Author Topic: What - non Festool - tool / workshop related gizmo/stuff did you buy today?  (Read 190186 times)

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Online FestitaMakool

  • Posts: 1302
Makita guide rail connectors. It appears to be a new version. Part no: 198885-7
Spotted these on my visit to the equivalent Home Depot here..

Two steel plates permanently connected with rivets. They seems to work very well, some adjustment is allowed. Nice that they stay in one piece, apart from that hex key.. one day.. [big grin] These won’t dent or mar your rails at least.
These could be used in conjunction with the new self adjusting Festool connectors or TSO’s self adjusting. Using these on the top t-track and the self adjusting ones on the main saw track.



« Last Edit: November 20, 2021, 04:03 PM by FestitaMakool »
“The Stig” Yes, it is true, at least some part of it..
“If you have an old Land Rover and a fit wife, you’re most likely always busy”

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Offline ChuckS

  • Posts: 3511
A revolving shelving unit from Uline, being the most price-competitive source in Canada, based on my research.

Offline ChuckS

  • Posts: 3511
Another online order arrived: a crock pot for warming up my Old Brown Glue, which I use for certain projects. I saw that use by American Antique Furniture Restorer Tom Johnson. His hide glue pot broke down, and he has been using OBG in the interim.
« Last Edit: November 29, 2021, 08:57 PM by ChuckS »

Offline waho6o9

  • Posts: 1674
    • Garage Door Handyman.com
338104-0

I bought the Joker ratcheting set today. 

Offline MrToolJunkie

  • Posts: 3000
I went full throttle on new PB Swiss and Knipex tools - nothing delivered yet, so nothing to post...but great discounts at Tool Lady and KC Tools for Black Friday and Cyber Monday. Cannot wait to get the goodies in the mail!

Offline ChuckS

  • Posts: 3511
Just arrived from the UK: Stripping knives (UK made), and palette knife (Italian product) which I use for applying glue/veneer repairs. Total order - $14 Cdn including (two-week) shipping.

It would have cost me about $20 Cdn just for the palette knife from Amazon (shipped from the States).

Jackson's Art Supplies offers many other British/EU affordable, finishing related supplies.

Online FestitaMakool

  • Posts: 1302
Curiosity got me, I found a new brand of measuring tools nearby.

Had to give it a go, price vice a bargain if they hold up.
1 Combo square from Empire
1 Carpenter square also from Empire.
Both are square after initial checks. However the combo square has a cast locking pin.. aka no steel one like Starrett. I’m curious if it holds up  [huh]. Other than that both squares gives a very good impression.



“The Stig” Yes, it is true, at least some part of it..
“If you have an old Land Rover and a fit wife, you’re most likely always busy”

Offline twistsol

  • Posts: 36
  • A shop full of tools and no talent
    • The Sawdustzone
Picked up a 2022 Nissan Frontier to tow my trailer full of Festool. I can't get a trailer hitch installed for a couple of weeks, so the trailer is on holiday until then.

Offline GoingMyWay

  • Posts: 1697
I picked up some waste-side cut jigs, vacuum hose/cable clips, and dust covers for the TS55 and 75 from Strawbyte Workshop before Christmas.



Today my order from Woodcraft arrived.  I ordered some epoxy, my first ever cabinet/card scraper set, a burnisher, 151 spokeshave, some chisel guards, and a Fisch brad point bit set because it was on sale ($43 off until 1/31/2022).

Inquiring Minds Want to Know

TS55, CT26, RO150, CXS, ETS 150/3, ETS EC 150/5, MFT/3, TS75, DF500, DTS400, OF1400, CT SYS

Offline ChuckS

  • Posts: 3511
What a coincidence. I also bought a set of lipped brad point drill bits - https://www.leevalley.com/en-ca/shop/tools/power-tool-accessories/drill-bits/42247-hss-lipped-imperial-brad-point-drills

I've used the metric lipped bits, and was impressed with the results.
« Last Edit: January 14, 2022, 05:57 PM by ChuckS »

Offline SRSemenza

  • Global Moderator
  • *
  • Posts: 9945
  • Finger Lakes Region, NY State , USA
I picked up some waste-side cut jigs, vacuum hose/cable clips, and dust covers for the TS55 and 75 from Strawbyte Workshop before Christmas.



