Author Topic: What - non Festool - tool / workshop related gizmo/stuff did you buy today?  (Read 254964 times)

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Offline Bugsysiegals

  • Posts: 906
I've never seen or heard of that High Bot. Somewhere between the others. I really loved the Glu Bot when I was working in the assembly area of the cabinet shop. They work great for "injecting" glue into dowel holes, during assembly of cabinets. A simple squeeze gets you a pretty "measured" amount of glue and then it retracts rather than dripping.

Of the three sizes, I find the smallest the most valuable addition to my shop, because it offers full control in situations where you want to dispense only a small amount of glue. It's for small glue-up jobs, such as applying glue into 4mm domino mortises.

If lots of glue is desired, why not just go with the original glue bottle? I, therefore, would recommend the smallest size (baby bot) to people who want to try the Glu Bot. Be sure to clean the tip after a couple of uses as it'll clog or gum up.

My shop cabinets were assembled with dominos and titebond 3 dries so quickly I could hardly squeeze the glue and brush it into all the domino holes and on the dominos per piece that next time I might just use dado joints.  Nonetheless, I could see this helping to get into the little areas nicely but I was most impressed that you can hold the bottle upright rather than the regular bottle needing to be upside down ... I suspect this will have some advantages...

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Offline Michael Kellough

  • Posts: 5888
@Bugsysiegals  since you are talking about cabinets I assume you are joining sheet goods or adding face frames to sheet goods so there is a joint between parts. Dedicate your time to putting glue on the joint, gluing Dominos is secondary, maybe even unnecessary.

Offline ChuckS

  • Posts: 4275

My shop cabinets were assembled with dominos and titebond 3 dries so quickly I could hardly squeeze the glue and brush it into all the domino holes and on the dominos per piece that next time I might just use dado joints.Snip.
When I have lots of dominoes to do, I use one of these two methods:

A) Working Alone

1) Apply glue to all the mortises on one piece and its edge if applicable
2) Apply glue to half of domino and hammer it into the wet mortise
3) Repeat 2) until all dominoes are inserted into the first piece
4) Apply glue to the edge, if applicable, of the mating piece
5) Apply glue on the dry part of all the dominoes
6) Clamp the two pieces together, if it's just two pieces.

I use Lee Valley cabinetmaker's glue or TBIII, and never have had glue freezing up on me. Glue tends to dry up more quickly if too little is applied to the surface. (If long working time is needed,Old Brown Glue or thinned PVA may be my choice of adhesive.)

B) For really taxing glue-ups involving many many dominoes, colder shop environment, clamping cauls, large builds, and the use of glue size (for endgrain), I get help from my shop assistant (aka my wife). Just make sure that you explain to your shop assistant beforehand what to do or where to help.

« Last Edit: December 05, 2022, 03:02 PM by ChuckS »

Offline Crazyraceguy

  • Posts: 2368
ChuckS, back when I was doing that everyday, I would use an entire bottle's worth from the big Glubot in a single day. At the volume I was using, I would never have considered the baby one.
I still use one of the big ones, but not exclusively. I use the regular condiment-type bottles most of the time.

Not today, but Saturday afternoon, I git a Bosch laser measuring device. It's just the smaller, indoor, short-range unit, but it's pretty cool. 
CSX
DF500 + assortment set
PS420 + Base kit
OF1010
OF1010F
OF1400
MFK700 (2)
TS55, FS1080, FS1400/ LR32, FS1900, FS 2424/ LR32, FS3000
CT26E + Workshop cleaning set, Bluetooth remote
CT15
RO90
RO125
ETS EC 125
RAS115
ETS 125 (2)
RTS 400
TS75
Shaper Origin/Workstation/Plate
MFT clamps set
Installers set
Centrotech organizer set
Socket/Ratchet set
Pliers set

Offline ChuckS

  • Posts: 4275
ChuckS, back when I was doing that everyday, I would use an entire bottle's worth from the big Glubot in a single day. At the volume I was using, I would never have considered the baby one.
I still use one of the big ones, but not exclusively. I use the regular condiment-type bottles most of the time.

