Author Topic: Wood Prep Tool Advice  (Read 1600 times)

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Offline Nailed IT

  • Posts: 27
Wood Prep Tool Advice
« on: July 25, 2020, 10:50 AM »
I am looking to prepare rough cut hard woods in as a hobbyist in a small shop area.  After being spoiled working with a friend in a production wood shop with serious jointing and planing capability, I have not the room nor the need for those type of tools at this time.  Having seen bench top tools for planing and jointing, descriptions and reviews can be mixed and contradictory. 

Right now I have some 4/4 and 6/4 poplar shorts (4 ft.) I would like to prep so I can regain and improve my skills since I have been away from the hobby since we had a family addition.  Any advice here would be great and much appreciated!

Thanks,


Bill
A systainer of bits and bytes.

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Offline derekcohen

  • Posts: 468
    • In The Woodshop
Re: Wood Prep Tool Advice
« Reply #1 on: July 25, 2020, 11:07 AM »
Poplar is a softer wood. So, why not try hand planes?

Regards from Perth

Derek

Offline TSO_Products

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Re: Wood Prep Tool Advice
« Reply #2 on: July 25, 2020, 11:16 AM »
@Nailed IT  - welcome back to the hobby with the smart move to post this question on the FOG rather than reinvent the wheel.

It would probly help readers to provide relevant advice if you posted what tools you already have available and whether  you want to be a hybrid woodworker or focusing on hand tools.

Also help to know whether this particular project is a one-time only or you are likely to work with more rough sawn hardwoods ongoing/

Hans


Offline grbmds

  • Posts: 2005
Re: Wood Prep Tool Advice
« Reply #3 on: July 25, 2020, 01:15 PM »
There is no better bench top planer than the Dewalt 735 for results. I don't know much about table top jointers, but I'm sure there are some great ones out there.

However, if you don't have the room or the money to spend, then I would suggest that you find a resource for at least planing to the desired thickness. If you aren't a frequent worker in your shop it's going to be a difficult frustrating process to flatten and smooth rough lumber.

For example, while I have a jointer and a planer, I also buy hardwoods from a retail supplier who will do custom planing, drum sanding, and probably other operations. They, of course, aren't exactly cheap but, if you aren't running a lot of wood through your shop, this might be a good option temporarily until you either become more active or get more space/money.
Randy

Offline Nailed IT

  • Posts: 27
Re: Wood Prep Tool Advice
« Reply #4 on: July 27, 2020, 12:41 PM »
@Nailed IT  - welcome back to the hobby with the smart move to post this question on the FOG rather than reinvent the wheel.

It would probly help readers to provide relevant advice if you posted what tools you already have available and whether  you want to be a hybrid woodworker or focusing on hand tools.

Also help to know whether this particular project is a one-time only or you are likely to work with more rough sawn hardwoods ongoing/

Hans


Sorry, for being vague.  I currently utilize space in my garage.  I try to keep all my tools on wheels so I can rearrange the puzzle that is my workspace so I have room to work.  I built a 4x8 version of the Ron Paulk work bench that is on casters.  The table has mounting for my DeWalt portable table saw.  Other tools I have:  Sliding compound miter saw, regular miter saw, TS 55, circular saws, hand held routers including an OF 1400, small table top router table, RO sanders including an RO 90, Delta band saw, drill press, Domino 500, CT 26 and shop vac, and a large format scroll saw.  I have other hand tools obviously as well as drills etc.

What I do not have: Planer/planing capability (either hand or machine), jointer. 

My preference would be to have a mobile capability (on wheels) to flatten and square boards.  I would not mind developing hand planing skills, but I am really short on time at the moment and would like to focus on prepping some wood for some small projects and being able to utilize some of the other tools I have mentioned that have sat for so long.

My current wood supplier offers jointing one edge and two sided face planing.  It is better than nothing but they are 40 mins away one way and I would like to have the capability of controlling thickness on site other than just sanding.  I purchased the poplar I have as an inexpensive material to enjoy and build some skills and projects with.  I would definitely like to try some other hardwoods as I progress.

I have looked at the DeWalt 735 and it has a stand with wheels.  Small and mobile are definitely a plus.  Table top jointers?  Are they any good?  Well, this is why I am here asking.  I have read this forum for many years and this group has some brilliant minds and a lot of varied experience from all over the world.  I am open to suggestions. 

If I have left anything out let me know.  I am mid-fifties retired raising a two year old son so my mind isn't what it once was!! :P



A systainer of bits and bytes.

