Author Topic: Wells index  (Read 2169 times)

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Offline WarnerConstCo.

  • Posts: 4112
    • Warner Mill Works
Wells index
« on: February 19, 2020, 07:44 PM »
Picking this up on Saturday.
It's a 745 Wells Index, r8, dro, power x and y, still made in the us, all parts still available.

It will go nicely with my 14x54 hendey and my g&l surface grinder.



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Offline WarnerConstCo.

  • Posts: 4112
    • Warner Mill Works
Re: Wells index
« Reply #1 on: February 21, 2020, 05:58 PM »
Go next to my 1945 Hendey.

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Offline kevinculle

  • Posts: 327
Re: Wells index
« Reply #2 on: February 21, 2020, 07:29 PM »
Two beautiful old beasts!

Offline Cheese

  • Posts: 7236
Re: Wells index
« Reply #3 on: February 21, 2020, 11:04 PM »
I'm impressed with the knee mill...it seems significantly more robust than a Bridgeport. And given that current new Bridgeports are running $35-$40K that seems like a good alternative. What's the weight?

Offline WarnerConstCo.

  • Posts: 4112
    • Warner Mill Works
Re: Wells index
« Reply #4 on: February 21, 2020, 11:12 PM »
I'm impressed with the knee mill...it seems significantly more robust than a Bridgeport. And given that current new Bridgeports are running $35-$40K that seems like a good alternative. What's the weight?
Wells start at 16k it says in their website.

Should be about 2200 pounds.

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Offline WarnerConstCo.

  • Posts: 4112
    • Warner Mill Works
Re: Wells index
« Reply #5 on: February 22, 2020, 08:18 PM »
I had other more important things to do, but I decided that now was the best time to clean this thing up. Don't make fun of my crappy Enco vise, a buddy gave it to me and it will do until I feel like spending 1k on a Kurt.

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Offline WarnerConstCo.

  • Posts: 4112
    • Warner Mill Works
Re: Wells index
« Reply #6 on: March 25, 2020, 11:49 AM »
Trammed mill yesterday, installed my new Kurt DX6 vise and trammed it.

Got stuff to make and repair for people.



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Offline Michael Kellough

  • Posts: 4728
Re: Wells index
« Reply #7 on: March 25, 2020, 11:58 AM »
Thanks for the pics! What does “trimmed” mean?

Offline WarnerConstCo.

  • Posts: 4112
    • Warner Mill Works
Re: Wells index
« Reply #8 on: March 25, 2020, 12:09 PM »
Thanks for the pics! What does “trimmed” mean?
Trammed.

I swept table with a test indicator mounted in my spindle across parallels I set on the table.

Since I loaded, hauled, unloaded and moved the machine I need to make sure the tilt and nod of the head were at 0.

Tramming is just indicating the head to table, and making sure vise is running parallel to the spindle as well.

Took me a few hours to get it to a little less than a half ten thousandth.

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Offline Birdhunter

  • Posts: 3004
  • Woodworker, Sportsman, Retired
Re: Wells index
« Reply #9 on: March 25, 2020, 02:11 PM »
I’ve gotten hooked on watching Abom79 YouTube videos so I recognize some of the machinery. He uses a Kurt vise. I had no idea they cost that much. I have a shop full of serious woodworking machines, but nothing like your monsters.
Birdhunter

Offline WarnerConstCo.

  • Posts: 4112
    • Warner Mill Works
Re: Wells index
« Reply #10 on: March 25, 2020, 02:29 PM »
I’ve gotten hooked on watching Abom79 YouTube videos so I recognize some of the machinery. He uses a Kurt vise. I had no idea they cost that much. I have a shop full of serious woodworking machines, but nothing like your monsters.
I used to watch more of his stuff, but like many others, has kinda turned into a bit of internet panhandling.  Always asking for follows, likes, subscribe to their patreon, buy their merchandise, etc. 

Actual good content is starting to lack and it's more and more like regular old TV.

