Author Topic: True Precision Cabinet Jig  (Read 2279 times)

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Offline Birdhunter

  • Posts: 3817
  • Woodworker, Sportsman, Retired
True Precision Cabinet Jig
« on: May 31, 2022, 07:03 AM »
I swallowed hard and ordered the True Precision cabinet hardware jig.

I've installed a lot of drawer pulls and other cabinet hardware just using a plastic guide and a steady eye.

But, I'm building a big dresser out of solid quarter sawn white oak. It has 6 drawers each 30" across and 10" deep. The drawer fronts are made of 12' boards that run left tom right so the grain pattern runs true. If I screw up even one front, the symmetry is ruined as it would be impossible to match the "flow". The client has an excellent eye and would notice the problem.

I'm hoping that the True Precision jig will allow me to place the pulls exactly and perfectly in place. The videos I have watched nd the reviews indicate the jig should work well and it is worth the extremely high price.

I have a young friend who has started doing high end room build outs and he might want to buy this jig from me after I'm done.

Anyone used this jig?
Birdhunter

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Online DynaGlide

  • Posts: 1431
Re: True Precision Cabinet Jig
« Reply #1 on: May 31, 2022, 08:18 AM »
I bought a cheap knock off made with mostly plastic off Amazon when I did my office. Everything came out perfect. Just take your time and double triple check everything and clamp it if you need to.
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Offline Dan C

  • Posts: 64
Re: True Precision Cabinet Jig
« Reply #2 on: May 31, 2022, 08:27 AM »
Depending on the size of the handles you are installing you may end up with an extra guide exposed than you need. I may have done something wrong when I set mine up, but I ended up with an extra hole to repair  [eek] Now I use painters tape if I have ‘extra’ center guide bushing.

It’s a great jig and wouldn’t be without it.

Offline Dan Rush

  • Posts: 608
  • Trim carpenter
Re: True Precision Cabinet Jig
« Reply #3 on: May 31, 2022, 08:51 AM »
I like the True Precision jig. I install hundreds of pulls each year and it's really speeded up the process. It's well made and certainly holds up to heavy use.

The only thing I don't like on their videos is the drilling technique demonstrated; holding the jig and drilling straight thru the front.  I've seen ( and experienced) way too many blowouts on the back side of the door. I use a brad point bit to just start the holes, generally on a whole run of cabinets, then finish them off using a backer board to guarantee no backside blowouts.

Offline Packard

  • Posts: 1357
Re: True Precision Cabinet Jig
« Reply #4 on: May 31, 2022, 09:06 AM »
I've been using Kreg's version.  It seems accurate and repeatable.   I've used it on probably 20 doors/drawers. 

So I cannot comment on the durability.  It is certainly capable of 20 more. 

Just $30.00.   And small enough to fit in the drawer with my other cabinet jigs.  It comes with instructions, but its use is intuitive, so reading them is optional.

https://www.kregtool.com/shop/cabinet-solutions/cabinet-drawer-shelf-jigs/cabinet-hardware-jig/KHI-PULL.html
« Last Edit: May 31, 2022, 09:16 AM by Packard »

Offline Rick Herrick

  • Posts: 734
Re: True Precision Cabinet Jig
« Reply #5 on: May 31, 2022, 09:26 AM »
I have used the Kreg jig solely for a couple of years.  It does do the job just fine but I inquired with a YT'r about the TP jig and he said the biggest reason he uses it is because the hole pattern can span longer distances.  I think the Kreg only goes about 6" on center between holes.  Lots of people now are wanting much farther spacing.  I haven't bought the TP jig yet but I intend to get it once another project requires hole spacing like that.

Offline Redromad

  • Posts: 7
    • Panhandle Woodworks
Re: True Precision Cabinet Jig
« Reply #6 on: May 31, 2022, 10:47 AM »
I used the kREG jig version for a long time but upgraded to the TP about a year ago. I love it. It makes things so much faster and easier. Just make sure the screws on the jig are all tight.

RR

Offline Michael Kellough

  • Posts: 5515
Re: True Precision Cabinet Jig
« Reply #7 on: May 31, 2022, 11:05 AM »
Another option I use on larger installations is a laser.
Sometimes the orientation of hardware is more visible than the gaps between drawers.
Working with the laser allows you do overlay a uniform pattern even when drawer heights vary.

