Author Topic: Does anyone know if the Rapid Clamp will work simultaneously with the FS-WA..  (Read 946 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline Econoline

  • Posts: 21
Does anyone know if the Rapid Clamp (489790) will work simultaneously with the FS-WA Angle Stop (577040), or the FS-WA (205229)?

Festool USA does not pre-approve the contents of this website nor endorse the application or use of any Festool product in any way other than in the manner described in the Festool Instruction Manual. To reduce the risk of serious injury and/or damage to your Festool product, always read, understand and follow all warnings and instructions in your Festool product's Instruction Manual. Although Festool strives for accuracy in the website material, the website may contain inaccuracies. Festool makes no representations about the accuracy, reliability, completeness or timeliness of the material on this website or about the results to be obtained from using the website. Festool and its affiliates cannot be responsible for improper postings or your reliance on the website's material. Your use of any material contained on this website is entirely at your own risk. The content contained on this site is provided for informational purposes only and does not constitute professional advice.


Offline guybo

  • Posts: 335
hi, i use it for long rips ,you do have to go to the oppsite end and tighten

Offline FestitaMakool

  • Posts: 1302
In short, no.
It relies on the t-track under the guide rail and it will interfere with both angle attachments.

Edit: Didn’t think of using only the handle like Guybo..  [big grin]
Consider the “L” one if used as intended. That handle swings to the left and does not interfere with the cut line, unless you are left handed or use it like Guybo here.
I got the “R” one, and want the “L” one..
« Last Edit: April 28, 2022, 05:45 PM by FestitaMakool »
“The Stig” Yes, it is true, at least some part of it..
“If you have an old Land Rover and a fit wife, you’re most likely always busy”

Offline Econoline

  • Posts: 21
Understood, thanks one and all. Anyone know of a light-weight, light-duty plastic version of a track square?
 I'm not going to cut against it, just for reference.
E

Offline mino

  • Posts: 941
Understood, thanks one and all. Anyone know of a light-weight, light-duty plastic version of a track square?
 I'm not going to cut against it, just for reference.
E
Not exist and cannot exist (an be trully square to be more exact). Plastics warp heavily with temperature so once you go big it is tricky (uneconomical) to have it retain shape.


You best bet is to make one from ply. Would still be light and can be made more stable/accurate than a plastic one for peanuts.

Just use the tried-and-true 3-4-5 method from ancient Egypt to get a (big) square angle on a ply sheet, then cut off as big a square you want.

I did it like this:
 - first chose a "starting point" A - where my square angle will be, put a small nail in it
 - then measured a point B generally along the long edge of the ply 1600 mm from the starting point and marked it (with putting a small nail in it
 - then measured a tentative position C1 for a point C along the shorter edge 1200 mm from the starting point - approximately, just marked it (no nail yet)
 - then measured a tentative position C2 for a point C as a distance of 2000 mm from point B and as close as possible to C1
 - repeat adjusting position of tentative C# until it is precisely 1200 from A and 2000 from B, put nail there now, that is your C point
 - cross-check the distances are indeed 1200/1600/2000 exactly
 - make a cut with a tracksaw along the A-B line (cutting along whole sheet)
 - make a cut with a tracksaw along the A-C line (again cutting along whole sheet)
 - now we got a precise square where point A once was, all we need to do is arbitrarilly cut-off as big a sqaure we want/need

Notes:
Ideally, you would use a huge Compass, but most people would not have one big-enough, so a Class 1 tape measure used per above it was for me.

The precision of the procedure is limited to the ratio of your point-placement imprecision to the distances between points ABC. The bigger the distances, the higher precision. So you want to "create the square" useing whole sheet, even while you will use only small part of the edge for the actual square.
When The Machine has no brains, use Yours.

Offline squall_line

  • Posts: 1386
@mino, I think the 2000 and 1600 lines should say "(5x400mm)" and "(4x400mm)" respectively...

Offline mino

  • Posts: 941
@mino, I think the 2000 and 1600 lines should say "(5x400mm)" and "(4x400mm)" respectively...
Thanks ... started with the long edge at a nice round 2400 when drawing it and then realized one cannot fit 1800 mm across a sheet ... at least the sizes are proper.

When I was doing mine, I actually went with max-available-cross-width that was a multiple of 3 /in mm/ ... every thousand counts. Right?

 [smile]
When The Machine has no brains, use Yours.