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Offline Wooden Skye

  • Posts: 1165
  • My little girl was called home 12-28-15
Re: Wells index
« Reply #11 on: March 25, 2020, 04:03 PM »
Darcy, phenomenal job on the restoration as usual! 
Bryan

TS 55, (2) 1400 Guide Rails, 1900 Guide Rail, MFT/3, Domino DF 500, 2 domino systainers, ETS 150/3, RO 90, CT 26, (2) OF1400, RO 150. RTS 400, LR 32 set, PS300 jigsaw, 3 abrasive systainers, (2) sys toolbox, (2) sys mini, clamps and other accesories

Offline greg mann

  • Posts: 1884
Re: Wells index
« Reply #12 on: March 25, 2020, 06:04 PM »
I'm impressed with the knee mill...it seems significantly more robust than a Bridgeport. And given that current new Bridgeports are running $35-$40K that seems like a good alternative. What's the weight?

When I started they were about $2500, and had just jumped a bit.
Greg Mann
Oakland, Michigan

Offline RussellS

  • Posts: 295
Re: Wells index
« Reply #13 on: March 25, 2020, 06:31 PM »


It looks funny to have that computer control box sticking out the side of that "old time" looking machine.  But it is LED instead of I presume the more modern LCD.

Offline WarnerConstCo.

  • Posts: 4112
    • Warner Mill Works
Re: Wells index
« Reply #14 on: March 25, 2020, 06:34 PM »


It looks funny to have that computer control box sticking out the side of that "old time" looking machine.  But it is LED instead of I presume the more modern LCD.
It's not that old. Believe it's late 80s machine.
Never got around to calling index and finding out though.

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Offline WarnerConstCo.

  • Posts: 4112
    • Warner Mill Works
Re: Wells index
« Reply #15 on: March 25, 2020, 07:50 PM »
I would actually like to add a Z on my lathe. Only one I deem necessary.

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Offline DeformedTree

  • Posts: 755
Re: Wells index
« Reply #16 on: March 25, 2020, 08:35 PM »


It looks funny to have that computer control box sticking out the side of that "old time" looking machine.  But it is LED instead of I presume the more modern LCD.

The look of  a manual mill hasn't changed in ages. They all basically look the same.  Far as the readout, same deal, those all look the same since they came out, not sure when they showed up, probably in the 70s.

In general full machine shops are all CNC so this sort of equipment is basically worthless to them as makes no sense operating cost wise, other than having around for that occasional random task it makes sense.  Older CNCs are getting that way too, problem is you either have to know how to manually G code, or buy software that cost more than the machine you bought, though some open source options are out there now.  Thats where this kind of machine has value to normal folk, you pay for the machine and tools, and use it for life, no software issues. As long as your making basic geometry, you can do a lot with sort of thing pretty easy.


Offline WarnerConstCo.

  • Posts: 4112
    • Warner Mill Works
Re: Wells index
« Reply #17 on: March 25, 2020, 10:31 PM »


It looks funny to have that computer control box sticking out the side of that "old time" looking machine.  But it is LED instead of I presume the more modern LCD.

The look of  a manual mill hasn't changed in ages. They all basically look the same.  Far as the readout, same deal, those all look the same since they came out, not sure when they showed up, probably in the 70s.

In general full machine shops are all CNC so this sort of equipment is basically worthless to them as makes no sense operating cost wise, other than having around for that occasional random task it makes sense.  Older CNCs are getting that way too, problem is you either have to know how to manually G code, or buy software that cost more than the machine you bought, though some open source options are out there now.  Thats where this kind of machine has value to normal folk, you pay for the machine and tools, and use it for life, no software issues. As long as your making basic geometry, you can do a lot with sort of thing pretty easy.
It's funny, a cnc will just slowly obsolete itself and be worth nothing, a good manual mill can keep on making parts. I have a horizontal/vertical rotary table, a tail stock and an indexing head. I can probably make most anything I would need for anything.

A metal planer is on my short list of machines to get.

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Offline DeformedTree

  • Posts: 755
Re: Wells index
« Reply #18 on: March 25, 2020, 11:06 PM »

It looks funny to have that computer control box sticking out the side of that "old time" looking machine.  But it is LED instead of I presume the more modern LCD.

