Author Topic: Drill Press Table  (Read 3607 times)

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Online derekcohen

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Drill Press Table
« on: December 09, 2019, 11:20 AM »
A couple of weeks ago I took advantage of a Black Friday sale and purchased a Nova Voyager drill press for a great discount. This replaced a Taiwanese model I had for 25 years. Yeah, I know this machine is OTT, but it is an amazing tool. For those who are not familiar with the Voyager, it is a computerised, variable speed drill press with a 2 hp direct drive motor (240v). I have already used it to determine the ideal speed for a selection of forstner bits, and then drill to a preset depth, and stop automatically at that depth.

Putting it together was .. uh  ... a little scary. The motor section is extremely heavy, and I was concerned that I would drop it in my usual clumsy fashion. Anyway, it was put together without mishap. A Nova fence was one of the freebees thrown in ...



Nova recommend that one not use a mobile base, however I need to do so since my machines occupy one side of a double garage, and some machines need to be mobile. The drill press is one. The ideal mobile base is as low to the floor as possible. A low centre of gravity is more stable, but also you do not want to raise the drill press up too much as the controls and computer screen may be moved out of your comfort zone.



Steel mobile base on lockable wheels ...



This post is more about the table I built for the drill press. Some may be able to use the ideas here. Most of the ideas are old hat, but there are a couple of novel ideas. My old drill press  used nothing more exciting than a piece of plywood over the cast iron table. Somehow it was sufficient, although the work holding sucked ... and this is what I wanted to address here. Plus, the sacrificial board became chewed up and useless very quickly, and I had an idea to improve on this.

I was not crazy about the cast iron table as a work surface. For a top I found in my local salvage yard a 18" x 25" UHMW slab 30mm (1-1/4") thick. This is about as perfect a table top as one could get - it is very resistant to damage, and yet will not damage wood placed on it.

It planes without any tearout :)



The first task was to dado in aluminium tracks for the fence and hold downs, and then to create a circular mortice for a sacrificial section ...



Using a power router to waste UHMW is an interesting experience - lots of plastic string everywhere, and dust control was not working well. The circular recess was time consuming and finicky. The template began as a 2" forstner cut hole. This was then progressively widened to 4" using a rebate and a flush cut bit in the router table. Finally, the template was used with a pattern cutter to create the circular recess, above.

The circular sacrificial disks are 1/2" thick MDF. I found it quicker to saw them fractionally oversize on the bandsaw, and then turn them on the lathe ...



Here now is the basic table ...



There is a cut out at the rear for the winder ...



Now why did I choose a circular sacrificial section? I have seen many drill press tables using square sections. I cannot recall seeing any with round disks (unless it was dedicated to a sander, but that is not the same thing). The drill bit is not centred on the square. Instead, it is moved to the rear of the square. That way one can rotate the disk four times after it becomes holed. My objection to this design was that one only obtained four points, and as soon as one section became holed, it could no longer back up the drill.

Now a circular disk, on the other hand, has an infinite number of positions (infinite until the circle is completed). Just rotate as much as you need. More work to make, but better in the long run.



Here is the finished table ...



The Nova fence came with those twisty levers. They are useless ... difficult to achieve the ideal tautness and hard to get to behind the fence. I replaced them with the long knobs. These needed to be cut down by 3/4" to avoid fowling the downfeed handles.



The tracks not only hold the fence, but also Incra hold downs ...



... and even the Micro Jig clamps for taller boards ...



I hope there is something you can use.

Regards from Perth

Derek

Festool USA does not pre-approve the contents of this website nor endorse the application or use of any Festool product in any way other than in the manner described in the Festool Instruction Manual. To reduce the risk of serious injury and/or damage to your Festool product, always read, understand and follow all warnings and instructions in your Festool product's Instruction Manual. Although Festool strives for accuracy in the website material, the website may contain inaccuracies. Festool makes no representations about the accuracy, reliability, completeness or timeliness of the material on this website or about the results to be obtained from using the website. Festool and its affiliates cannot be responsible for improper postings or your reliance on the website's material. Your use of any material contained on this website is entirely at your own risk. The content contained on this site is provided for informational purposes only and does not constitute professional advice.


Offline rvieceli

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Re: Drill Press Table
« Reply #1 on: December 09, 2019, 12:22 PM »
very nice

Offline egmiii

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Re: Drill Press Table
« Reply #2 on: December 09, 2019, 01:42 PM »
Nice work. Thanks for sharing.

