for a backdrop.
« Reply #6 on: May 12, 2008, 11:14 AM »
Johne,
What program do you use to make those neat drawings?
Bob

Hi Bob,

This was done in Photoshop (I mostly use that), The tool i used for the line drawing is the pen tool.
You can then add color to the path you just drew with the "Stroke path command in the Paths palette

7563-0

7565-1

A vector based drawing program like Illustrator can be used as well.

Offline Bill Wyko

  • Posts: 821
Re: This was cheap and worked pretty well for a backdrop.
« Reply #7 on: May 12, 2008, 01:29 PM »
Thanks very much. With info like this I'll keep getting better. The lighting was just my flash and the shop lights. I do have some halogens on a tripod at my business though. I'll put this info to use asap. Thanks again.
The bitterness of poor quality, lingers long after the cheap price is forgotten.