Author Topic: Hole saws- which one is the best  (Read 13030 times)

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Offline Jiggy Joiner

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Re: Hole saws- which one is the best
« Reply #30 on: July 02, 2020, 05:23 PM »
Most of my hole saws are Bosch, no complaints.

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Offline six-point socket II

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Re: Hole saws- which one is the best
« Reply #31 on: July 02, 2020, 09:30 PM »
Hey Seth,

The one tooth (small diameter), or three teeth (larger diameters) carbide hole saws can absolutely do clean cuts. It's only crucial that they are up to speed before they make contact with whatever you want to cut. For this I prefer a center/pilot drill bit that protrudes the hole saw quite a bit. (Of course this only applies to/works with through holes)

It's a steep learning curve, once you anticipate/expect the "recoil" correctly - the cuts are perfect.

Another big advantage is that they won't cake as much, especially on MDF (and materials that use MDF as base/backing material), like the Bi-Metal ones. Because chips/shavings are much easier removed.

I also have used carbide hole saws that offer as many teeth as BIM do, they are a little harder to control and demand quite a bit of the drill that is used to power them. The results are not per se cleaner than those achieved with the one/three tooth/teeth carbide hole saws.

I only use BIM on sheet metal. Be aware that Bosch offers "progressor type" carbide hole saws now also, these are, according to my sources, of questionable quality and don't live up to the expected life span/number of holes you'd expect from carbide tools. I have not used them myself, because I also had mixed results with the newer carbide consumables. (This does not affect the mentioned "Endurance for Multi Construction, these are older/ a long standing quality product)

Additionally I do keep one of those multi diameter, sheet metal type hole saws around, that's sometimes useful for light use.

My experience with Bosch lies with what they used to call "Endurance for Multi Construction" over here in Europe, they were absolutely worth buying. I have no idea if that is what they call "Daredevil" in the U.S. . The available quick change adapters are another plus. When buying, ask for the newest version, the older one had trouble locking the pilot drill bit. Also the hole enlargement quick change adapter is worth if look, if you do retro-fits. (You can use a smaller hole saw for piloting with it.)

Another brand I have had great results with is MPS from Germany, but their hole saws are third party buyout products (Manufactured in/ COO: CHN).

Kind regards,
Oliver
Kind regards,
Oliver

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Offline Cheese

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Re: Hole saws- which one is the best
« Reply #32 on: July 02, 2020, 11:49 PM »
Reviving this topic.

If you're exclusively cutting metal, some annular cutters would be a better choice. These are better than a traditional drill because they need to remove less material, in the same way that hole saws only cut the periphery of the hole.

There are small diameter ones for use with a conventional cordless drill and larger ones for use with equipment that will accept Weldon shanks.




Offline SRSemenza

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Re: Hole saws- which one is the best
« Reply #33 on: July 03, 2020, 01:06 AM »
Reviving this topic.

If you're exclusively cutting metal, some annular cutters would be a better choice. These are better than a traditional drill because they need to remove less material, in the same way that hole saws only cut the periphery of the hole.

There are small diameter ones for use with a conventional cordless drill and larger ones for use with equipment that will accept Weldon shanks.




No, almost exclusively wood.

Seth

Offline Tom Gensmer

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Re: Hole saws- which one is the best
« Reply #34 on: July 05, 2020, 11:31 AM »
Reviving this topic. I am looking for a large set. Something on the order of the Milwaukee 28 pc or the Lenox 21 pc.  Cutting mostly solid and sheet goods.

I would prefer carbide ( I have one Lenox high tooth count carbide). But can't find any large sets and building one up of individuals becomes costly. I am not going to be cutting a lot of holes so how well do the Bi-Metal hold up? I have a couple that seem to fine after a few holes each. But how about on metal should it ever come up?

I have never used the one to three tooth saws. I think I will want cleaner cuts.  One thing about them is that @Tom Gensmer  said they bind less. It looks to me that that single or triple large tooth would catch / bind more than a higher tooth count?

Looking for input on the current brands / selections.