Offline Jiggy Joiner

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Re: Drill Press Table
« Reply #3 on: December 09, 2019, 04:16 PM »
Nice job, they are a real nice piece of kit.

I made a mobile base for mine, and a melamine table. I replaced the table lift crank handle with a wheel, as I wanted a full width table. Added a Wixey laser and an Albrecht chuck.
Well pleased.

Enjoy yours  [thumbs up]

Online derekcohen

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Re: Drill Press Table
« Reply #4 on: December 09, 2019, 06:32 PM »
Hi JJ

I shall be adding a Wixey laser (ordered), and I have also another laser to install, one with a long, straight line. This is to aid in aligning angles for staked legs. If you need to add a light, a LED book light works well.

Regards from Perth

Derek


Offline Bob D.

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Re: Drill Press Table
« Reply #5 on: December 09, 2019, 10:09 PM »
"a LED book light works well."

An LED sewing machine light works well too, and may be brighter
than a reading light. Many also have magnetic bases. You can find
them for <$15 online.
-----
It's a table saw, do you know where your fingers are?

Online Cheese

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Re: Drill Press Table
« Reply #6 on: December 09, 2019, 11:27 PM »
Nice job on the table Derek. The Wixey laser is really nice. A ton better than the earlier generation manufactured from someone else. That was trash.

Also a fan of Albrecht keyless chucks. The UHMW makes a great table material. It’s tough to kill.

I also did an offset table insert, however it was square which only gave me 4 turns. I really like the circular geometry, it just makes sense.

Aesthetically I love the black/silver contrast.  That alone is enough to dumpster dive for the UHMW.

Offline hdv

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Re: Drill Press Table
« Reply #7 on: December 10, 2019, 05:26 AM »
Hi Derek, Great job with that drill press table! I did the same with my drill press table. Round inserts as sacrificial backers made more sense to me as well. I wanted to add an option for drum sanding, so if had to make inserts for inserts[1]  [blink]. I does work great though.

[1] I posted some photos in this thread that show what I mean with that.


Offline Jiggy Joiner

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Re: Drill Press Table
« Reply #8 on: December 10, 2019, 05:30 AM »
Hi JJ

I shall be adding a Wixey laser (ordered), and I have also another laser to install, one with a long, straight line. This is to aid in aligning angles for staked legs. If you need to add a light, a LED book light works well.

Regards from Perth

Derek

Hi Derek, thanks, I’ll take a look at the LED book lights.

Offline Rich Kline

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Re: Drill Press Table
« Reply #9 on: December 10, 2019, 11:53 AM »
Sorry, what is "UHMW"

Thanks,
Rich

Offline Jiggy Joiner

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Re: Drill Press Table
« Reply #10 on: December 10, 2019, 12:42 PM »
Sorry, what is "UHMW"

Thanks,
Rich

Hi Rich.
Ultra High Molecular Weight polythene/plastic is the sheet material Derek made his table from. [wink]

Offline Rich Kline

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Re: Drill Press Table
« Reply #11 on: December 10, 2019, 12:48 PM »
Thanks!  Is it similar to Phenolic?   I love that he found it at a salvage yard.

Online Cheese

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Re: Drill Press Table
« Reply #12 on: December 10, 2019, 01:27 PM »
Thanks!  Is it similar to Phenolic? 

No, two different animals. Phenolic is comprised of layers of paper and a resin.

UHMW is polyethylene plastic. Very slippery and very durable but not as stiff as phenolic.

Offline 08G8V8

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Re: Drill Press Table
« Reply #13 on: December 12, 2019, 04:33 AM »

I also did an offset table insert, however it was square which only gave me 4 turns. I really like the circular geometry, it just makes sense.




Cheese, I have seen some pics of yours in one of the Voyager drillpress threads, and it looks like a Woodpeckers table. Is that right?  I ordered one being delivered today. If so, did you just offset it by an inch or so to be able to allow the rotation of the filler plate?  I assume the Woodpecker is centered on the filler.


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Online Cheese

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Re: Drill Press Table
« Reply #14 on: December 12, 2019, 10:56 AM »
Cheese, I have seen some pics of yours in one of the Voyager drillpress threads, and it looks like a Woodpeckers table. Is that right?  I ordered one being delivered today. If so, did you just offset it by an inch or so to be able to allow the rotation of the filler plate?  I assume the Woodpecker is centered on the filler.