Offline ear3

  • Posts: 4108
Re: Wood Prep Tool Advice
« Reply #5 on: July 27, 2020, 02:00 PM »
I would definitely second the 735 suggestion.  I bought the planer second hand in a package with the stand, but found the stand not to be that great in terms of storage and mobility maximization (like you, I run my shop out of the garage), so I built my own mobile cabinet and added a folding extension table for longer boards.  You can also add a Shelix cutterhead, which produces a much superior finish, vastly extends the life of the cutters, and lowers the noise level to that of other woodworking machines, as opposed to the awful caterwaul the planer normally produces with the stock knives.

Since you have a track saw, you have the ability to rip a straight edge, so all we're talking about is whether you also need a jointer for achieving a flat face on the board.

Keep in mind that a planer can double as a jointer if you build a planer sled.

I have never owned a jointer, but don't suffer in any way as a result, and I build the vast majority of the time starting from rough lumber -- I guess I spend a bit more time on the front end dressing the wood, but that's it. Mainly I work by hand to joint with either a scrub or fore/jack plane.  It actually doesn't take a great deal of skill to joint a board by this method -- you just need to get one side reasonably (but not perfectly) even, and then you can send it through the planer to establish a truly flat reference surface on the other side.

When doing a lot of longer boards, you can set up a router sled.  I work now with the Woodpeckers slab milling jig, which can be put away and compactly stored when not in use.  It's not cheap, but they now have an intermediate version specifically for jointing boards.  But it's a relatively simple matter to build your own version.

I can't comment on the functionality of smaller bench top jointers, but I feel like it would not be worth it if you plan on working regularly with wider or longer boards.
« Last Edit: July 27, 2020, 02:11 PM by ear3 »
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Online Cheese

  • Posts: 7527
Re: Wood Prep Tool Advice
« Reply #6 on: July 27, 2020, 02:08 PM »
I have an older Delta 6" jointer with a 48" bed that's a joy to use. However it's always buried under and behind many items and it's a PITA to pull it out. I decided to purchase the Festool HL 850 planer with a bench stand for those fairly short 3'-4' pieces of wood. After being jointed, I'd run them through the Dewalt 735 planer with the Byrd Shelix head, that seemed simple.  [big grin]

Man was I ever disappointed with the results of the Festool planer when used as a jointer. It's cute and it doesn't take up a lot of room but that's where the positives end. The 14" long bed is just too short for any lumber longer than about 12"-18". The fence also has a little movement in it so the jointing will never be at a true 90º.

I'll keep it and use it as a hand planer but as a bench mounted tool it's almost useless. Unfortunately I have a feeling that other small bench mounted jointers will give you the same results.

I'd consider jointing with your TS 55 and then purchasing a Dewalt 735 for planing. Dewalt makes a mobile stand for it as it's very heavy and the table extensions fold up for a smaller storage profile. There's also a shelf under the stand for storage of items. 


Offline Birdhunter

  • Posts: 3097
  • Woodworker, Sportsman, Retired
Re: Wood Prep Tool Advice
« Reply #7 on: July 27, 2020, 03:35 PM »
I have the complete Festool planer Set and it is not suitable as a jointer. You might want to look at the Lie Nielsen #8 jointer plane. It’s a real beast and is good at jointing reasonable sized boards. Properly sharpened, it leaves an excellent finish.
Birdhunter

Offline Nailed IT

  • Posts: 27
Re: Wood Prep Tool Advice
« Reply #8 on: July 28, 2020, 12:24 PM »
Thanks for all the replies!!  I have been doing some research on all the suggested options and learned a lot. They have certainly suggested that I really clarify my future goals, since all of them require their own committement.

@grbmds, @ear3, @Cheese  It seems the DeWalt 735 is a winner especially if you replace the cutter with an aftermarket helical cutter.  I have seen the Byrd Shelix and the Lux Cut III.  Comparisons I have seen seem to indicate that the Lux Cut may have a few improvements over the Shelix.  Has anyone had any experience with the Lux Cut? 

I have really given up on the idea of a bench jointer. It doesn't seem practical or worthwhile.  Other options using a planer/router seem like much better options for me.  I really love the cart you made @ear3!  The stands for the mobile table saw and compound miter saw were heavy and a pita as @Cheese so rightly points out.

Also, I am looking into a hand plane as well. I don't know that it is really avoidable to not have the option and the skill.  Thanks @Birdhunter & @derekcohen.