Seth

Hi Seth! Much like a band saw blade, the wider kerf of the low-tooth carbide tipped hole saws means the body of the tool is less likely to bind in the cut. That being said, I tend to only have a handful of these, typically a 2-9/16" and a 4-1/4".

Beyond that, I tend to acquire good-quality bi-metal hole saws (usually Milwaukee). Depending on cost I've had them resharpened for less than the cost of new.
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Offline rvieceli

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« Last Edit: July 13, 2020, 01:13 PM by rvieceli »

Offline Cheese

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Re: Hole saws- which one is the best
« Reply #36 on: July 13, 2020, 01:24 PM »
Hey Seth Home Depot has some seemingly good pricing on the Milwaukee hole saw kits TODAY 7/13. It’s the special buy of the day. So today only.

https://www.homedepot.com/s/milwaukee%2520hole%2520saw%2520kit?searchtype=suggest&NCNI-5

https://www.homedepot.com/p/Milwaukee-Hole-Dozer-General-Purpose-Bi-Metal-Hole-Saw-Set-28-Piece-49-22-4185/203113585

https://www.homedepot.com/p/Milwaukee-Hole-Dozer-General-Purpose-Bi-Metal-Hole-Saw-Set-20-Piece-49-22-4170/305966971

Those Hole Dozer blades are a lot easier to remove the wooden plug. That's the one thing I hate about hole saws.  [mad]

Offline SRSemenza

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« Last Edit: August 23, 2020, 12:51 AM by SRSemenza »

Offline Svar

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Re: Hole saws- which one is the best
« Reply #38 on: July 13, 2020, 01:38 PM »
Those Hole Dozer blades are a lot easier to remove the wooden plug. That's the one thing I hate about hole saws.  [mad]
What's different about them? Geometry or access holes?

Offline rst

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Re: Hole saws- which one is the best
« Reply #39 on: July 13, 2020, 01:39 PM »
I've been using that 28 pc set for a couple years now, cut plastic, wood, steel and aluminum.  It's great, still haven't gotten around to putting into systainer however.

Offline rvieceli

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Re: Hole saws- which one is the best
« Reply #40 on: July 13, 2020, 02:38 PM »
you gotta love algorithm based dynamic pricing.    [huh]

the 28 piece set is now $40 dollars cheaper at ZORO. Most of the other sets are about the same BUT the 15 piece set is now $360 dollars HIGHER at ZORO. 449 vs 89 at HD  [eek]

Ron

Offline SRSemenza

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Re: Hole saws- which one is the best
« Reply #41 on: July 13, 2020, 02:54 PM »
you gotta love algorithm based dynamic pricing.    [huh]

the 28 piece set is now $40 dollars cheaper at ZORO. Most of the other sets are about the same BUT the 15 piece set is now $360 dollars HIGHER at ZORO. 449 vs 89 at HD  [eek]

Ron

Yes, $40 not $30.


Seth
« Last Edit: August 23, 2020, 12:50 AM by SRSemenza »

Offline Cheese

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Re: Hole saws- which one is the best
« Reply #42 on: July 13, 2020, 04:04 PM »
What's different about them? Geometry or access holes?

Access holes, the early models had 3 narrow slots that a standard screwdriver wouldn't fit thru.


Offline ear3

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Re: Hole saws- which one is the best
« Reply #43 on: July 16, 2020, 03:13 PM »
Thanks guys for liberating more money from my wallet.

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Offline rst

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Re: Hole saws- which one is the best
« Reply #44 on: July 16, 2020, 03:59 PM »
He who dies with the most toys wins... [wink]

Offline SRSemenza

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Re: Hole saws- which one is the best
« Reply #45 on: August 08, 2020, 12:14 PM »
Sooooooo.....

           I ended up going with Lenox over the Milwaukee. Reviews , videos, my own use of a couple older Lenox and Milwaukee indicated that they were very close.  I wanted to be able to cut fairly precise, clean holes and disks. The Lenox being roughly twice the price of the Milwaukee it was a tough call without first hand knowledge.

          I decided to buy an individual 2 3/4"  saw from each since neither set included that size and try them myself. Anecdotal and non- scientific but it did the job on making my decision and I am glad I did my own testing. I used the PDC and cut several holes in 3/4" veneer plywood and solid poplar. I did not try them in metal. I didn't have any to test on and wood is my primary use.