Yes it is a Woodpecker table, I like it a lot. For me one of the best features is the short fence but with 6-8 stainless stops attached. If doing multiple pieces that have the holes in the same place just set the stops and each piece will be the same. On long pieces I will work left to right, rotate the piece 180º and then work right to left.



I started with the hole in the center of the insert, then offset the square insert by about 1/2" and now I'm thinking about making an adapter so I can use a circular offset insert.

The DP3 fence is also nice to have. This summer I needed to bore holes in 2" PVC pipe. The holes needed to be centered and located at the same distance on all of the pieces. I clamped a stop to the DP3 fence and then clamped each PVC pipe to the fence and bored the holes. Easier, faster and more accurate than placing each item in a vise.


Offline 08G8V8

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Re: Drill Press Table
« Reply #15 on: December 12, 2019, 12:22 PM »
I ordered the number 2 package with the knuckle clamps and 2 plastic flip stops. I already have a couple of the metal flip stops. I almost ordered the DP3 fence, but I ordered extra angle extrusion from 8020 on my order that is coming this coming week. I have some 3x3x.25 angle that I can make a fence from.

I will be offsetting my table when I set it up this weekend.

Thanks


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Offline 08G8V8

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Re: Drill Press Table
« Reply #16 on: December 12, 2019, 12:33 PM »
Cheese, I have seen some pics of yours in one of the Voyager drillpress threads, and it looks like a Woodpeckers table. Is that right?  I ordered one being delivered today. If so, did you just offset it by an inch or so to be able to allow the rotation of the filler plate?  I assume the Woodpecker is centered on the filler.


I started with the hole in the center of the insert, then offset the square insert by about 1/2" and now I'm thinking about making an adapter so I can use a circular offset insert.

I assume you plan on just routing to the minimum diameter to remove the square and make it round at the same depth. That sounds like a good feature, so I will follow your lead down the road, but will just use it offset slightly for now.



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Offline jeffinsgf

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Re: Drill Press Table
« Reply #17 on: December 12, 2019, 12:38 PM »
DISCLAIMER: For anyone who doesn't know, I work for Woodpeckers.

The circular inserts look like a pretty nifty feature, and we've contemplated them a time or two...BUT...

Everyone reading this is equipped to make square replacement inserts in a moments notice. There are far fewer who are equipped to make round inserts, and even if you have the stuff, they take more time and are harder to make fit perfectly.

Every time I have an oddball scrap of ply or MDF, it gets cut up into insert squares instead of going into the trash. I have a stack by my DP. Always have fresh support.

Offline tjskinny

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Re: Drill Press Table
« Reply #18 on: December 12, 2019, 12:45 PM »
Very nice Derek !

I did a similar thing with the Nova fence using a rockler drill table with t-tracks, knobs, and a square sacrificial plate.  But I do like your design much better.

Just curious, how did you mount your table to the existing Nova table?


Offline Scott in Bend

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Re: Drill Press Table
« Reply #19 on: December 12, 2019, 01:28 PM »
Why not use a round insert in the existing square hole?  You could use the four open corners as an insert lifting/rotating access point.

Offline jeffinsgf

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Re: Drill Press Table
« Reply #20 on: December 12, 2019, 02:38 PM »
Why not use a round insert in the existing square hole?  You could use the four open corners as an insert lifting/rotating access point.

Or...an octagon, which would give you 8 fresh points vs. 4, and you could still cut it with straight-line equipment.

Offline Mike Goetzke

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Re: Drill Press Table
« Reply #21 on: December 12, 2019, 03:17 PM »
How often do most change out these inserts?

Offline jeffinsgf

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Re: Drill Press Table
« Reply #22 on: December 12, 2019, 03:49 PM »
How often do most change out these inserts?
Depends on what you're cutting and how critical back side tear out is to you. For furniture and cabinet work, where the back of the cut will be exposed, you want a fully clean surface directly under the hole. For rough work, it probably doesn't matter.

Offline Jiggy Joiner

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Re: Drill Press Table
« Reply #23 on: December 12, 2019, 03:54 PM »
How often do most change out these inserts?

It really depends on usage Mike. My inserts are circular, and quite big, with a fair drill point offset. As I use Forstners and hole saws quite a bit, these can eat the inserts quite quickly but, when drilling up to 10mm they last well. When cutting real large holes, I clamp a sacrificial board to the table.
One afternoon I made up a stack of inserts that should last a while.