Not today, but Saturday afternoon, I git a Bosch laser measuring device. It's just the smaller, indoor, short-range unit, but it's pretty cool.
Agreed. The baby bot, as the name suggests, is good for small jobs only. The glue flow is too small and slow for big glue-ups.
« Last Edit: December 05, 2022, 08:44 PM by ChuckS »

Offline squall_line

  • Posts: 1728
Not today, but Saturday afternoon, I git a Bosch laser measuring device. It's just the smaller, indoor, short-range unit, but it's pretty cool.

Are you following me and/or hacking my browser history?  I was looking at those on Saturday myself!

I purchased one at my old job (the 50C unit) and used it along with the app to measure rooms and annotate photos with measurements to produce sketchup drawings of outlets and doors, and was looking for a personal unit to diagram my house to record all of the circuits in my breaker panel and draw up plans for some updates, and noticed that only the highest-end units have Bluetooth now, for almost double what I paid 3 1/2 years ago.

Alternately, I was trying to use Canvas with my iPad Pro's LiDAR to scan my house to get the same thing.  I may just go back to the old fashioned "write down the dimensions and draw it up from scratch" method of putting it all together...

Online Packard

  • Posts: 1926
I have had my DeWalt 611 for a while now, but yesterday was the first time I’ve used the plunge base and the DeWalt track attachment to router dadoes.

I usually use my table saw and a stacked dado head to make dadoes.  I often spend 15 minutes on the setup getting the fit to the plywood “just right”. 

I bought a set (my second set, the first one in 1/2” shank) of Whiteside dado bits for “undersized plywood”.  I had to familiarize myself with the plunge base as well as with the track attachment.  The second sample went well.  Happily, I no longer have to get the fit “just right” so setup is vastly quicker.  (It is a good bit looser than I would make using the dado head.)

I will probably use it where there is not visual inspection available for the dado fit.  In this case, I am making a wall mounted bedside table (16” 16” x 6”) and I wanted a solid back
solidly afixed which will be set in the dado slot.

So, clearly that dado slot will not be visible, and this is a good application for the pre-sized dado bits.

The track adapter works OK.  It does not slide as smoothly as I imagined.  Unlike the saw that is entirely supported by the track and slides easily, only the adapter is supported by the track and the friction between the router base and the stock governs how easily it will slide. 

I imagine dado slots in melamine clad material would slide more easily, but that material is not “undersized” and the bits would not make dadoes large enough to accommodate the material.

Ah.  No one said that woodworking was going to be easy.

Offline luvmytoolz

  • Posts: 395
A while ago I bought a Virutex abrasive planer that has proven incredibly useful, and able to do some work that would be almost impossible with any other tool. One of the tool suppliers has a special on, so I added the curved abrasive planer to my workshop now!

No doubt it's possibly not as good a build quality as the Makita curved planer, but this will do convex as well as concave curves of any diameter, whereas I think the Makita only does concave curves, and it's half the cost. The straight planer has done a massive amount of work to date, and done it easily and more than satisfactorily, so I'll be very pleased with this one I'm sure.

https://beyondtools.com/products/700w-curved-abrasive-planer-ce123n

 

Offline pettyconstruction

  • Posts: 688
I got the silliest little thing today, but it's so handy. Quite often, I use both the DF500 and Zeta at the same time, or the TS55 and DF500 together. Swapping the extractor hose back and forth is no big deal, they are at the tool-end. Changing the plug every time gets old real quick. And it never fails that the wrong one is plugged in.
While shopping for some wire management clips, I came across this, for a whopping $3.

I keep one of these 3-way outlets plugged into all 3 CT's. Especially handy when I'm sanding.

(Attachment Link)
That’s what I do also,
Charlie


Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk Pro

Offline Cheese

  • Posts: 10295
Re: What non Festool tool did you buy today? Betterley GRABO Adapter
« Reply #1119 on: December 09, 2022, 02:14 PM »
Betterley just released in October, an adapter that attaches the Grabo to the Festool guide rail. The Grabo has a self contained, battery powered vacuum pump on-board to maintain a safe vacuum level at all times. I've used the Grabo to lift and replace New York bluestone pavers in the patio. I've also attached the Grabo to textured plaster walls.




Here it's supporting a guide rail on a painted door. The Betterley adapted easily fits inside the Grabo carry bag.