Today my order from Woodcraft arrived.  I ordered some epoxy, my first ever cabinet/card scraper set, a burnisher, 151 spokeshave, some chisel guards, and a Fisch brad point bit set because it was on sale ($43 off until 1/31/2022).


The Fisch brad points are really nice! They cut clean and fast.

Seth

Offline notenoughcash

  • Posts: 244
  • too many ideas, not enough cash....
makita DHS680z.  and a 100 quid gift card for axminster

what a birthday
turns out that woodworking is 1% making things you'll use, 4% making bespoke high end firewood, 15% cleaning, and 80% looking for the blinking thing you just put down
PSC 420 EB, TSC 55 REB, CTL MIDI I

Offline notenoughcash

  • Posts: 244
  • too many ideas, not enough cash....
and with that 100 quid axi card, i got a powered wetstone grinder and some 2500g scary sharp paper
turns out that woodworking is 1% making things you'll use, 4% making bespoke high end firewood, 15% cleaning, and 80% looking for the blinking thing you just put down
PSC 420 EB, TSC 55 REB, CTL MIDI I

Offline Woodboss

  • Posts: 21
Lie Nielsen block plane

Offline DynaGlide

  • Posts: 1377
I went down a Knipex rabbit hole:

Instagram @matts.garage

Offline DynaGlide

  • Posts: 1377
Makita guide rail connectors. It appears to be a new version. Part no: 198885-7
Spotted these on my visit to the equivalent Home Depot here..

Two steel plates permanently connected with rivets. They seems to work very well, some adjustment is allowed. Nice that they stay in one piece, apart from that hex key.. one day.. [big grin] These won’t dent or mar your rails at least.
These could be used in conjunction with the new self adjusting Festool connectors or TSO’s self adjusting. Using these on the top t-track and the self adjusting ones on the main saw track.

(Attachment Link) (Attachment Link)
(Attachment Link) (Attachment Link)

@FestitaMakool I have the older version of those. They're great.
Instagram @matts.garage

Offline SRSemenza

  • Global Moderator
  • *
  • Posts: 9945
  • Finger Lakes Region, NY State , USA
I went down a Knipex rabbit hole:


It is less of a rabbit hole and more like they get a grip on you.  ::)

You'll be posting about every week or so with your latest Knipex purchase.  [big grin]

After never having had any good pliers I bought a pair of Knipex needle nose ...............  I don't dare count how many I have now.  [blink]

Seth

Offline DynaGlide

  • Posts: 1377
I went down a Knipex rabbit hole:


It is less of a rabbit hole and more like they get a grip on you.  ::)

You'll be posting about every week or so with your latest Knipex purchase.  [big grin]

After never having had any good pliers I bought a pair of Knipex needle nose ...............  I don't dare count how many I have now.  [blink]

Seth

I'm thinking I should toss my old junk ones. I can't believe how nice these are in comparison.

I hang onto old vice grips that I need to abuse with a BFH on occasion.
Instagram @matts.garage

Online FestitaMakool

  • Posts: 1302
Makita guide rail connectors. It appears to be a new version. Part no: 198885-7
Spotted these on my visit to the equivalent Home Depot here..

Two steel plates permanently connected with rivets. They seems to work very well, some adjustment is allowed. Nice that they stay in one piece, apart from that hex key.. one day.. [big grin] These won’t dent or mar your rails at least.
These could be used in conjunction with the new self adjusting Festool connectors or TSO’s self adjusting. Using these on the top t-track and the self adjusting ones on the main saw track.

(Attachment Link) (Attachment Link)
(Attachment Link) (Attachment Link)

@FestitaMakool I have the older version of those. They're great.

Thanks, yes so I’ve heard. The two piece design with press fit rather than screws that dig-fit like Festool’s. I don’t understand why Festool haven’t changed until now (though, one of the kit connectors are just like the old) I’m sure all of you are experiencing that any “adjustment” or fastening screw, sort of like the screw for the pointer needle on tools which most times are of soft steel or plastic that the screw head dig into. Make that tiny calibration or adjustment, and the screw pops right back to its former seating.. [huh]
“The Stig” Yes, it is true, at least some part of it..
“If you have an old Land Rover and a fit wife, you’re most likely always busy”

Online Cheese

  • Posts: 9676
What are those blue things?