Offline Mike Goetzke

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Re: Drill Press Table
« Reply #24 on: December 12, 2019, 04:04 PM »
How often do most change out these inserts?

It really depends on usage Mike. My inserts are circular, and quite big, with a fair drill point offset. As I use Forstners and hole saws quite a bit, these can eat the inserts quite quickly but, when drilling up to 10mm they last well. When cutting real large holes, I clamp a sacrificial board to the table.
One afternoon I made up a stack of inserts that should last a while.

This is why I asked. I built a DP table many years ago from a Wood Magazine design. It has seen it's day and needs replacement. I made several inserts for the table but have only used a couple over probably 20 years! I usually use a backer board like you suggest.

Also, I use my DP about 30-40% of the time for aluminum/steel. Do others use separate DP's for wood/metal work?

Thanks
Mike

Offline Bob D.

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Re: Drill Press Table
« Reply #25 on: December 12, 2019, 04:55 PM »
Why not use a round insert in the existing square hole?  You could use the four open corners as an insert lifting/rotating access point.

Or...an octagon, which would give you 8 fresh points vs. 4, and you could still cut it with straight-line equipment.

And if you flip it over, 8 more.
-----
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Offline dicktill

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Re: Drill Press Table
« Reply #26 on: December 12, 2019, 08:13 PM »
Why not use a round insert in the existing square hole?  You could use the four open corners as an insert lifting/rotating access point.

Or...an octagon, which would give you 8 fresh points vs. 4, and you could still cut it with straight-line equipment.

And if you flip it over, 8 more.

And another thing you can do to get more usage out your insert is to swing (rotate) the table left or right slightly.

Online derekcohen

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Re: Drill Press Table
« Reply #27 on: December 14, 2019, 04:09 AM »
I replaced the Nova chuck (which is actually a cheapish Chinese-made keyed chuck), with a 13mm keyless Albrecht clone I have used for several years. I had good results with this in my previous drill press, and was wondering whether to upgrade it or not. Consequently, I completed some run out tests for it.

Set up ...



I used a 1/4" shank carbide router bit as the test piece. This was a one-time test, so I may have had better results from another router bit, or from re-positioning it. It is what it is ...



Results ...



This reads 0.045mm run out. That is 0.0017" run out. Is that good or bad?

My understanding is: there is run out that may occur with the spindle, then there is run out that will occur at the chuck and quill (which could also be measured separately), and finally there is the run out measured at the bit. The results here are a total of all these together. It was mentioned to me that around 5 thousands of an inch would be acceptable. I have 1 thousand inch. 

The other item I attended to was to add a Wixey laser guide ...



It tucks aware and is quite unobtrusive ...



It leaves a nice, clean line ...



... but it is a little wider than expected. The jury is out whether it is just a gimmick, or whether it will prove to be useful.

Regards from Perth

Derek
« Last Edit: December 14, 2019, 04:49 AM by derekcohen »

Offline Bob D.

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Re: Drill Press Table
« Reply #28 on: December 14, 2019, 04:41 AM »
Did you also check the spindle above the chuck?

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Offline rvieceli

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Re: Drill Press Table
« Reply #29 on: December 14, 2019, 08:25 AM »
@derekcohen consider picking up a precision ground dowel pin from 4 - 6 inches long. I use a 1/2 inch one. IF you are all metric a 12 mm would probably be your choice. They are manufactured to very tight tolerance. Here is a 12mm from McMaster Carr, you should be able to find similar from a supply house down there.

https://www.mcmaster.com/91585a972

This gives a bigger target fro the caliper and you know it is straight and hasn't been flexed.

You can also do some other tests as well in addition to the run out. Chuck it up and then use an engineer's square or a 1-2-3 block to check that everything is perpendicular to the table in all directions. You may have to shim your table to get it straight.

With the pin chucked, you always know the outside edge of the pin is a constant half the diameter to the center point. With my !/2 pin, if I want to place a hole 1.5 inches from an edge, I place a 1 inch and a 1/4 inch spacer between the fence and the pin and it is 1 1/2 every time.

Ron

Online Cheese

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Re: Drill Press Table
« Reply #30 on: December 14, 2019, 10:02 AM »
This reads 0.045mm run out. That is 0.0017" run out. Is that good or bad?

My understanding is: there is run out that may occur with the spindle, then there is run out that will occur at the chuck and quill (which could also be measured separately), and finally there is the run out measured at the bit. The results here are a total of all these together. It was mentioned to me that around 5 thousands of an inch would be acceptable. I have 1 thousand inch. 


