Author Topic: Eibenstock EOF 100  (Read 639 times)

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Offline yetihunter

  • Posts: 749
Eibenstock EOF 100
« on: July 11, 2020, 02:05 AM »
Anyone have any experiences trying one of these out on painted wood? CS Unitec provides a 110v model in the US. 

link

cs unitec link

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Offline aloysius

  • Posts: 398
Re: Eibenstock EOF 100
« Reply #1 on: July 12, 2020, 05:31 AM »
It's an unfair comparison:  one's a rotary surface "planer", the other a gear-driven planetary/random orbital sander.

I have a similar-but-different Metabo "paint planer" (LF724) which is extremely fast, effective & micro-adjustable for depth down to all-but removing single layers of a multi-painted surface.  BUT it's only useful & useable on straight, flat surfaces & absolutely hates nailheads etc. that often lie hidden under multiple layers of paint.

A rotary, or even Rotex sander will always be slower, but more flexible & versatile than a straight paint planer will be.  Hitting nailheads will result in the rapid dulling of grit of the paper used rather than catastrophic damage to the (albeit 4-sided) carbide cutters of the paint planer.

The paint planer will also remove paint up to 20mm from any 90 degree adjacent surfaces (it has 3 small opening/locking "doors" around the 3 edges of the machined cutterhead), such as window sills & other rebated timbers.

My paint planer is far faster, but will still require a "touch-up" final sand just as with any planed surface.

FOG-wit since '95:  Some say since birth...

Offline Alex

  • Posts: 6629
Re: Eibenstock EOF 100
« Reply #2 on: July 12, 2020, 05:43 AM »
It's an unfair comparison:  one's a rotary surface "planer", the other a gear-driven planetary/random orbital sander.

They're both the same type of machine, an angle grinder with a milling head on it.

Offline aloysius

  • Posts: 398
Re: Eibenstock EOF 100
« Reply #3 on: July 12, 2020, 12:29 PM »
It's an unfair comparison:  one's a rotary surface "planer", the other a gear-driven planetary/random orbital sander.

They're both the same type of machine, an angle grinder with a milling head on it.


If you'd actually explored the links, Alex, before launching your inappropriate diatribe, you would've noticed the "comparison" video between a Rotex 150 (with a poorly-fitted 6-hole abrasive disc) & the Eibenstock.  A Rotex isn't an angle grinder, despite having superficial similarities.  But you already know that, don't you?  I'm not quite sure why you're pretending it is.

THIS is the "unfair comparison":



The Eibenstock & "Unitec" EOF 100 (which is also an Eibenstock) shown in the links are the same machine: same model designation, same livery, both fitted with a 3 carbide toothed disc but with different voltages, but they're being COMPARED (unfairly I contend) to the Rotex, which is an altogether different machine.  A Rotex would, however be an acceptable follow-up machine for surfaces processed with a paint planer.  A standard Rando & Delta Orbital for the corners would be better still.

They're messy machines.  You need powerful extraction.  As with any planer, they produce prodigious amounts of swarf.  Using a 36mm hose on my Metabo LF724 is advantageous, as will keeping all 3 of those flimsy little plastic doors shut.  If you lose or break one off, dust & chips are propelled outwards irrespective of the vac attached.

There's also something of a "knack" to getting the best results & least collateral damage in the fastest possible time.  Starting off with the cutter protruding slightly less or just level with the paint thickness (measured in 0.5mm increments) is wise.  Even when accurately set more than one pass is usually required unless you set the cutterhead to gouge into the substrate too.  No painted wooden surface remains perfectly flat & planar.  It's wood, so it moves over time & humidity variations.  So you will invariably need a follow-up fine sand anyway.  The vertical cutters can be quite savage as they don't have any depth adjustment.

A gear-driven rotary or planetary sander like the "comparison" Rotex will generally be much slower & will require multiple passes with a variety of descending grit sizes.

THIS video shows a fair & reasonable overview of Metabo's paint planer's abilities & limitations.  Most other Youtube vids show the tool in use without extraction, which is crazy:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5YhE6GqVKrs&t=509s&frags=pl%2Cwn

There's also another product called the "Paint Shaver Pro" which appears to be a basic cutterhead bolted to a variety of grinder bodies:  I've seen them on Hitachi, Makita & Fein grinder bodies.  Their owners seem pretty happy with them.  Both the Eibenstock/Unitec & Metabo seem to be more refined & better resolved products in my opinion.


 
« Last Edit: July 12, 2020, 12:36 PM by aloysius »
FOG-wit since '95:  Some say since birth...

Offline Michael Kellough

  • Posts: 4820
Re: Eibenstock EOF 100
« Reply #4 on: July 12, 2020, 01:29 PM »
I have the Metabo Paint Remover. It’s advantage over the tool above is that it can cut right up to a vertical surface.

I used it to flatten a wood floor whose boards had cupped after getting soaked by the fire department. They stayed cupped for two decades. The wood is some kind of southern pine (harvested about 140 years ago) and it remains so resinous that every abrasive I tried gummed up so fast it wasn’t worth proceeding. The Metabo’s carbide cutters did gum up some but not so bad that they stopped cutting.

As aloysius suggests I set the depth to almost even with the machine’s base. I used it like a file. Pushing forward then lifting slightly and pulling back and then forward again. Pushing forward faster than the tool can chew causes it to climb a bit so each repetition of forward stroke allows it to cut closer to coplaner with the base.

Offline Alex

  • Posts: 6629
Re: Eibenstock EOF 100
« Reply #5 on: July 12, 2020, 02:38 PM »
It's an unfair comparison:  one's a rotary surface "planer", the other a gear-driven planetary/random orbital sander.

They're both the same type of machine, an angle grinder with a milling head on it.


If you'd actually explored the links, Alex, before launching your inappropriate diatribe, you would've noticed the "comparison" video between a Rotex 150 (with a poorly-fitted 6-hole abrasive disc) & the Eibenstock.  A Rotex isn't an angle grinder, despite having superficial similarities.  But you already know that, don't you?  I'm not quite sure why you're pretending it is.


Aloysius, please explain to me how the sentence that I said, "They're both the same type of machine, an angle grinder with a milling head on it." is an inappropriate diatribe?
 
THIS is the "unfair comparison":

The Eibenstock & "Unitec" EOF 100 (which is also an Eibenstock) shown in the links are the same machine: same model designation, same livery, both fitted with a 3 carbide toothed disc but with different voltages, but they're being COMPARED (unfairly I contend) to the Rotex, which is an altogether different machine.

The machines in the two links are different, one is the EOF100, the other the EOF100.1. They are even visually different.

I didn't scroll down to see that video where they compare it to a Rotex. Irrelevant to OP's question, he didn't ask about that. Maybe read his first post again.

Offline yetihunter

  • Posts: 749
Re: Eibenstock EOF 100
« Reply #6 on: July 13, 2020, 12:10 AM »
To summarize, none of you guys have experience with the Eibenstock product.  [wink]

Offline Michael Kellough

  • Posts: 4820
Re: Eibenstock EOF 100
« Reply #7 on: July 13, 2020, 09:57 AM »
Yep.