Author Topic: Router Fence Recommendation  (Read 3901 times)

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Offline rst

  • Posts: 2446
Re: Router Fence Recommendation
« Reply #30 on: September 03, 2020, 04:14 PM »
I've been using a self made router table for 20+ years/ mine is large as I often am routing large pieces (I fab plastics regularly). my table is 30 X 49 1 1/8" melamine and a welded steel frame.  I have an original Benchdogs lift which was rare when I bought,  as it was targeted for smaller commercial shops that needed multiple stations.  I have an Incra 17" adjuster with an Incra Wonder fence attached, that coupled with a Dust Router under table dust collector and a Festool router table split hose lets me collect 90% of all duts and chips generated.  The only thing I would ever change is a cast iron table so I could use the Magswitch magnets to attach my guides.

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Offline Bigbob7777

  • Posts: 2
Re: Router Fence Recommendation
« Reply #31 on: September 06, 2020, 12:16 AM »
I am in the process of building a new router table and fence (it's going onto a Hammer K3 slider). Having done a ton of research (along with 25 years using these things), the fence I consider to be the best is the Jessem.

https://www.fine-tools.com/routerfence.html

I will build my own version of this fence. It is pretty straight forward, and I can do it for a fraction of the cost. The Jessem is a great fence to model one on. It's a good fence to buy if you can afford it.

This is where it will go ...



Regards from Perth

Derek
Derek,
I too have the k3.  How did you fit a router table to the k3?
Bob

Offline derekcohen

  • Posts: 482
    • In The Woodshop
Re: Router Fence Recommendation
« Reply #32 on: September 06, 2020, 01:20 AM »
Bob, I only have pics of the previous table, but the method was the same.

Here is the old table ...



My K3 came with a half-panel ...





The top ...



... is secured at one side by bolts into inserts (there are convenient holes in the saw case) ...



Facing the saw, add bolts as legs ...



And the far side I used existing bolt holes to support an aluminium section ...









Current:



More later, if you or others are interested.

Regards from Perth

Derek


Visit www.inthewoodshop.com for tutorials on joinery, hand tools, and my trials and tribulations with furniture builds.

Offline Bigbob7777

  • Posts: 2
Re: Router Fence Recommendation
« Reply #33 on: September 06, 2020, 09:37 AM »
Thx Derek

Offline JimD

  • Posts: 474
Re: Router Fence Recommendation
« Reply #34 on: September 06, 2020, 08:09 PM »
I built my first router table when I was in my 20s but I am now retired.  God has blessed and I can afford some nicer tools now but I still like my last home made router table.  I made it probably about 10 years ago when I was in my 50s. 

One of the reasons I think making your router table is something most woodworkers should do is this sort of shop furniture is a good way to start making things.  You can use whatever type joints you want and it should still work.  I think I dovetailed the drawer on mine but a lot of the joints are just plugged butt joints glued and screwed together.  I have enough drawers to store all my router bits.  The top tilts up for bit changes, a feature I have not seen on any commercial router table.  Height adjustments are by screw, one turn is 1/16th of an inch.  Dust collection from both the cabinet and the fence.  Total locking casters so I can move it and then lock it down.  Height same as table saw and outfeed/accessory table and miter saw table. 

Offline derekcohen

  • Posts: 482
    • In The Woodshop
Re: Router Fence Recommendation
« Reply #35 on: September 07, 2020, 12:51 PM »
Here's the router table and router table fence I have been building. There is a little more work to do on the micro-adjuster, which is coming from AliExpress, as well as the dust extractor for the (2 1/4 hp) Elu 177e router I use. But for now, the rest is done.

This is a very full-on set up. What is relevant is that it did not cost much (don't include the cost of the JessEm guides, which are excellent but a little luxury). It is difficult to total, as some parts, such as the aluminium insert plate, was purchased about 3 years ago, as was the Router Raizer lift, and the MuscleChuck router bit change.

The base for the router table was a laminated high pressure MDF kitchen bench off cut from a kitchen maker ...



This was build into the outfeed of my Hammer K3 sliding table saw ...





These aluminium plates are excellent. After 3 years of hanging the heavy Elu, there is no signs of any dips. The surface remains flat, flat.

The Elu below, minus handles, with Router Raizer attached ...



Above the plate, the MuscleChuck allows for changing bits and easy bit-holding. I built a handle for the Router Raizer from a cut-down socket wrench. This enable fast spinning as well as fine adjustments with the fence close by.



The heart of the fence is made for 8020 extruded aluminium (80mm high and 20mm wide). I comes in 1m lengths, and this fence is 600mm long.



Note that the slots of this extrusion use different T-bits ...



The only other part I bought in were the sub-fences, since these are phenolic-coated, and the dust port.



The subfences. Also note that the dust collection port in the mainfence was made with a 2 1/4" hole saw ...



The Jessem guides, and the bit guard I made ...





Made in two sections and superglued together ...



The rear of the fence, with the dust port, and sub-fence adjusters ...



The reason for bolting on the dust port was not simply to make it possible to remove, but this enabled the T-track to be plugged ...



The (very stiff) UHMW fence bracket is temporary ...



and will be replaced by these brackets with fine-adjuster (only needed on one side) ...



There is adjustment built into the brackets to ensure that the working side of the fence is square to the table ...



I hope that this provides some ideas for your build.

Regards from Perth

Derek
Visit www.inthewoodshop.com for tutorials on joinery, hand tools, and my trials and tribulations with furniture builds.