Offline Packard

  • Posts: 1357
Re: True Precision Cabinet Jig
« Reply #8 on: May 31, 2022, 11:09 AM »
Interesting (to me, at least) was a recent HGTV show where the kitchen cabinets were done in satin black and the door hardward was also. 

Visually the hardware nearly disappeared.  Then placement becomes less critical.   [big grin]

For reasons that escape me, my brother's kitchen was done with no handles at all.  But with fingerprints added later.

In my house, I have one cabinet (pantry) where apparently I close the door without using the handle. The location where I do make contact requires cleaning occasionally.  Blame ergonomics.  The handle is in a spot that "looks" appropriate, but which is not ergonomic.  I am refacing the kitchen in the fall and I am not certain where I will put the handle.   
« Last Edit: May 31, 2022, 11:12 AM by Packard »

Offline Peter Kelly

  • Posts: 125
Re: True Precision Cabinet Jig
« Reply #9 on: May 31, 2022, 01:09 PM »
I like the True Precision jig. I install hundreds of pulls each year and it's really speeded up the process. It's well made and certainly holds up to heavy use.

The only thing I don't like on their videos is the drilling technique demonstrated; holding the jig and drilling straight thru the front.  I've seen ( and experienced) way too many blowouts on the back side of the door. I use a brad point bit to just start the holes, generally on a whole run of cabinets, then finish them off using a backer board to guarantee no backside blowouts.
No backer needed if you use a tapered point drill bit to finish the hole through the drawer or door.

Offline Packard

  • Posts: 1357
Re: True Precision Cabinet Jig
« Reply #10 on: May 31, 2022, 01:27 PM »
I have one taper point drill bit but it does not work very well with the bushings that I have.  Perhaps they work better if you have really long bushings.  But with the 1/2" long bushings that come with most jigs, it does not center and it does not maintain perpendicularity. 

If just the last 1/4" were tapered...maybe.

Offline Birdhunter

  • Posts: 3817
  • Woodworker, Sportsman, Retired
Re: True Precision Cabinet Jig
« Reply #11 on: May 31, 2022, 01:38 PM »
I was thinking about using a center punch with the TP jig to locate the hole positions and then drilling with the backer board as suggested above. A misplaced pinprick is easy to overlook rather than a misplaced hole. I have a really big set of center punches so I should find one that is a perfect fit. Clamping the jig sounds like a wise move.
Birdhunter

Offline Packard

  • Posts: 1357
Re: True Precision Cabinet Jig
« Reply #12 on: May 31, 2022, 02:12 PM »
That's an ideal job for a center-finding punch set.  I bought mine from Amazon.com for about $20.00 a few years back.  I use it about 2 or 3 times a year.  Overall, I am glad I bought it. 

Harbor Freight has it for less.  If you are using it on wood or aluminum, there is no reason to get a high quality set made from the best steels and heat-treated to the best temper.  Any old steel will be fine.  Harbor Freight's version is $12.00.  Get it.  You will use it 2 or 3 times a year and you will think it was a good investment.

https://www.harborfreight.com/28-piece-transfer-punch-set-3577.html?utm_source=google&utm_medium=cpc&utm_campaign=16562497321&campaignid=16562497321&utm_content=135022066032&adsetid=135022066032&product=3577&store=390&gclid=EAIaIQobChMI3ZaiqaqK-AIVZvvjBx0S_Q14EAQYASABEgK2jvD_BwE



Offline rvieceli

  • Posts: 1729
Re: True Precision Cabinet Jig
« Reply #13 on: May 31, 2022, 03:51 PM »
That Harbor Freight transfer punch set is more than adequate and of decent quality.

Transfer punches, no matter what the price and quality are not really designed to be pounded into a piece of hard metal. They are generally used to make a mark that is then followed up with a hardened center punch.

They do work extremely well in wood without danger of the punches being damaged.

Ron

Offline Cheese

  • Posts: 9787
Re: True Precision Cabinet Jig
« Reply #14 on: May 31, 2022, 04:23 PM »
If it involves more than a couple of doors/drawers then I just make a jig. This one was used to fit 21 doors for handles for kitchen cabinetry.