I've been having some issues with the Morse taper in the metal lathe and because it's a small MT1 taper it's pretty difficult to clean. With the drill press using a MT3 taper it's fairly easy to clean out, but the smaller tapers are difficult because you don't want to scratch the inner tapered surface.

These are injection molded plastic with felt pads attached. I'll use them with some isopropyl and we'll see how much gunk they remove. They're referred to as Big Kaiser spindle cleaners.


Offline 4nthony

  • Posts: 255
    • Slack for Recon Tools
I recently learned that Class 1 tape measures were a thing, so curiosity got the best of me and I ordered a 3 meter Hultafors. In some non-scientific tests (hooking the tape to a Woodpeckers 900mm rule and seeing where the marks line up), it doesn't appear to be any more accurate than my Fastcap. Neither of them match up to the rule when there's tension on the hook, but the marks on the tapes are perfectly matched across all three. I won't be marking out dovetails any time soon so I think I'll be ok using them [cool]



Recon Tool Notifications

Anthony

"The best way to get a correct answer on the internet is to post an obviously wrong answer and wait for someone to correct you." - Kevin Kelly

Offline ChuckS

  • Posts: 3511
The only tape measure that's good for me is the SAME tape that is used throughout the same project/same measurement. The classes don't matter to me. Most of my tape measures (even with the same brand or from the same source) don't align with each other, or with the tape on my SawStop.

Offline Stan Tillinghast

  • Posts: 295
I found myself working in northern California at our family home; I had brought my old-style Vecturo and my ETS/EC 125/150.
Had the need to do some detail sanding; ordered a Starlock adapter from Amazon but it wasn’t going to arrive until too late. So I found myself ordering a Makita MXT04 multi tool and charger/battery along with a Starlock sanding pad. Why the Makita? Because I have a bunch of. Other XLT 18V tools.
The reviews of the MXT04 emphasized low vibration; I didn’t realize how big a deal that was until I started using the new multi tool with the sanding pad. Really an astonishingly low level of vibration, and the tool did the job on the detail sanding, while the ETS/EC 125 was great on the flat surfaces.
The whole Makita kit with battery, charger, and Starlock sanding pad was about 350, which is about 1/2 the cost of the cordless Vecturo. I haven’t cut anything with it yet, and it doesn’t have the depth cut and square cut accessories of the Vecturo, but I have those with my old corded Vecturo.
Für uns...ist das Beste gerade gut genug!

Offline MikeGE

  • Posts: 329
After getting tired of fighting with the Holzmann HOB260NL jointer/planer (planer/thicknesser) for nearly two years, I bought a Minimax FS 30G with the three-knife Tersa head.  It arrived on Friday and I'm waiting on a friend to come over and help me move it to the basement.

If I can't find a new home for the HOB260NL, I'll haul it to the metal reclamation yard (I'm serious).  If anyone in the greater Frankfurt area is interested, it's free for collection.  It is the only machine I regret buying.



Online FestitaMakool

  • Posts: 1302
Hi Mike,
Interesting.. having seen these Holzmann machines marketed here quite frequently, I had the joy of reading from the dealers ad: “A compact and reliable combination planer and thicknesser for the small workshop, easy and quick to convert between the two functions”.

They look all right, although my scepticism to brands that I don’t know of have put me off.
I tend to ask around pro’s which brand to look for as a hobbyist. Usually I get straight honest answers. (As the guy who where selling his MFK 700 and I was curious, he told me to keep using my Makita for roundovers. So he sold it to another guy..)

But Minimax has caught my eye, when I grow up I’d like to have a look at a combination machine, preferably with a slider. Hope you let us know how you like your new machine!
“The Stig” Yes, it is true, at least some part of it..
“If you have an old Land Rover and a fit wife, you’re most likely always busy”

Offline MikeGE

  • Posts: 329
Hi FestitaMakool,

I was just starting to outfit my workshop when I bought the Holzmann machine.  My purchase was based solely on what was in stock and what looked like it might function.  I wanted to buy machines from Axminster in the UK, but they would not ship to Germany, so I bought local.  The Holzmann is manufactured to a price point and as delivered, it is not possible to adjust the infeed and outfeed tables to make them coplanar.  Each table has two steel pins on the hinge side that lock it in position and prevent the adjusters from working.  Removing the pins allows the tables to be adjusted.  In fact, I removed the adjuster bolts as an experiment and the tables didn't budge.  There is no mention of these pins in the owner's manual, so they are not transit pins to be removed.