Again, I really appreciate all the suggestions and welcome any other comments.  They all really help me think through the process.

Bill
A systainer of bits and bytes.

Offline grbmds

  • Posts: 2005
Re: Wood Prep Tool Advice
« Reply #9 on: July 28, 2020, 01:56 PM »
@Nailed IT The 735 is a great planet even as it comes off the shelf without the upgrade to the Shelix cutter head. I’ve used mine as I bought it, with the factory head and HSS knives. Since I own a jointer with a helical head I know that this gives great results. However equipping the 735 with a helical head is expensive and, unless you have some planet machine knowledge, difficult to do on your own. I get great results with high speed steel knives. I’ve also had success honing these knives. You can either make or buy a jig for this.

Whether the upgrade to the Shelix head is worth the cost depends on your use. In my case mine is now pshing 15 years old and it’s just not worth it, especially when I continue to get great results as is. If I bought a new one I would consider it but would probably pay someone locally to do the upgrade so I could spend the time woodworking.
Randy

Offline Nailed IT

  • Posts: 27
Re: Wood Prep Tool Advice
« Reply #10 on: July 29, 2020, 01:40 PM »
What techniques do owners of the DeWalt 735 use for dust/chip collection?  From videos I've seen it looks like a wooden snow maker! :P
A systainer of bits and bytes.

Offline ear3

  • Posts: 4108
Re: Wood Prep Tool Advice
« Reply #11 on: July 29, 2020, 07:27 PM »
I use just a Grizzley wall mounted dust collector, with a super dust deputy, and as of a few weeks ago, a canister filter..  The blower is so strong on the 735, though, that you may be able to hook it up directly with a short hose to a can without a formal dust collector, if you don't otherwise have need for dust collection.  The main issue is just the amount of chips produced by the machine.  I worked for a couple of years with a shop vac, and it just became too annoying to have to empty the bag several times during a planing session.

What techniques do owners of the DeWalt 735 use for dust/chip collection?  From videos I've seen it looks like a wooden snow maker! :P
« Last Edit: July 29, 2020, 09:59 PM by ear3 »
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Offline grbmds

  • Posts: 2005
Re: Wood Prep Tool Advice
« Reply #12 on: July 29, 2020, 07:47 PM »
I have a 1 1/2 HP Oneida cyclone with a HEPA filter. If you are using the planer in your shop you will need some sort of a dust collector as planers produce a mountain of chips and sawdust.
Randy

Offline hobe

  • Posts: 1
Re: Wood Prep Tool Advice
« Reply #13 on: July 31, 2020, 12:04 PM »
I've been getting away with using a Rockler dust right bag attached directly to the 735.  It's not ideal but it works well enough - especially if you're just using it occasionally.

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Online Cheese

  • Posts: 7527
Re: Wood Prep Tool Advice
« Reply #14 on: July 31, 2020, 02:02 PM »
I have a Jet DC that I don't even turn on when I use the DW 735. The blower is strong enough in the Dewalt to just pump all of the dust into the Jet. Nice...quieter than running both. [big grin]

Offline Nailed IT

  • Posts: 27
Re: Wood Prep Tool Advice
« Reply #15 on: July 31, 2020, 10:34 PM »
Thank you again for the responses!!  I ordered the 735x with cart with some piping and a bag.  It is not the end all solution dust collection-wise but will allow me to plane the boards I have right now while I look at something more elaborate.  Looking forward to putting some tools to work and making some sawdust!

I again thank all that responded.  I seriously researched each suggestion and weighed the options. It would not be a surprise if I end up with a hand plane or too in the near future.  Many rabbit holes to choose from!!

Bill
A systainer of bits and bytes.

Online Cheese

  • Posts: 7527
Re: Wood Prep Tool Advice
« Reply #16 on: July 31, 2020, 10:56 PM »
I ordered the 735x with cart with some piping and a bag.  It is not the end all solution dust collection-wise but will allow me to plane the boards I have right now while I look at something more elaborate.  Looking forward to putting some tools to work and making some sawdust!

Bill, I'd suggest that when you start using the planer that you index the cutting depth in very small increments. The Dewalt factory blades are pretty soft and they are easily damaged. If you start to see lines/grooves in the planed surface then you'll know the blade has been damaged. To help alleviate the issue, slightly move each planer blade in a different direction and hopefully that will eliminate the grooving for a short while.