Albrecht guarantees their chucks to have .0015" run out or less. As you're measuring .0017" total for everything....you're good to go.

You do point out one of the potential disadvantages in having a chuck with a removable arbor. Every interface provides another opportunity for a small amount of error.

However, in the real world I've never seen that as a viable issue because all of those interfaces are ground surfaces. Where the issue usually lies is in the quill itself or how well the chuck jaws center the drill bit.

I think you'll come to enjoy using the Wixey laser, I know I have. It gets you consistency and repeatability rather than just eyeballing it. If I need absolute accuracy say between 2 holes, I'll shut off the laser, insert this wiggler/center finder and manually pick up the centers.


Festool USA does not pre-approve the contents of this website nor endorse the application or use of any Festool product in any way other than in the manner described in the Festool Instruction Manual. To reduce the risk of serious injury and/or damage to your Festool product, always read, understand and follow all warnings and instructions in your Festool product's Instruction Manual. Although Festool strives for accuracy in the website material, the website may contain inaccuracies. Festool makes no representations about the accuracy, reliability, completeness or timeliness of the material on this website or about the results to be obtained from using the website. Festool and its affiliates cannot be responsible for improper postings or your reliance on the website's material. Your use of any material contained on this website is entirely at your own risk. The content contained on this site is provided for informational purposes only and does not constitute professional advice.


Offline Jiggy Joiner

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Re: Drill Press Table
« Reply #31 on: December 14, 2019, 10:42 AM »
I was concerned also with having a separate arbor, for the reasons Cheese has stated but, I wanted the option to be able to use the chuck on other machines, which might have different to MT 2 fitment.

To clear any doubts about runout, I first tested just the quill on my Voyager, the result was very good almost no needle movement. Then I did tests with various arbors, and the best was with a Rohm, as I couldn’t source an Albrecht.
Then I ran a test with the chuck, which was well within range, I can’t remember the actual reading but, it was good.

As your chuck isn’t a genuine Albrecht, I’d be very happy with that reading, and you saved a few bob too.

I think the reading that matters most is at the quill/spindle. If that’s all good you have a great starting point.

The wide beam on the Wixey, was something that niggled me a little at first but, I’m used to it now, and take no notice. It was only a previous Jet drill press, that had a fine laser on it, that made me aware.
The Jet had awful runout though, and was returned after two days.

Offline Michael Kellough

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Re: Drill Press Table
« Reply #32 on: December 14, 2019, 01:57 PM »
It’s easier to “read” the laser lines if you shine a bright light on the same spot. It kinda washes away the peripheral part of the laser line leaving just the center.

An led on a gooseneck would be good but I haven’t gotten around to it. In the meant I use an led flashlight that has a magnet. The magnet is just to store the light on the machine.

Offline Mario Turcot

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Re: Drill Press Table
« Reply #33 on: December 14, 2019, 07:44 PM »
@derekcohen About the laser. The thing I appreciated the most with the laser, is the fact that the table can swing left or right. Each time you move the table, up or down, it will slightly shift out from the center. With the laser it's easy to lock it in the center, or on your stock.

Nice addition.  [thumbs up]
Mario

Online derekcohen

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Re: Drill Press Table
« Reply #34 on: December 15, 2019, 08:29 AM »
Mario, that occured to me as well. Thanks.

Hey, it's a new drill press, and it's Christmas. So I added lights ...

Good lighting is helpful. On my old drill press I used a LED book light. This was transferred over ..



It occurred to me to try another light I have used on other equipment, and that I should pass this on to everyone.

Light off ...



Light on ...



For such a small light, it is very bright ...





... and cheap (from eBay) ...



Adds light to the bandsaw ...



... and bench grinder ..



Regards from Perth

Derek

Offline rmhinden

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Re: Drill Press Table
« Reply #35 on: February 20, 2020, 11:15 PM »
Inspired by Derek Cohen @derekcohen, I designed and built a table for my old Delta Drill press.

I couldn't find a UHMW slab to use, so I used 3/4" baltic birch plywood.   I like the Kreg bench clamps, so I decided to use the clamps along with the Kreg clamp tracks.   They are designed to sit below 3/4" plywood, are very strong, and have dual T-slots to secure them.   I glued up two layers of baltic birch plywood and used separate pieces between the tracks.   The result is very strong and stiff.

