Author Topic: Horizontal mill  (Read 1014 times)

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Offline WarnerConstCo.

  • Posts: 4137
    • Warner Mill Works
Horizontal mill
« on: July 30, 2020, 12:40 AM »
Finally getting my new machining area set up and one of the machines was this.  Cleveland 2U, made in Spain (sold in Europe as Ajax) 1970, 9hp spindle, cat 50 tooling, power feeds, rapids, 3 arbors, couple 50 tool holders, universal head.
Table also rotates 45 degrees in either direction on the saddle.

Smaller as far as HM go, about 6000 pounds.



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Offline StanB

  • Posts: 510
  • I like building stuff with my hands.
Re: Horizontal mill
« Reply #1 on: July 31, 2020, 12:08 AM »
What do you plan on making with it?
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Offline WarnerConstCo.

  • Posts: 4137
    • Warner Mill Works
Re: Horizontal mill
« Reply #2 on: July 31, 2020, 03:17 PM »
What do you plan on making with it?
I have a few things I need to make that need slits cut in them. Plan on using for keyways and anything where I need to hog material. I will probably use this more than my vertical mill, once I get use to thinking in a different plane.

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Offline Birdhunter

  • Posts: 3093
  • Woodworker, Sportsman, Retired
Re: Horizontal mill
« Reply #3 on: July 31, 2020, 09:09 PM »
I only do woodworking but I love to watch Abom79 and. Kieth Rucker do metal working. these complex machine tools are awesome. How did you learn to use them?
Birdhunter

Offline WarnerConstCo.

  • Posts: 4137
    • Warner Mill Works
Re: Horizontal mill
« Reply #4 on: July 31, 2020, 09:13 PM »
I only do woodworking but I love to watch Abom79 and. Kieth Rucker do metal working. these complex machine tools are awesome. How did you learn to use them?
I just taught myself. I do have a friend who I can ask questions about stuff. Although I find  a lot of his answers to be too complex. Lol.

I am not that great, but I am able to make/repair parts and they work like they should, which is all that really matters to me.

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Offline Cheese

  • Posts: 7511
Re: Horizontal mill
« Reply #5 on: July 31, 2020, 09:47 PM »
 Hobbing gears in your spare time are you...?   [poke]

Never really needed to use a horizontal mill...then again, if maintenance of old existing industrial equipment is a priority, then it makes sense. There are somethings a knee mill will never be able to do.

Offline WarnerConstCo.

  • Posts: 4137
    • Warner Mill Works
Re: Horizontal mill
« Reply #6 on: July 31, 2020, 10:12 PM »
Hobbing gears in your spare time are you...?   [poke]

Never really needed to use a horizontal mill...then again, if maintenance of old existing industrial equipment is a priority, then it makes sense. There are somethings a knee mill will never be able to do.
I could cut gears, I have a vertical rotary table  and a dividing head, but I would rather just buy a gear hobber. Trust me, I could use one right now to fix a borg Warner 3 speed in a hyster forklift.


One thing I want to explore is refinishing feed chains.

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Offline Cheese

  • Posts: 7511
Re: Horizontal mill
« Reply #7 on: July 31, 2020, 11:08 PM »
I could cut gears, I have a vertical rotary table and a dividing head, but I would rather just buy a gear hobber. Trust me, I could use one right now to fix a borg Warner 3 speed in a hyster forklift.

One thing I want to explore is refinishing feed chains.

That's funny, a Borg Warner manual 3-speed in a Hyster? I thought they were all hydrostatic drive.

This conversation brings me back about 40 years...rebuilding BW & Muncie 4-speed transmissions on a work bench. The work bench still stinks from the tranny fluid.  [smile]

Not familiar with the expression feed chains?

Offline WarnerConstCo.

  • Posts: 4137
    • Warner Mill Works
Re: Horizontal mill
« Reply #8 on: July 31, 2020, 11:15 PM »
I could cut gears, I have a vertical rotary table and a dividing head, but I would rather just buy a gear hobber. Trust me, I could use one right now to fix a borg Warner 3 speed in a hyster forklift.

One thing I want to explore is refinishing feed chains.

That's funny, a Borg Warner manual 3-speed in a Hyster? I thought they were all hydrostatic drive.

This conversation brings me back about 40 years...rebuilding BW & Muncie 4-speed transmissions on a work bench. The work bench still stinks from the tranny fluid.  [smile]

Not familiar with the expression feed chains?
It's a mid 70s 15k pound rigger special.

Someone didn't know what the pedal on the left was for.

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Offline Cheese

  • Posts: 7511
Re: Horizontal mill
« Reply #9 on: July 31, 2020, 11:20 PM »

Someone didn't know what the pedal on the left was for.