The thicknesser table changes alignment with the cutter block with minor changes to the height adjustment, and locking the table in place changes the alignment again, but the change is not consistent.  For example, passing a board through the thicknesser at 50mm might result in one side being 49mm thick and the other side being 51mm thick.  Adjusting the table for a thickness of 48 mm might result in the previous thicker side now being thinner and the thin side being thicker.  Measuring the thickness after a cut is almost better than a random number generator.  I gave up trying to use a Wixey DRO on the thicknesser because the table tilt was too random.

There are several versions of this machine from other manufacturers that appear to share the same factory...with the same faults.  I will be very disappointed if the Minimax suffers from any of these problems, but am confident it will be fine based on the quality of the other SCM machine I own.

When I was looking for a table saw, I wanted a decent cabinet saw, but was not able to find any in Germany.  The choices were contractor saws or larger sliders.  I was leaning towards the Hammer K3 Winner or Basic; however, after talking to the sales rep, I changed my mind and bought the Minimax SC2C.  The Hammer would take between 90 and 120 days before it was ready to ship and I would have to make my own arrangements for shipping and commissioning.  The Minimax was in stock at the distributor (also my Festool source) and the price, which was nearly the same as the Hammer, included delivery, assembly, and commissioning.  I bought the FS 30G from the same distributor.

My selection of tools is based on the ability to navigate down the stairs to the basement shop, either in whole or in part.  The SC2C was delivered in parts, but I had to disassemble it more by separating the cast iron table from the chassis and removing the concrete counter balance in order to be able to move it.  I reassembled the chassis when it was in the basement.  I didn't tell the commissioning technician that I had taken it apart, but he knew.  He told me the wiring harness was dressed better than it was when it left the factory.

Offline GoingMyWay

  • Posts: 1697
I bought a little Stabila level that came with a holster from Amazon.  Yesterday I went to Lowes to buy a Dremel.  I thought being cordless would be more versatile so I decided on the 8220 model.  I later learned it can work with the same Bosch 12V batteries that I have from my Bosch Flexidrill (requires a slight modification).  I also grabbed a retractable pencil, a Purdy folding 10 in 1 painters tool, a Lenox folding jab knife, a Hillman Bolt, Nut, and Screw Gauge, and a pair of Knipex Cobra Pliers.

Inquiring Minds Want to Know

TS55, CT26, RO150, CXS, ETS 150/3, ETS EC 150/5, MFT/3, TS75, DF500, DTS400, OF1400, CT SYS

Offline Holzhacker

  • Posts: 1035
    • www.aic-chicago.com
darn FOG
with the bridge city tools sale posted on the Fog the other day I broke down and put in an order. Ordered a couple squares and the center scribe.
I've wanted the center scribe for a long time but ~ $300 wasn't a realistic option. Been watching fleabay as well but the old rosewood and brass ones go for quite a bit. At $169 it was a more reasonable purchase.
"The Code is not a ceiling to reach but a floor to work up from"

Offline 4nthony

  • Posts: 255
    • Slack for Recon Tools
I picked up some waste-side cut jigs, vacuum hose/cable clips, and dust covers for the TS55 and 75 from Strawbyte Workshop before Christmas.



I just learned about these waste-side cut jigs. Hey @GoingMyWay how are they working out for you? Are you finding them to be useful, or is it one of those things that are quickly forgotten and end up in drawer?

I finally picked up an oscillating belt sander as I'm hoping to get cleaner edges on my templates.

This -- or, the previous version anyway -- seems to be one of the most popular tools I see in people's workshops and the reviews I've read and watched tend to be overwhelmingly positive. Interestingly, the new version is $20 cheaper than the old version. Less plastic, I suppose.

Recon Tool Notifications

Anthony

"The best way to get a correct answer on the internet is to post an obviously wrong answer and wait for someone to correct you." - Kevin Kelly

Offline Richard/RMW

  • Posts: 2243
Skilsaw, for steel.



One thing leads to another, needed its own "guide rail"...









Whomped up from some 1/4" plate and flat bar.

RMW

As of 10/17 I am out of the Dog business and pursuing other distractions. Thanks for a fun ride!