The softness and short longevity of the standard Dewalt straight blades is the reason many opt for the other blade options that are out there.

There are carbide blades available for around $250 and then the Shelix is around $450. The nice thing about the Shelix option is that it also reduces the noise by about 10 db, that's huge. The 735 will literally SCREAM at you and it becomes incredibly obnoxious. The Shelix solves that issue.  [smile]

Offline rvieceli

  • Posts: 1224
Re: Wood Prep Tool Advice
« Reply #17 on: August 01, 2020, 06:27 AM »
@Nailed IT The Dewalt is a nice machine. I picked one up used with the Shelix from some one who had upgraded to a larger planer. It is noisy but you should be wearing hearing protection any way.  [wink]

If you don't have proper PPE now is a good time to get some. Safety glasses and I prefer the earmuff style of hearing protection.

I like these from 3M:

https://www.amazon.com/3M-Peltor-Optime-Earmuff-H10A/dp/B007JZCVAQ?ref_=ast_sto_dp

A nice addition to the planer is a digital read out.

https://www.amazon.com/Wixey-WR510-Digital-Readout-Fractions/dp/B001PTGBSK?ref_=ast_sto_dp

Ron
« Last Edit: August 01, 2020, 06:35 AM by rvieceli »

Online Cheese

  • Posts: 7527
Re: Wood Prep Tool Advice
« Reply #18 on: August 01, 2020, 10:20 AM »
A nice addition to the planer is a digital read out.

As Ron mentioned, the Wixey digital read out is a very useful addition...I'd actually say it's a necessity.  [smile]

Make sure you get the latest WR 510 model as it runs on 2 each AAA batteries. The early model, which I have, uses 1 each CR2032 cell which lasts for only 3-4 months.

Offline Nailed IT

  • Posts: 27
Re: Wood Prep Tool Advice
« Reply #19 on: August 01, 2020, 02:47 PM »
I ordered the 735x with cart with some piping and a bag.  It is not the end all solution dust collection-wise but will allow me to plane the boards I have right now while I look at something more elaborate.  Looking forward to putting some tools to work and making some sawdust!

Bill, I'd suggest that when you start using the planer that you index the cutting depth in very small increments. The Dewalt factory blades are pretty soft and they are easily damaged. If you start to see lines/grooves in the planed surface then you'll know the blade has been damaged. To help alleviate the issue, slightly move each planer blade in a different direction and hopefully that will eliminate the grooving for a short while.

The softness and short longevity of the standard Dewalt straight blades is the reason many opt for the other blade options that are out there.

There are carbide blades available for around $250 and then the Shelix is around $450. The nice thing about the Shelix option is that it also reduces the noise by about 10 db, that's huge. The 735 will literally SCREAM at you and it becomes incredibly obnoxious. The Shelix solves that issue.  [smile]

Sounds like a plan!  I am not in a hurry with my project and really want to become familiar with the tool.  As you mentioned, the blades are a weak point, but I wanted to get started as I weigh options for upgrade.  I had read that the Lux Cut III ( https://mywoodcutters.com/LuxCutIIIHead_for_DEWALT_13_INCH_Planer_Model_DW-735?search=dewalt+735 ) was actually an upgrade compared to the Shelix, but it is currently on backorder.  I am all for the noise reduction and better planing result. It doesn't seem like anything off the rack works the way you want it without some sort of mod. these days. :D 

@Nailed IT The Dewalt is a nice machine. I picked one up used with the Shelix from some one who had upgraded to a larger planer. It is noisy but you should be wearing hearing protection any way.  [wink]

If you don't have proper PPE now is a good time to get some. Safety glasses and I prefer the earmuff style of hearing protection.

I like these from 3M:

https://www.amazon.com/3M-Peltor-Optime-Earmuff-H10A/dp/B007JZCVAQ?ref_=ast_sto_dp

A nice addition to the planer is a digital read out.

https://www.amazon.com/Wixey-WR510-Digital-Readout-Fractions/dp/B001PTGBSK?ref_=ast_sto_dp

Ron

Amen on the PPE!!  I have a set for all my activities including sleep!! :D

The digital read out I have run across while researching, but didn't stop and see what it was for.  I will look into that for sure.

I am still likely to build some sort of custom cart for this but in the meantime the DeWalt cart will let me get started.  As well, my simple solution (done by many others) of simply plumbing the outfeed into a DC bag will do as I see where I will go with things for a better solution.  As I said before, thank you all so much for the comments, suggestions and support!  I am learning so much about some things that I didn't know I wanted to know about haha!! 