3/4" fir stock using threaded & hardened drill bushings that probably cost $2 each back in 1998.  [smile]  This fixture is reversible so I drill all the LH doors, remove and reinsert the bushings on the other side of the jig and then drill all the RH doors. This jig can be used for 96 mm and 164 mm center-to-center length pulls.

Having said that, if this was my livelihood, I'd just purchase the True Precision Jig.





« Last Edit: June 01, 2022, 10:15 AM by Cheese »

Offline Packard

  • Posts: 1357
Re: True Precision Cabinet Jig
« Reply #15 on: May 31, 2022, 04:29 PM »
That Harbor Freight transfer punch set is more than adequate and of decent quality.

Transfer punches, no matter what the price and quality are not really designed to be pounded into a piece of hard metal. They are generally used to make a mark that is then followed up with a hardened center punch.

They do work extremely well in wood without danger of the punches being damaged.

Ron

I would add that my set is “imperial”.  The only time I’ve needed it for metric sizes was for an 8mm hole and 5/16” worked fine.  I also needed to locate a hole for a 4mm threaded hole.  I don’t know what size punch I used, but I found a snug fitting one. 

The imperial unit will probably get you very close to the center of any metric hole.  Certainly close enough for wood working. Machinists would probably get both sets if they worked in both systems.

It is the right tool for a very specific situation and I am glad I have it when that type of situation arises.

Offline Dan Rush

  • Posts: 608
  • Trim carpenter
Re: True Precision Cabinet Jig
« Reply #16 on: May 31, 2022, 04:35 PM »
I like the True Precision jig. I install hundreds of pulls each year and it's really speeded up the process. It's well made and certainly holds up to heavy use.

The only thing I don't like on their videos is the drilling technique demonstrated; holding the jig and drilling straight thru the front.  I've seen ( and experienced) way too many blowouts on the back side of the door. I use a brad point bit to just start the holes, generally on a whole run of cabinets, then finish them off using a backer board to guarantee no backside blowouts.
No backer needed if you use a tapered point drill bit to finish the hole through the drawer or door.
As Packard pointed out,  the tapered bit will most likely wander around in the bushing before ever entering the surface of the door. I'm sure they're great in a drill press or when using a hand drill and super precision isn't required. 

I use great bits,  and always break out a new one to drill for hardware,  but I don't trust any bit to consistently exit some (or any )materials as cleanly as it goes in. As an example,  just last week I installed a cabinet job with high gloss laminate over particleboard.  No way I would ever chance that without a backerboard.

Offline Peter Kelly

  • Posts: 125
Re: True Precision Cabinet Jig
« Reply #17 on: May 31, 2022, 04:52 PM »
I mark the hole locations using a jig from Häfele and a pin punch that corresponds to the bushing size as described above. With a tapered drill I can land the tip exactly on the mark as it's much easier to see than a straight bit. If it's a hard surface like laminate, I'll just start the hole with a brad point bit then finish with the tapered one in a second drill. Never blown out a back.

Offline Birdhunter

  • Posts: 3817
  • Woodworker, Sportsman, Retired
Re: True Precision Cabinet Jig
« Reply #18 on: May 31, 2022, 05:31 PM »
The issue with some of the budget centering punches is that the point isn’t really centered. I use my set a lot more often than I ever expected. I like building small boxes and the centering punches are great for locating holes for the hinges.
Birdhunter

Offline Packard

  • Posts: 1357
Re: True Precision Cabinet Jig
« Reply #19 on: May 31, 2022, 06:05 PM »
The issue with some of the budget centering punches is that the point isn’t really centered. I use my set a lot more often than I ever expected. I like building small boxes and the centering punches are great for locating holes for the hinges.

Unless you find someone making die cast punches, the process that would allow you to produce off-center transfer punches on the lathe escapes me. (Chinese manufacturers are capable of surprising gaffes, so maybe.)

Offline neilc

  • Posts: 3077
Re: True Precision Cabinet Jig
« Reply #20 on: May 31, 2022, 06:10 PM »
I have the TP set and like it a lot.  Have used it for several years across many projects and it works great.