    Both are quite good. And I don't think either brand would disappoint for general purpose use.

        The Milwaukee grabbed more than the Lenox. It seemed to take more downward force to get it to cut and also much more gentle rocking than the Lenox. I was able to easily cut holes without rocking the Lenox at all.

         The Lenox holes were more precise in size than the Milwaukee (even if I didn't rock the Milwaukee). Lenox holes were generally within 1/64th" of the correct size. Which I later confirmed with several different sizes after choosing to keep the Lenox. The Milwaukee holes were often 1/32" - 1/16" too large. Use in a drill press would probably halve those numbers.

        The Milwaukee ejected saw dust clearing the hole much better, which is a good thing, but in the end didn't seem to actually help the results. And the Milwaukee teeth clogged more.

       I suspect the Milwaukee tooth design would do better if hitting nails. It  appears to be quite sturdy. And may be better suited to construction lumber in general. I don't know I didn't do a comparison on those.

   
   In the end I decided the Lenox would serve me better.  The above makes it seem like it is a clear winner ( for me it is) but the Milwaukee is very good as well. I would not hesitate to buy the Milwaukee, especially at half the price, if my intended purpose was more general purpose and less woodworking. It isn't like the Milwaukee didn't cut well, just not as good in my own testing.


Seth

         


         

         
« Last Edit: August 23, 2020, 12:49 AM by SRSemenza »

Re: Hole saws- which one is the best
« Reply #46 on: August 29, 2020, 11:22 PM »
Did you go for carbide tipped or bi-metal?  I have the big daddy bi-metal set and love them. 

Offline SRSemenza

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Re: Hole saws- which one is the best
« Reply #47 on: August 30, 2020, 12:16 AM »
Did you go for carbide tipped or bi-metal?  I have the big daddy bi-metal set and love them.

The Bi-metal Big Daddy set.  And I have started filling in other sizes too. I have used several so far and I really like them.

Seth

Re: Hole saws- which one is the best
« Reply #48 on: August 30, 2020, 01:49 PM »
Did you go for carbide tipped or bi-metal?  I have the big daddy bi-metal set and love them.

The Bi-metal Big Daddy set.  And I have started filling in other sizes too. I have used several so far and I really like them.

Seth

Curious if you'll do anything fancy for how you'll store them or just loose?  The kit is convenient but once you start filling other sizes like you mention they don't nest the same, so I have others that just sit outside the kit.  I'm not really bought into Systainers other than what the tools come in as I'm hobby/shop based so the most my tools move is to my in-laws acreage to do work there and they come right back.  The cost of outfitting Systainers goes a long way to other tools when I don't need portability so much. But still curious if you're storing everything together in something, systainer or otherwise.

-Zach

Offline Peter_C

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Re: Hole saws- which one is the best
« Reply #49 on: August 30, 2020, 02:14 PM »
Curious if you'll do anything fancy for how you'll store them or just loose?  The kit is convenient but once you start filling other sizes like you mention they don't nest the same, so I have others that just sit outside the kit.  I'm not really bought into Systainers other than what the tools come in as I'm hobby/shop based so the most my tools move is to my in-laws acreage to do work there and they come right back.  The cost of outfitting Systainers goes a long way to other tools when I don't need portability so much. But still curious if you're storing everything together in something, systainer or otherwise.

-Zach
There is a point that a full size tool box is the best storage solution. I can not imagine how many Systainer's it would take to hold hand tools...at least for me. At the least cabinets with drawers to mimic a tool box, but wood drawers just can't handle the same amount of weight as a metal tool box.

Edit: In thinking about it, I have forgotten how many "red" blow molded plastic boxes I have thrown away to pack the contents into a tool box for space efficiency. Often even my construction blow molded tool boxes get tossed in favor of a tool box system IE: Ridgid, or Milwaukee Packout tool boxes, that can hold more than one tool type.
« Last Edit: August 30, 2020, 02:21 PM by Peter_C »

Offline SRSemenza

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Re: Hole saws- which one is the best
« Reply #50 on: August 30, 2020, 04:26 PM »
I will be storing them in a tool chest drawer. For the work I do I won't need the full set to be portable. If I need them on site I will know what the cutting will be ahead of time and take a small range of sizes to take with me.  When I get the drawer together I will post pictures.

