Author Topic: Hole Cutters  (Read 480 times)

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Online Birdhunter

  • Posts: 3140
  • Woodworker, Sportsman, Retired
Hole Cutters
« on: August 14, 2020, 12:59 PM »
I tried using a bi-metal hole cutter to core out a 2” starter hole for bracelets. What a disaster! I’d get 1/2” into the wood and the cutter would stop cutting. Totally gunked up.

I had to go back to using Forstner bits. Had to start with 1” and work up to 2” in steps.

I wonder if a carbide hole cutter would work better.
Birdhunter

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Offline MikeGE

  • Posts: 119
Re: Hole Cutters
« Reply #1 on: August 14, 2020, 01:07 PM »
Try this technique:



Online Cheese

  • Posts: 7675
Re: Hole Cutters
« Reply #2 on: August 14, 2020, 01:28 PM »
Try this technique:

That’s the technique I use but with a 1” wide small paint brush. I think the toothbrush would work better because of the stiffer bristles...I’ll give it a try 🙏 🙏 thanks.

Offline SRSemenza

  • Global Moderator
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  • Posts: 9325
  • Finger Lakes Region, NY State , USA
Re: Hole Cutters
« Reply #3 on: August 14, 2020, 01:45 PM »
     I don't think carbide will help much because it has more to with the saw dust not clearing out.

Seth

Offline jimbo51

  • Posts: 495
Re: Hole Cutters
« Reply #4 on: August 14, 2020, 01:55 PM »
If the core is waste, drill a couple of 1/4 inch through holes that intersect the kerf of the hole saw. The holes will allow the sawdust to fall out and should make the drilling much better.

Offline Sparktrician

  • Posts: 4010
Re: Hole Cutters
« Reply #5 on: August 14, 2020, 02:24 PM »
Try this technique:

That’s the technique I use but with a 1” wide small paint brush. I think the toothbrush would work better because of the stiffer bristles...I’ll give it a try 🙏 🙏 thanks.

When I've gotten a bunch of gunk baked onto hole saws, I've used the orange saw blade cleaner sprayed on and let to sit overnight to clean the hole saw.  I've also had to use a fingernail brush and an ice pick to clean between the teeth.  All that said, I like the idea shown in the video.   [smile]
- Willy -

  "Show us a man who never makes a mistake and we will show a man who never makes anything. 
  The capacity for occasional blundering is inseparable from the capacity to bring things to pass."

 - Herman Lincoln Wayland (1830-1898)

Online Birdhunter

  • Posts: 3140
  • Woodworker, Sportsman, Retired
Re: Hole Cutters
« Reply #6 on: August 14, 2020, 03:00 PM »
Great video
Birdhunter

Offline JimD

  • Posts: 474
Re: Hole Cutters
« Reply #7 on: September 02, 2020, 04:30 PM »
Better technique helps but so does a better hole saw.  I recently got a nice Milwaukee set and it cuts noticably better than the others I have tried.  It cuts deeper too but my old ones cut 1 inch material fine.  I use hole saws on my drill press when possible.  It has a good speed guide on the side that lets me get that right.  Going too fast will cause burning and gunking up too.