Author Topic: My Solid Wood Tool Kit and Workflow  (Read 9486 times)

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Offline Svar

  • Posts: 1950
Re: My Solid Wood Tool Kit and Workflow
« Reply #30 on: July 31, 2016, 02:12 PM »
There is a video of a TSC ripping 300'. Try that with any table saw, good luck supporting it and finding 600+ feet of clear space to run the board.

That might actually be easier than finding 300' of rails connecting and aligning it, placing 300’ of sticks to support the rails for a narrow rip, securing your stock and finding and leveling tables to rest this contraption on.

But seriously, I find this “what’s better track or table saw” argument utterly absurd. Both excel at different things. Lets leave it at that.

30 seconds of thought will normally overcome any rip limitation one has in their head.
Tom
Same principle equally applies to a table saw. No?
« Last Edit: July 31, 2016, 02:35 PM by Svar »

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Offline Holmz

  • Posts: 4010
Re: My Solid Wood Tool Kit and Workflow
« Reply #31 on: July 31, 2016, 04:25 PM »
If you already have the TS55 and the jigsaw then try to make both of them work.
I could do this using the jig saw and a thicknesser.
Or a track saw with or without a plane.
If you cannot do it with the existing tools then the table saw will not likely overcome that.

Offline rizzoa13

  • Posts: 587
Re: My Solid Wood Tool Kit and Workflow
« Reply #32 on: July 31, 2016, 06:06 PM »
Track saw vrs table saw: This is what I do so its right.

Offline ear3

  • Posts: 3890
Re: My Solid Wood Tool Kit and Workflow
« Reply #33 on: July 31, 2016, 08:25 PM »
With two saw horses, a sacrificial sheet of ply, and a long rail, you can do a lot of stuff the table saw can do.  Though I like the suggestion made by some about a jobsite saw as well.  Table saws can be lethal if mistreated, but under normal conditions and with proper safety accessories (like fence rollers, feather boards, or some other anti-kickback device), you can eliminate most of the danger.

One work around I've done when ripping narrow material while on site without access to a table saw is to cut it long, then shoot some nails from a cordless nailer into either end to secure it to the table (usually a sheet of ply).  After it's ripped I can just chop off the ends.

Kapex KS 120 w/UG Cart and Extensions • CXS Set • T18+3 w/Centrotec Installer's Set • PDC 18/4 • TS 75 • TSC 55 • HKC 55 w/250, 420 and 670 FSK rails • Carvex 420 w/Accessory Kit • Domino 500 Set • Domino 700 XL • OF 2200 w/Base Accessory Kit • OF 1400 • OF 1010 • MFK 700 EQ Set • LR 32 • MFS 400 w/2000, 1000, and 700 extensions • Rotex 90 • Rotex 150 • LS 130 • ETS-EC 150/5 • ETS-EC 150/3 • Pro 5 LTD • RTS 400 • RAS 115.04 • RS 2 • HL 850 • Vecturo OS 400 • AGC 18-115 • CT 26 w/BT module • CT Sys w/Long-Life Bag • MFT/3

Offline ear3

  • Posts: 3890
Re: My Solid Wood Tool Kit and Workflow
« Reply #34 on: August 01, 2016, 10:55 AM »
Just got the new issue of Fine Woodworking in the mail today @Patrick Cox and there's a good article on how to joint wide boards using a benchtop planer.  With a lunchbox planer, a tracksaw and a jack plane (to deal with twisted boards), you're in pretty good shape to handle the majority of stock preparation situations that might otherwise call for a jointer.
Kapex KS 120 w/UG Cart and Extensions • CXS Set • T18+3 w/Centrotec Installer's Set • PDC 18/4 • TS 75 • TSC 55 • HKC 55 w/250, 420 and 670 FSK rails • Carvex 420 w/Accessory Kit • Domino 500 Set • Domino 700 XL • OF 2200 w/Base Accessory Kit • OF 1400 • OF 1010 • MFK 700 EQ Set • LR 32 • MFS 400 w/2000, 1000, and 700 extensions • Rotex 90 • Rotex 150 • LS 130 • ETS-EC 150/5 • ETS-EC 150/3 • Pro 5 LTD • RTS 400 • RAS 115.04 • RS 2 • HL 850 • Vecturo OS 400 • AGC 18-115 • CT 26 w/BT module • CT Sys w/Long-Life Bag • MFT/3

Offline Patrick Cox

  • Posts: 173
Re: My Solid Wood Tool Kit and Workflow
« Reply #35 on: August 01, 2016, 01:51 PM »
Just got the new issue of Fine Woodworking in the mail today @Patrick Cox and there's a good article on how to joint wide boards using a benchtop planer.  With a lunchbox planer, a tracksaw and a jack plane (to deal with twisted boards), you're in pretty good shape to handle the majority of stock preparation situations that might otherwise call for a jointer.

Thanks Ed.  I'll check that out.

Offline JimD

  • Posts: 413
Re: My Solid Wood Tool Kit and Workflow
« Reply #36 on: August 01, 2016, 09:05 PM »
My table saw is a Ryobi BT3100.  It is more capable in some ways than a jobsite saw but is a lot closer to their size and capabilities than a big cast iron cabinet saw.  I used to have a wide table kit for it that gave me 60 inch rip capacity and I built a lot of furniture for myself and my kids on it.  But then I got a track saw and took the extension rails off.  I like the track saw and little table saw a lot better than either alone.  The track saw is better and big pieces of wood, solid or laminated.  The table saw is better at small pieces.  I do not see it as any more complicated than that.  I can do little pieces on the track saw and can and have done big pieces on the table saw but it's better to not fight things and work within the tools comfort zone. 

My Ryobi isn't sold any more so unless you find a use one, I would look at the DeWalt and Bosch job site saws.  If you have the budget, the Bosch is available with flesh sensing technology as is the SawStop.  One of these little saws to go with your tracksaw will put you in good shape to build furniture.  My other frequently used cutting tools are a 12 inch CMS and RAS on their own bench.  With more limited space, a sliding miter (Kapek is great but expensive) could largely take the place of both.  A lower priced option would be a Bosch glide, or Hitachi or I've seen a good review of the Rigid 12 inch slider.  The Rigid was tested to have decent dust collection.  You can use the table saw for small crosscuts and the tracksaw for large ones, however.  I would view the CMS or RAS as much less important than the table saw or track saw. 

Offline Svar

  • Posts: 1950
Re: My Solid Wood Tool Kit and Workflow
« Reply #37 on: August 01, 2016, 11:04 PM »
I like the track saw and little table saw a lot better than either alone.  The track saw is better and big pieces of wood, solid or laminated.  The table saw is better at small pieces.  I do not see it as any more complicated than that.
Well said. Agree 100%.

Offline Brent Taylor

  • Posts: 471
Re: My Solid Wood Tool Kit and Workflow
« Reply #38 on: August 18, 2016, 07:50 AM »
Pat, to be quite honest the best and safest tool you can acquire is knowledge.  Find someone or a school that can teach you how to work safely and use tools safety.  Any tool  can hurt you,  if you don't have the knowledge of how to use it properly.  I hate seeing all the different post from people that think that any form of manual labor is simply and easy,  between Bob Vila showing that you can build a house in a half hour to the mechanics on the Spike telling you that you only need a wrench and a screwdriver to install an engine. 
Knowledge is the best and safest tool you can acquire.  End of rant. B