LOL...that's funny, times have indeed changed.

So what's this refinishing feed chains entail?
« Last Edit: July 31, 2020, 11:24 PM by Cheese »

Offline WarnerConstCo.

  • Posts: 4137
    • Warner Mill Works
Re: Horizontal mill
« Reply #10 on: July 31, 2020, 11:32 PM »

Someone didn't know what the pedal on the left was for.


LOL...that's funny, times have indeed changed.

So what's this refinishing feed chains entail?
Cutting deeper V shapes in two directions. Chains in most rip saws have sharp points. They wear. If the races and back of chain is good, one can freshen up that chain one time, maybe two.

About 7k if you have to pay for it.

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Offline Birdhunter

  • Posts: 3093
  • Woodworker, Sportsman, Retired
Re: Horizontal mill
« Reply #11 on: August 01, 2020, 02:29 AM »
Watching Abom79 and Kieth Rucker has been enlightening and has bled over into my wood turning. Watching them has also hit my tools budget hard. Starrett rules, digital slide caliper, dial slide caliper, micrometer, digital micrometer, 1” to 6” depth micrometer, snap gages set..... all USA made Starrett stuff. Also, a set of hole starters, not Starrett though and a few reference blocks.
Birdhunter

Offline Steve1

  • Posts: 56
Re: Horizontal mill
« Reply #12 on: August 01, 2020, 07:24 AM »
Nice big machine.

I have a small vertical mill.   I often find it as my best option for making a cut on a woodworking project.   Sometimes the cutters are not the best geometry for wood, but you have to make due with what you have sometimes.   But at least it gives dead-nuts straight, flat and square cuts.

I have an adjustable boring head that I have used numerous times on wood.    Most recently for quickly making plugs to cover screw heads on a table.   With the boring head, I was able to dial in the diameter of the plug by the thousanths of an inch.

Offline Cheese

  • Posts: 7511
Re: Horizontal mill
« Reply #13 on: August 01, 2020, 10:07 AM »
Watching Abom79 and Kieth Rucker has been enlightening and has bled over into my wood turning. Watching them has also hit my tools budget hard. Starrett rules, digital slide caliper, dial slide caliper, micrometer, digital micrometer, 1” to 6” depth micrometer, snap gages set..... all USA made Starrett stuff. Also, a set of hole starters, not Starrett though and a few reference blocks.

FWIW...I have a ton of Starrett stuff and I'd say 90% (everything other than dial gages/dial indicators) was purchased used. Most of these tools are in absolutely pristine condition with no markings of any sort.

There are a lot of machine shops that are started quickly however there are many that also die quickly. When they were first started they purchased their machine tools, tooling and measuring tools new from a supply house, consequently when they go under, most of the stuff they sell, you can't tell from new. 

Just a few Starrett examples:
20-6 Master Precision 6" Square... $67 vs $286
T230XRL Outside Micrometer 0-1"...$31 vs $194
257C Large Surface Gage...$30 vs $225
254Z-18 Master Vernier Height Gage...$60 vs $2064
S384JZ Steel Parallels Set...$61 vs $419



Offline WarnerConstCo.

  • Posts: 4137
    • Warner Mill Works
Re: Horizontal mill
« Reply #14 on: August 01, 2020, 10:09 AM »
Watching Abom79 and Kieth Rucker has been enlightening and has bled over into my wood turning. Watching them has also hit my tools budget hard. Starrett rules, digital slide caliper, dial slide caliper, micrometer, digital micrometer, 1” to 6” depth micrometer, snap gages set..... all USA made Starrett stuff. Also, a set of hole starters, not Starrett though and a few reference blocks.

FWIW...I have a ton of Starrett stuff and I'd say 90% (everything other than dial gages/dial indicators) was purchased used. Most of these tools are in absolutely pristine condition with no markings of any sort.

There are a lot of machine shops that are started quickly however there are many that also die quickly. When they were first started they purchased their machine tools, tooling and measuring tools new from a supply house, consequently when they go under, most of the stuff they sell, you can't tell from new. 

Just a few Starrett examples:
20-6 Master Precision 6" Square... $67 vs $286
T230XRL Outside Micrometer 0-1"...$31 vs $194
257C Large Surface Gage...$30 vs $225
254Z-18 Master Vernier Height Gage...$60 vs $2064
S384JZ Steel Parallels Set...$61 vs $419
I have quite a bit of precision measuring tools, all bought used for next to nothing.

Only things I have bought new are mitutoyo calipers, noga holders and a few indicators.

My favorite is vintage lufkin stuff made in Saginaw MI

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