I used one section of track cut in half for the top for the clamps.   I took me a while to figure out I could use another piece as a fence with some attachments that I made.    I think with some other brackets, I can also use the fence on it's edge if needed.

Here is how it came out:



and a close up of the way the track are secured:



I started out with a deeper table (w/ a notch for the drill press column), but decided it was too big and made it hard to raise the table.  When I made is shorter, I realized that the tracks would extend over the edge.  I thought about shortening them, but then noticed I can move the track further back, so I left them.

The table is secured to the drill press metal table with cleats and clamps.  It is very secure and easy to remove.  In the picture, you can also see the bolts that hold the track.



I made a 4" diameter hole to have removable inserts.  I did this with my OF1010 and a round circle template.  Then made a circle cutting jig for my bandsaw to cut the 4" inserts.   I now have enough inserts for a long while :-)

Overall, I think it came out very well.   Using the Kreg clamps and track was somewhat of an experiment, I haven't seen them used for a drill press before.   The result seems very good.  I really like the auto-adjusting feature of the clamps.   A few more pictures below.

Bob










Offline Bob D.

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Re: Drill Press Table
« Reply #36 on: February 21, 2020, 04:51 PM »
Nice, I attached my DP table using the same type clamps. It has worked out great for the past year and as you said easy on and off.

I like your fence.
-----
It's a table saw, do you know where your fingers are?

Offline Bernmc

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Re: Drill Press Table
« Reply #37 on: February 21, 2020, 07:34 PM »
Looks good. The bit I'd do differently would be to make the inserts square instead of round - that way it's a few quick cuts on the table saw to make a new one

Offline rmhinden

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Re: Drill Press Table
« Reply #38 on: February 21, 2020, 07:43 PM »
Looks good. The bit I'd do differently would be to make the inserts square instead of round - that way it's a few quick cuts on the table saw to make a new one

Thanks,  I think I will get more use out of the rounds ones.

Also, now that I have a circle cutting jig for my bandsaw, it quite easy to make more round inserts.



I marked a line on it so I can get repeatable settings.

Online derekcohen

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Re: Drill Press Table
« Reply #39 on: February 21, 2020, 08:45 PM »
Looks good. The bit I'd do differently would be to make the inserts square instead of round - that way it's a few quick cuts on the table saw to make a new one

Bern, I mentioned why round earlier on. I made a bunch, and these took a short period of time. Of course, others may not find this so. Round offers infinite turning and a fresh face. Square is much more limited in this regard.

Regards from Perth

Derek

Offline Bernmc

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Re: Drill Press Table
« Reply #40 on: February 21, 2020, 08:50 PM »
Bern, I mentioned why round earlier on. I made a bunch, and these took a short period of time.

That is because you are a craftsman and I am a hack!

Offline Bob D.

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Re: Drill Press Table
« Reply #41 on: February 22, 2020, 07:51 AM »
If I was building my own table after reading this thread and Dereks' comments I would go with the round insert. 

But I have a DP table from WP and the insert is square so not really an option unless I cut a round insert to fit the square opening in the table. I guess I could fill in the corners with the offcuts from the circular inserts.
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Online Cheese

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Re: Drill Press Table
« Reply #42 on: February 22, 2020, 09:34 AM »
But I have a DP table from WP and the insert is square so not really an option unless I cut a round insert to fit the square opening in the table. I guess I could fill in the corners with the offcuts from the circular inserts.

Bob, that's exactly what I'm going to do...plus I'll leave the corners open to use as a finger pull. I won't be drilling near the corners anyways.

Offline rst

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Re: Drill Press Table
« Reply #43 on: February 22, 2020, 11:30 AM »
I made my own table and made my insert square.  I can replace the insert in much less time than making a round.  Although I could make rounds easily now with my Shaper.

Offline Mario Turcot

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Re: Drill Press Table
« Reply #44 on: February 22, 2020, 12:08 PM »
This seems to look like The Battle Of The Insert  [big grin]

Even before you consider the shape, there is two phylosophy about inserts. For efficiency purpose, those two are far the most important.

1) Dead center insert
2) Offset insert

Obviously the dead center is the least efficient. With offset inserts, you give your self more flexibilities. Square versus circle. The square gives you four faces, where the circle give you virtually unlimited faces. This for both depend of the bit size, if you use a 1/8 bit you'll have a many of itteratoins. If you use a 2"1/2, very few itteration.

Just a thought!
Mario