Bench plane sharpening.....GO!!  LOL...It's like theoretical physics + politics!

Bill
A systainer of bits and bytes.

Offline Nailed IT

  • Posts: 27
Re: Wood Prep Tool Advice
« Reply #20 on: August 03, 2020, 10:32 AM »
Planer and stand arrived yesterday along with the Wixey. 

I certainly forgot how much I really don't care for the DeWalt stands.  Really miss old steel.  The new zinc garbage that most things are made of really sucks. It was also funny how the stand was modified to only use one bolt per leg for attachment to the bottom frame.  Cost cutting I guess. It's together and has wheels so all is good.



Next to unpack the planer, set it up and install the blades.  Hoping to have all my fingers when I finish!  Having watched a bunch of YouTube set up vids, if anyone has any setup recommendations please chime in!

Thanks again!

Bill
A systainer of bits and bytes.

Offline ear3

  • Posts: 4108
Re: Wood Prep Tool Advice
« Reply #21 on: August 03, 2020, 12:57 PM »
@Nailed IT Are you going to go with the Shelix?
Kapex KS 120 w/UG Cart and Extensions • CXS Set • T 18+3 w/Centrotec Installer's Set • PDC 18/4 • TID 18 • TS 75 • TSC 55 • HKC 55 w/250, 420 and 670 FSK rails • Carvex 420 w/Accessory Kit • Domino 500 Set • Domino 700 XL • OF 2200 w/Base Accessory Kit • OF 1400 • OF 1010 • MFK 700 EQ Set • LR 32 • MFS 400 w/2000, 1000, and 700 extensions • Rotex 90 • Rotex 150 • LS 130 • ETS-EC 150/5 • ETS-EC 150/3 • Pro 5 LTD • RTS 400 • RAS 115.04 • RS 2 • HL 850 • Vecturo OS 400 • AGC 18-115 • CT 26 w/BT module • CT Sys w/Long-Life Bag • MFT/3

Offline Nailed IT

  • Posts: 27
Re: Wood Prep Tool Advice
« Reply #22 on: August 03, 2020, 02:39 PM »
@Nailed IT Are you going to go with the Shelix?


If everything works out ok (unit works, it functions in my space and I am adequately adept at using it at all), I would plan to keep it and upgrade the cutting element sure!  I was looking that the Shelix and the Lux Cut.  I would be all for the benefits of cut, noise and maintenance.
A systainer of bits and bytes.

Offline ear3

  • Posts: 4108
Re: Wood Prep Tool Advice
« Reply #23 on: August 03, 2020, 03:29 PM »
As I said above, the Shelix is absolutely amazing in terms of performance, cutter life extension and noise reduction.  First time you chip the OEM knives you'll see what I mean.  I don't know however how the Shelix compares to the Lux Cut.  The only downside of the Shelix is that it does reduce the amount of material you can hog off per pass on wider boards, and it raises the minimum thickness you can plane down to from between 5/32 and 11/64, rather than 1/8.  I have never found this to be a huge inconvenience though.  Maybe the Lux Cut does a better job in those areas?
Kapex KS 120 w/UG Cart and Extensions • CXS Set • T 18+3 w/Centrotec Installer's Set • PDC 18/4 • TID 18 • TS 75 • TSC 55 • HKC 55 w/250, 420 and 670 FSK rails • Carvex 420 w/Accessory Kit • Domino 500 Set • Domino 700 XL • OF 2200 w/Base Accessory Kit • OF 1400 • OF 1010 • MFK 700 EQ Set • LR 32 • MFS 400 w/2000, 1000, and 700 extensions • Rotex 90 • Rotex 150 • LS 130 • ETS-EC 150/5 • ETS-EC 150/3 • Pro 5 LTD • RTS 400 • RAS 115.04 • RS 2 • HL 850 • Vecturo OS 400 • AGC 18-115 • CT 26 w/BT module • CT Sys w/Long-Life Bag • MFT/3

Offline Nailed IT

  • Posts: 27
Re: Wood Prep Tool Advice
« Reply #24 on: August 04, 2020, 09:30 AM »
As I said above, the Shelix is absolutely amazing in terms of performance, cutter life extension and noise reduction.  First time you chip the OEM knives you'll see what I mean.  I don't know however how the Shelix compares to the Lux Cut.  The only downside of the Shelix is that it does reduce the amount of material you can hog off per pass on wider boards, and it raises the minimum thickness you can plane down to from between 5/32 and 11/64, rather than 1/8.  I have never found this to be a huge inconvenience though.  Maybe the Lux Cut does a better job in those areas?