Seth

Offline Cheese

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Re: Hole saws- which one is the best
« Reply #51 on: August 31, 2020, 01:27 AM »
I just store them nested into 2 groups. Because of their similarity incrementally in sizing, it works well and saves space.







Offline SRSemenza

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Re: Hole saws- which one is the best
« Reply #52 on: August 31, 2020, 02:52 PM »
Anyone know what arbor I need in order to have enough thread space to screw two hole saws on to the same arbor for enlarging holes? None of the ones in the set I bought will work.

Seth

Offline cubevandude

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Re: Hole saws- which one is the best
« Reply #53 on: September 03, 2020, 05:33 PM »
I've never seen anything that will work that way.  Drill the hole size you want in a scrap pc of wood, then clamp it over the other hole and use it as a guide.

Offline RJNeal

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Re: Hole saws- which one is the best
« Reply #54 on: September 03, 2020, 05:38 PM »
Seth, I remember seeing them for sale. I thought they were call whoops bits or something like that. I didn’t lee valley or Garrett wade have them?
I always wanted one of those darn things.
Have you walked your saw today?

Offline Cheese

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Re: Hole saws- which one is the best
« Reply #55 on: September 03, 2020, 05:46 PM »
Oops arbor sold by Starrett. An arbor with concentric threads. A 1/2-20 and a 5/8-18 thread.

Offline RJNeal

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Re: Hole saws- which one is the best
« Reply #56 on: September 03, 2020, 06:06 PM »
Thanks Cheese man.
Have you walked your saw today?

Offline Peter_C

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Re: Hole saws- which one is the best
« Reply #57 on: September 03, 2020, 06:40 PM »
I've never seen anything that will work that way.  Drill the hole size you want in a scrap pc of wood, then clamp it over the other hole and use it as a guide.
I do it another way. I screw or clamp a piece of wood to the backside, then drill the hole normally. Just need something to keep the guide bit centered.

Offline Cheese

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Re: Hole saws- which one is the best
« Reply #58 on: September 04, 2020, 01:02 AM »
Thanks Cheese man.

https://www.starrett.com/metrology/product-detail/KA19-N

They are pretty slick...in the 15 years or more that I've owned one, I've used it about 6-10 times. As others have noted there are work-arounds, however, for the small amount of space it takes up amongst the hole saws and for the few $$ it costs it's a great option to have.

They appear to be pretty goofy looking but they do make sense because they are so simple. Their only purpose is to replace the 1/4" diameter pilot drill in the arbor with a hole saw that's then used as the pilot to center the oversize hole saw. There are no extreme loads being put on the Oops arbor as it is only being used as a method to center the undersized hole saw and all of the forces that the larger holesaw incurs is still being directed to the original arbor.

For example L to R:
1 3/8" hole saw with a 5/8-18 internal thread for an arbor.
Standard arbor having a 5/8-18 external thread and a 1/4" pilot drill.
Oops arbor having both 1/2-20 and 5/8-18 external threads.
3/4" hole saw with a 1/2-20 internal thread.




The 1/4" pilot drill is removed so that the Oops arbor can be installed in its place. The Oops arbor will accept hole saws that have both 1/2-20 and 5/8-18 internal threads.




The new enlarged hole saw is threaded onto the original arbor while the original sized hole saw is threaded onto the Oops arbor.




The Oops arbor with the pilot hole saw is inserted into the original arbor which holds the larger holesaw and is secured with the original setscrew.




Holesaw arbors with both 1/2-20 and 5/8-18 external threads can be utilized.

« Last Edit: September 04, 2020, 11:36 AM by Cheese »

Offline SRSemenza

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Re: Hole saws- which one is the best
« Reply #59 on: September 04, 2020, 11:36 AM »
Yup, that's it. Oops arbor.     I think I have also seen that some regular arbors have just enough thread length to hold two saws.  But the Starret looks like a much better option.

Thanks,

          Seth