Just  be sure you measure twice!  And I put painters tape over the holes I do not need - center or spread depending on the hardware.  I did make a mistake early on with the jig.  Got in a hurry and plunged in the center hole instead of the spread holes

I do use a backer board for clean holes.  The TP set came with a brad point Festool bit, but even it can blow out the inside of a hole.  I clamp with one of the long-reach Armor clamps - https://armor-tool.com/product/10-c-clamp-pads/

BTW, they also offer 32mm drill guides which also work with the set.  I have them as well and are great for drilling holes on already assembled cabinets.

Offline Crazyraceguy

  • Posts: 1578
Re: True Precision Cabinet Jig
« Reply #21 on: May 31, 2022, 07:55 PM »
The thing about "adjustable" things is that they can get out-of-adjustment without you noticing.
Something like this would be ok if you needed to change a lot, but in a production shop....no way.
We have "sets" of shop made jigs. (one for base and upper doors, one for drawer fronts, one for tall doors) These are for the most common sizes 96mm, 4", 128mm, 192mm. I use the metal inserts from Lee Valley, like the ones cheese pictured above. I drill most of the way through, all down the line, then come back and drill the rest of the way with a backing board.

Taping over extra holes is a good technique to get in the habit of doing. This is especially important with shelf pin jigs. It is very easy to drill them wrong too.
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Offline Birdhunter

  • Posts: 3817
  • Woodworker, Sportsman, Retired
Re: True Precision Cabinet Jig
« Reply #22 on: May 31, 2022, 08:01 PM »
After screwing up, I tape over the holes on my Kreg pocket hole jig that I don’t want to use.

I’d guess that blue painter’s tape is my most used tool. My projects, especially large ones, are covered with blue tape.
Birdhunter

Offline ChuckS

  • Posts: 3594
Re: True Precision Cabinet Jig
« Reply #23 on: May 31, 2022, 08:11 PM »
I buy blue tape in packs. Blue tape and this (I have 4 in various sizes) go hand in hand in my shop:


 
« Last Edit: May 31, 2022, 08:15 PM by ChuckS »

Offline rst

  • Posts: 2797
Re: True Precision Cabinet Jig
« Reply #24 on: May 31, 2022, 08:21 PM »
The Tadpole tape cutters are great, I've bought at least four sets as the individual ones are almost as expensive.  I also use a gaffers tape belt hook that means I don't have to lay down and pickup repeatly

Offline Birdhunter

  • Posts: 3817
  • Woodworker, Sportsman, Retired
Re: True Precision Cabinet Jig
« Reply #25 on: May 31, 2022, 09:13 PM »
What is gaffers tape?
Birdhunter

Offline rvieceli

  • Posts: 1729
Re: True Precision Cabinet Jig
« Reply #26 on: May 31, 2022, 09:30 PM »
@Birdhunter in tv and film a gaffer is the the head electrician or lighting person. Gaffer tape is used to fix, secure and jury rig lighting and cords and just about anything on the set.

It is similar to duct tape but it is usually easier to remove and leaves less glue residue. It is a cloth based carrier but not as water resistant as duct tape. Tears easier across the width as well as the length.

Ron

Offline Michael Kellough

  • Posts: 5515
Re: True Precision Cabinet Jig
« Reply #27 on: May 31, 2022, 09:36 PM »


It’s heavy duty too. A 50 yard rolls weight about 2 pounds.
This is just a 25 yard roll.

Offline Birdhunter

  • Posts: 3817
  • Woodworker, Sportsman, Retired
Re: True Precision Cabinet Jig
« Reply #28 on: June 01, 2022, 01:44 PM »
Thanks for the gaffer info. Does Home Depot carry it?
Birdhunter

Offline Birdhunter

  • Posts: 3817
  • Woodworker, Sportsman, Retired
Re: True Precision Cabinet Jig First Impression
« Reply #29 on: June 03, 2022, 05:37 PM »
I received the True Position jig. I am impressed. It is beautifully made and engineered. I did a test using a poplar board the same size as my drawer fronts. Perfect hole placement the first time. The case is solidly made. The jig is expensive but still a very good value.
Birdhunter