I have heard great things about the spiral cutter upgrades.  Although, there was mention of the original Shelix being of a smaller diameter to allow for installation without removal of the individual cutter blades, but they now offer a "full" size that does require  blade removal. The Lux Cut was supposed to be a bit more rust resistant as well as a bit easier to seat each of the cutters.

Here is one of the videos I ran across that explains those differences. 


Ironically the Lux Cut seems to be a bit more expensive now than the Shelix.  I would assume with proper care the Shelix would likely be fine.  These decisions are hard to make from looking at pictures.  You usually have to purchase and find out by experience.

Bill
A systainer of bits and bytes.

Online Cheese

  • Posts: 7527
Re: Wood Prep Tool Advice
« Reply #25 on: August 04, 2020, 10:02 AM »
The reason I purchased a Byrd Shelix was because they were the original OEM supplier to several of the machine tool manucfacturers. Also their products are made in the USA...Kentucky.

Just as an example they make Shelix cutter heads that fit everything from a 6" Delta jointer to a 36" Buss planer. Byrd manufactures over 300 different combinations so they are a known commodity, they'll be around for a while.  [big grin]

There's free shipping and if you sign up for the news letter, you'll receive 5% off.

https://byrdtoolexperts.com/product-category/dewalt-planers-and-jointers

I ordered mine from Holbren with new bearings and a few extra inserts. Free shipping also.

https://www.holbren.com/byrd-shelix-for-dewalt-planers/

Offline rvieceli

  • Posts: 1224
Re: Wood Prep Tool Advice
« Reply #26 on: August 04, 2020, 10:50 AM »
Byrd makes two heads for the DeWalt 735. One is the smaller size head and one is the same size as the original head.

My understanding of the problem with the oem size head is that the holes to insert the head into the machine are sized to just accept the head then the knives are installed.

So in order to get the bigger Shelix head to fit you have to remove all the inserts then reinstall them.

The smaller diameter Shelix fits without having to remove the inserts.

Ron

Offline ear3

  • Posts: 4108
Re: Wood Prep Tool Advice
« Reply #27 on: August 04, 2020, 11:33 AM »
Huh, is this a recent development?  I did not see two options when I purchased mine (by process of elimination I got the smaller one, as I did not have to remove the cutterheads).

BTW @Nailed IT I found a torque screwdriver very useful for rotating and/or changing out the cutters, since the specs call for 45lb/in. tight.  I got the Wera one.  I initially balked at the price, since prior to this I didn't really have a need for finely torqued driving, but it has definitely proved its worth for just this application.

Installing the Shelix was definitely a full morning's worth of work, but I found the instructions in this pair of videos to be an indispensable supplement to the manual





In particular, it soothed my nerves in the last stages when it confirmed the extended hammer tapping it takes to get the head fully seated. 



Byrd makes two heads for the DeWalt 735. One is the smaller size head and one is the same size as the original head.

My understanding of the problem with the oem size head is that the holes to insert the head into the machine are sized to just accept the head then the knives are installed.

So in order to get the bigger Shelix head to fit you have to remove all the inserts then reinstall them.

The smaller diameter Shelix fits without having to remove the inserts.

Ron
Kapex KS 120 w/UG Cart and Extensions • CXS Set • T 18+3 w/Centrotec Installer's Set • PDC 18/4 • TID 18 • TS 75 • TSC 55 • HKC 55 w/250, 420 and 670 FSK rails • Carvex 420 w/Accessory Kit • Domino 500 Set • Domino 700 XL • OF 2200 w/Base Accessory Kit • OF 1400 • OF 1010 • MFK 700 EQ Set • LR 32 • MFS 400 w/2000, 1000, and 700 extensions • Rotex 90 • Rotex 150 • LS 130 • ETS-EC 150/5 • ETS-EC 150/3 • Pro 5 LTD • RTS 400 • RAS 115.04 • RS 2 • HL 850 • Vecturo OS 400 • AGC 18-115 • CT 26 w/BT module • CT Sys w/Long-Life Bag • MFT/3

Offline rvieceli

  • Posts: 1224
Re: Wood Prep Tool Advice
« Reply #28 on: August 04, 2020, 11:59 AM »