The look of  a manual mill hasn't changed in ages. They all basically look the same.  Far as the readout, same deal, those all look the same since they came out, not sure when they showed up, probably in the 70s.

In general full machine shops are all CNC so this sort of equipment is basically worthless to them as makes no sense operating cost wise, other than having around for that occasional random task it makes sense.  Older CNCs are getting that way too, problem is you either have to know how to manually G code, or buy software that cost more than the machine you bought, though some open source options are out there now.  Thats where this kind of machine has value to normal folk, you pay for the machine and tools, and use it for life, no software issues. As long as your making basic geometry, you can do a lot with sort of thing pretty easy.
It's funny, a cnc will just slowly obsolete itself and be worth nothing, a good manual mill can keep on making parts. I have a horizontal/vertical rotary table, a tail stock and an indexing head. I can probably make most anything I would need for anything.



Sadly that has become the reality to so many things. Adding "smart" to basically everything is just making stuff that goes obsolete in years not decades. This is why there will always be no shortage of people who "rescue" this type of machinery.

Offline Cheese

  • Posts: 7236
Re: Wells index
« Reply #19 on: March 26, 2020, 11:08 AM »
I would actually like to add a Z on my lathe. Only one I deem necessary.

Here's an inexpensive one I added to a small 1960's Atlas metal lathe. The resolution is only .005" but it's still 10X better than nothing.

http://www.wixey.com/fence/index.html

Offline Michael Kellough

  • Posts: 4728
Re: Wells index
« Reply #20 on: March 26, 2020, 01:57 PM »
I put one of those Wixey’s on my table saw a long time ago. At the time I wasn’t using the ts all that often and nearly every time I turned on the Wiley the battery was dead. I gave up on it. Maybe they’ve improved?
« Last Edit: March 26, 2020, 02:09 PM by Michael Kellough »

Offline WarnerConstCo.

  • Posts: 4112
    • Warner Mill Works
Re: Wells index
« Reply #21 on: March 26, 2020, 02:05 PM »
I put one of those Wiley’s on my table saw a long time ago. At the time I wasn’t using the ts all that often and nearly every time I turned on the Wiley the battery was dead. I gave up on it. Maybe they’ve improved?
I am not a huge fan of battery powered scales. Rather have reliable 120v power. Just have to pay the commercial electric bill, instead of buying batteries. Lol

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Offline WarnerConstCo.

  • Posts: 4112
    • Warner Mill Works
Re: Wells index
« Reply #22 on: March 26, 2020, 02:37 PM »
Most everything I needed has arrived. Some new, some cheap, some quality used.

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Offline Cheese

  • Posts: 7236
Re: Wells index
« Reply #23 on: March 26, 2020, 03:12 PM »
I put one of those Wixey’s on my table saw a long time ago. At the time I wasn’t using the ts all that often and nearly every time I turned on the Wiley the battery was dead. I gave up on it. Maybe they’ve improved?

I’ve had great battery life with this one because it uses 2 each AAA batteries. I’ve changed batteries once in 5 years.

The Wixey I’ve had terrible battery life with is the one on my planer because it uses 2 each 2012 coin cells...absolutely horrific, kind of like your table saw, almost every time I use it.  [mad] [mad] [mad]

Offline Cheese

  • Posts: 7236
Re: Wells index
« Reply #24 on: March 26, 2020, 03:23 PM »

Offline Michael Kellough

  • Posts: 4728
Re: Wells index
« Reply #25 on: March 26, 2020, 04:32 PM »
I wrote Wixey and got a reply in less than 5 minutes!

They did upgrade the sliding head to use 2 AAA batteries instead of a dinky watch battery and now the power lasts about 2 years. And the new head fits on the original (and still the same) track/scale.

I’m gonna give it another go.

Offline WarnerConstCo.

  • Posts: 4112
    • Warner Mill Works
Re: Wells index
« Reply #26 on: March 26, 2020, 08:35 PM »
Starting to get this figured out.

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Offline WarnerConstCo.

  • Posts: 4112
    • Warner Mill Works
Re: Wells index
« Reply #27 on: April 05, 2020, 07:22 PM »
Made things, made some scrap as well

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