Offline woodbutcherbower

  • Posts: 613
I'd love to have the problem of TB3 drying too quickly. I'm standing here in an mostly-unheated shop, the temperature is -6C/20F, and the glue is unusable because it chalks and won't bond at these temperatures. a woodburning stove is in here, but doesn't burn 24/7 because I occasionally have to sleep.  I'm having to use PU which I hate with a passion. Every coat of oil-based finish I apply to anything takes 3 days to dry = and I do this for a living. Be careful what you wish for .........
« Last Edit: December 09, 2022, 04:50 PM by woodbutcherbower »

Offline Crazyraceguy

  • Posts: 2368
At those kinds of temperatures your glue is freezing rather than drying. You really need some kind of self-feeding stove, like a pellet burner. It can stay running all night. The only down-side to them is that they need electricity. The feed auger and blowers need power, so they aren't as simple as an actual wood burner. They can however maintain a more consistent temp and run un-assisted.
CSX
DF500 + assortment set
PS420 + Base kit
OF1010
OF1010F
OF1400
MFK700 (2)
TS55, FS1080, FS1400/ LR32, FS1900, FS 2424/ LR32, FS3000
CT26E + Workshop cleaning set, Bluetooth remote
CT15
RO90
RO125
ETS EC 125
RAS115
ETS 125 (2)
RTS 400
TS75
Shaper Origin/Workstation/Plate
MFT clamps set
Installers set
Centrotech organizer set
Socket/Ratchet set
Pliers set

Offline guybo

  • Posts: 488
At those kinds of temperatures your glue is freezing rather than drying. You really need some kind of self-feeding stove, like a pellet burner. It can stay running all night. The only down-side to them is that they need electricity.
none needed w/ this

Offline SRSemenza

  • Global Moderator
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  • Posts: 10139
  • Finger Lakes Region, NY State , USA
Spiral router bit topic is  HERE


Seth

Online Packard

  • Posts: 1926
Re: What non Festool tool did you buy today? Betterley GRABO Adapter
« Reply #1124 on: December 10, 2022, 01:22 PM »
Betterley just released in October, an adapter that attaches the Grabo to the Festool guide rail. The Grabo has a self contained, battery powered vacuum pump on-board to maintain a safe vacuum level at all times. I've used the Grabo to lift and replace New York bluestone pavers in the patio. I've also attached the Grabo to textured plaster walls.

(Attachment Link)


Here it's supporting a guide rail on a painted door. The Betterley adapted easily fits inside the Grabo carry bag.

(Attachment Link)

(Attachment Link)

(Attachment Link)

I never saw or heard about the Grabo until I saw this post yesterday. This morning, while eating breakfast I was watching a home remodeling show and they had 3 men installing a marble slab to face a kitchen exhaust system.  They all had one or two of these.  I saw the guy just tap a button and lift.

They were lifting overhead so more challenging than most slab installs. It looked thicker than normal slabs— maybe 1.25” or 1.5”.  So 150 to 180 pounds. (There is an online slab weight calculator—I checked.). Impressive piece.

Aside:  I walked into the local Starbucks and the baristas were very upset.  Someone on the drive through picked up his latte and grabbed the tip container and drove off.

I said, “I know how to remedy that problem.  Give me a spare tip container and a few days and I will return with a theft-resistant tip jar.” I mounted the tip jar on a piece of oak and added two lever-lock suction cups to anchor it. 

It’s been a couple of years.  I will have to ask how it is standing up.

The holding power was such that you would shatter the acrylic container before it let loose.

They mount and remove it each shift.  Do suction cups wear out?

Offline Cheese

  • Posts: 10295
Re: What non Festool tool did you buy today? Betterley GRABO Adapter
« Reply #1125 on: December 10, 2022, 02:07 PM »
They mount and remove it each shift.  Do suction cups wear out?

I'm sure they do, Wood's which has been around for years offers replacement vacuum pads for their lifters.

The thing about the Grabo is that it pumps down to .80 Bar and then monitors the vacuum condition and turns on again at some predetermined level. That 0.74 Bar that's shown in the 1st photo indicates the amount of vacuum that's present and it continues to monitor the decay rate/value.

I really like the safety aspect of the Grabo. The only way to lose vacuum is to lose battery charge.

« Last Edit: December 10, 2022, 02:21 PM by Cheese »

Offline rvieceli

  • Posts: 1859
Wanted to try out some round plugs, so I picked up this CMT Orange Tools plug cutter. They come in several sizes, I got the 3/4 inch one. Works great I run it at about 300 rpm’s as per the instructions. Makes a nice clean sided plug that fits perfectly in a 3/4 hole from my Famag Forstner. Highly recommended if you need something similar.

Ron





« Last Edit: December 12, 2022, 12:40 PM by rvieceli »

Offline Coen

  • Posts: 1976
Re: What non Festool tool did you buy today? Betterley GRABO Adapter
« Reply #1127 on: December 12, 2022, 12:38 PM »
Do suction cups wear out?

Oh yessss. I can tell you some stories about steel plates dropping to the floor. Although usually it involved the operator ignoring the audible alarm that indicated insufficient vacuum.

Offline Cheese

  • Posts: 10295
Makes a nice clean sided plug that fits perfectly in a 3/4 hole from my Famag Forstner. Highly recommended if you need something similar.

A beautiful fit Ron considering they're not even tapered. There's a whole lot of synergy going on there between the Famag bit and the CMT bit.  [thumbs up]  Nice to know...

Offline Frank-Jan

  • Posts: 1304
  • Dutch Canadian living in Belgium
Ron, I just saw those when I went to a local hardware store to get some stuff. I forgot to check the price there.

I have a similar plug cutter made by heller for 15mm plugs, and I use it with a centrotec zobo drill, works great. I remember the heller drill being pricey 10 years ago. (over 150€)

Offline Crazyraceguy

  • Posts: 2368
I asked the purchasing guy to get me a couple of 1/4 down spiral router bits, to replace the worn-out ones I had. He got me these fancy nano-coated things, we'll see how they do.
CSX
DF500 + assortment set
PS420 + Base kit
OF1010
OF1010F
OF1400
MFK700 (2)
TS55, FS1080, FS1400/ LR32, FS1900, FS 2424/ LR32, FS3000
CT26E + Workshop cleaning set, Bluetooth remote
CT15
RO90
RO125
ETS EC 125
RAS115
ETS 125 (2)
RTS 400
TS75
Shaper Origin/Workstation/Plate
MFT clamps set
Installers set
Centrotech organizer set
Socket/Ratchet set
Pliers set

Online Packard

  • Posts: 1926
Wanted to try out some round plugs, so I picked up this CMT Orange Tools plug cutter. They come in several sizes, I got the 3/4 inch one. Works great I run it at about 300 rpm’s as per the instructions. Makes a nice clean sided plug that fits perfectly in a 3/4 hole from my Famag Forstner. Highly recommended if you need something similar.

Ron

(Attachment Link)

(Attachment Link)

(Attachment Link)

I’m going to need a 1/2” plug cutter for an upcoming project, so this was interesting.

The 1/2” cutter is $25.44 from Amazon.

I have four 3/8” diameter drill bits for my dowel jigs.  Each time I get a new batch of dowels, I have to test to see which bit to use as they all seem to make slightly different sized holes. 

I am hoping that the 1/2” diameter bit I have will work with the plug cutter.

Otherwise I will have to look at buying a Famag (but I use regular bits, not forstner bits.).

Has anyone used a plug planer?  I always used a chisel, but occasionally the plug would split slightly below the surface line and then I would have to dig it out or re-drill.  This would appear to eliminate that possibility.  But I doubt it would be any quicker.

From Amana Tool.  I have limited experience with Amana, but they have a good reputation.  $130.00 from Amazon.com.

https://www.amanatool.com/plp-100-carbide-tipped-non-marring-plug-planer-2-inch-dia-x-15mm-drill-dia-x-1-4-inch-quick-release-hex-shank.html



I’m thinking I can achieve the same result with my palm-sized plunge router.  I will have to experiment. 
« Last Edit: December 14, 2022, 09:43 AM by Packard »

Offline Michael Kellough

  • Posts: 5888
A hinge mortising bit in a small router with excellent depth adjustment like the OF 1100 does a very good job. In this use the very large opening in the OF 1100 is a benefit.

Offline Cheese

  • Posts: 10295
Re: What non Festool tool did you buy today? Amana Plug Planer
« Reply #1133 on: December 14, 2022, 10:39 AM »
Well where do I start Packard... [smile]

I prefer to use tapered plugs because they right the wrongs of plug diameter vs hole diameter. See my reply to Ron, reply 1129.

I'd also recommend to bore the hole diameter with a GOOD Forstner bit, that's one of the reasons why Ron's plug fits so well in the bored hole. A drill bit would give a horrible fit.

I've also had issues using a chisel so then I moved on to a Lie Nielsen chisel plane, I had issues with that also. I think part of the problem was, that I was trimming Jatoba (Brazilian Cherry) plugs which have a Janka hardness of 2690 lbs, that's about twice that of hard maple. Even taking small cuts, chip-out of the plugs was always a problem.

I now own the Amana Plug Planer, it works well. I adjust it so the wood plug is trimmed .003"-.004" proud of the surface. I then flush everything with a Festool ETS EC 125.

Be advised that the max plug diameter for the Amana tool is 1/2". The hole diameter in the plastic foot is 9/16" diameter. You simply attach the drill to the cutter, place the cutter over the plug, pull the trigger on the drill, lower the drill/spring loaded cutter until it bottoms on the adjustable stop. That's it...sand smooth.
« Last Edit: December 15, 2022, 09:33 AM by Cheese »

Offline Lincoln

  • Posts: 312
1 - A pair of new DeWalt Bolster safety boots. My fifth pair, each lasting me around a year both onsite and in the shop before I wear right through the soles. Super-comfortable right out of the box, unlike all the others I ever tried.

2 - A subcompact Milwaukee 12v combi drill for my girlfriend. She's just bought her first house and she's very hands-on. I'm gradually gifting her all the DIY-level tools she's going to need. It's strangely satisfying to have been referred to as a 'power tool nerd' for many years - only to then catch her secretly compiling her own power tool wishlist ......

3 - A CNC-cut plywood handtools tote with 2 x drawers which fits inside a spare Sys4 T-Loc I had hanging around. My historical handtool storage (excepting expensive stuff like chisels, squares, block planes etc. etc.) has previously been embarrassingly chaotic, with everything just dumped into a Sys3.   

4 - A nice warm Hilti-branded beanie hat. It's getting cold.

5 - A bigger (1.5-litre) Stanley flask for coffee. It's getting really cold.

6 - Two 5-packs of Wera Impaktor PZ2 bits, plus one 5-pack of PZ3's.

7 - Four new Goodyear Eagle F1 235/45ZR18 101W tyres for the van - plus four replacement sets of discs/pads, plus a replacement set of rear bump stops, plus a new passenger-side door mirror glass, plus my regular 6000-mile oil and filter change, plus the annual MOT test (the UK equivalent of DOT I guess). Ouch. And you thought that Festools were expensive ???

And finally ......

5 A Mafell LS103EC chain mortiser to replace my ancient old Makita. Something I've been Jonesing after since forever, but never being able to justify. But now - three big oak framing jobs booked in for January/February/March, so it will pay for itself quickly. An absolute beast of a machine.

Kevin

@woodbutcherbower  - more info on the handtool totes, if you don't mind


Offline Lincoln

  • Posts: 312
« Last Edit: December 14, 2022, 05:34 PM by Lincoln »

Offline rvieceli

  • Posts: 1859
@Packard there is no way I would even attempt to use a a standard twist drill, I truly believe that a quality Forstner operated at a slower speed makes for a better hole.

I'm not using the plugs in the normal sense , ie to cover a screw in a countersunk hole. I'm using them like the inlays I use to cover insect damage or a crack or some flaw. The plugs I've used so far have been 3/4 inch by about 3/4 to an inch long.

The pieces I'm using them on are small about 4.5x5x2.5 high. These are a royal pain to try to do a normal rectangular inlay on. The plug cutter and the bit allow me to pop over to the drill press and take care of it. Once I put some glue on them, it takes a clamp to get the plug to go in all the way. I usually take the piece over to the band saw and get the plug closer to flush and sand the remainder of with the ETS EC 150.

Here's a pic of the plugs overlapped.  [big grin]

Ron


« Last Edit: December 14, 2022, 05:49 PM by rvieceli »

Offline rst

  • Posts: 2892
Just received  WERA 05004283001 8009 ZYKLOP POCKET SET IMPERIAL 2 from Chadstoolbox.com

Offline Muttley000

  • Posts: 82
Added a felo posidrive screwdriver and jessem stock guides to my tablesaw fence this week
ETS EC 150
TS55 FEQ
CT 36