Author Topic: Drill Press Table  (Read 3200 times)

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Offline Cheese

  • Posts: 7022
Re: Drill Press Table
« Reply #30 on: December 14, 2019, 10:02 AM »
This reads 0.045mm run out. That is 0.0017" run out. Is that good or bad?

My understanding is: there is run out that may occur with the spindle, then there is run out that will occur at the chuck and quill (which could also be measured separately), and finally there is the run out measured at the bit. The results here are a total of all these together. It was mentioned to me that around 5 thousands of an inch would be acceptable. I have 1 thousand inch. 


Albrecht guarantees their chucks to have .0015" run out or less. As you're measuring .0017" total for everything....you're good to go.

You do point out one of the potential disadvantages in having a chuck with a removable arbor. Every interface provides another opportunity for a small amount of error.

However, in the real world I've never seen that as a viable issue because all of those interfaces are ground surfaces. Where the issue usually lies is in the quill itself or how well the chuck jaws center the drill bit.

I think you'll come to enjoy using the Wixey laser, I know I have. It gets you consistency and repeatability rather than just eyeballing it. If I need absolute accuracy say between 2 holes, I'll shut off the laser, insert this wiggler/center finder and manually pick up the centers.


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Offline Jiggy Joiner

  • Posts: 961
Re: Drill Press Table
« Reply #31 on: December 14, 2019, 10:42 AM »
I was concerned also with having a separate arbor, for the reasons Cheese has stated but, I wanted the option to be able to use the chuck on other machines, which might have different to MT 2 fitment.

To clear any doubts about runout, I first tested just the quill on my Voyager, the result was very good almost no needle movement. Then I did tests with various arbors, and the best was with a Rohm, as I couldn’t source an Albrecht.
Then I ran a test with the chuck, which was well within range, I can’t remember the actual reading but, it was good.

As your chuck isn’t a genuine Albrecht, I’d be very happy with that reading, and you saved a few bob too.

I think the reading that matters most is at the quill/spindle. If that’s all good you have a great starting point.

The wide beam on the Wixey, was something that niggled me a little at first but, I’m used to it now, and take no notice. It was only a previous Jet drill press, that had a fine laser on it, that made me aware.
The Jet had awful runout though, and was returned after two days.

Offline Michael Kellough

  • Posts: 4634
Re: Drill Press Table
« Reply #32 on: December 14, 2019, 01:57 PM »
It’s easier to “read” the laser lines if you shine a bright light on the same spot. It kinda washes away the peripheral part of the laser line leaving just the center.

An led on a gooseneck would be good but I haven’t gotten around to it. In the meant I use an led flashlight that has a magnet. The magnet is just to store the light on the machine.

Offline Mario Turcot

  • Posts: 1108
Re: Drill Press Table
« Reply #33 on: December 14, 2019, 07:44 PM »
@derekcohen About the laser. The thing I appreciated the most with the laser, is the fact that the table can swing left or right. Each time you move the table, up or down, it will slightly shift out from the center. With the laser it's easy to lock it in the center, or on your stock.

Nice addition.  [thumbs up]
Mario

Offline derekcohen

  • Posts: 412
    • In The Woodshop
Re: Drill Press Table
« Reply #34 on: December 15, 2019, 08:29 AM »
Mario, that occured to me as well. Thanks.

Hey, it's a new drill press, and it's Christmas. So I added lights ...

Good lighting is helpful. On my old drill press I used a LED book light. This was transferred over ..



It occurred to me to try another light I have used on other equipment, and that I should pass this on to everyone.

Light off ...



Light on ...



For such a small light, it is very bright ...





... and cheap (from eBay) ...



Adds light to the bandsaw ...



... and bench grinder ..



Regards from Perth

Derek

Offline rmhinden

  • Posts: 253
Re: Drill Press Table
« Reply #35 on: February 20, 2020, 11:15 PM »
Inspired by Derek Cohen @derekcohen, I designed and built a table for my old Delta Drill press.

I couldn't find a UHMW slab to use, so I used 3/4" baltic birch plywood.   I like the Kreg bench clamps, so I decided to use the clamps along with the Kreg clamp tracks.   They are designed to sit below 3/4" plywood, are very strong, and have dual T-slots to secure them.   I glued up two layers of baltic birch plywood and used separate pieces between the tracks.   The result is very strong and stiff.

I used one section of track cut in half for the top for the clamps.   I took me a while to figure out I could use another piece as a fence with some attachments that I made.    I think with some other brackets, I can also use the fence on it's edge if needed.

Here is how it came out:



and a close up of the way the track are secured:



I started out with a deeper table (w/ a notch for the drill press column), but decided it was too big and made it hard to raise the table.  When I made is shorter, I realized that the tracks would extend over the edge.  I thought about shortening them, but then noticed I can move the track further back, so I left them.

The table is secured to the drill press metal table with cleats and clamps.  It is very secure and easy to remove.  In the picture, you can also see the bolts that hold the track.



I made a 4" diameter hole to have removable inserts.  I did this with my OF1010 and a round circle template.  Then made a circle cutting jig for my bandsaw to cut the 4" inserts.   I now have enough inserts for a long while :-)

Overall, I think it came out very well.   Using the Kreg clamps and track was somewhat of an experiment, I haven't seen them used for a drill press before.   The result seems very good.  I really like the auto-adjusting feature of the clamps.   A few more pictures below.

Bob










Offline Bob D.

  • Posts: 1571
Re: Drill Press Table
« Reply #36 on: February 21, 2020, 04:51 PM »
Nice, I attached my DP table using the same type clamps. It has worked out great for the past year and as you said easy on and off.

I like your fence.
-----
It's a table saw, do you know where your fingers are?

Offline Bernmc

  • Posts: 56
Re: Drill Press Table
« Reply #37 on: February 21, 2020, 07:34 PM »
Looks good. The bit I'd do differently would be to make the inserts square instead of round - that way it's a few quick cuts on the table saw to make a new one

Offline rmhinden

  • Posts: 253
Re: Drill Press Table
« Reply #38 on: February 21, 2020, 07:43 PM »
Looks good. The bit I'd do differently would be to make the inserts square instead of round - that way it's a few quick cuts on the table saw to make a new one

Thanks,  I think I will get more use out of the rounds ones.

Also, now that I have a circle cutting jig for my bandsaw, it quite easy to make more round inserts.



I marked a line on it so I can get repeatable settings.

Offline derekcohen

  • Posts: 412
    • In The Woodshop
Re: Drill Press Table
« Reply #39 on: February 21, 2020, 08:45 PM »
Looks good. The bit I'd do differently would be to make the inserts square instead of round - that way it's a few quick cuts on the table saw to make a new one

Bern, I mentioned why round earlier on. I made a bunch, and these took a short period of time. Of course, others may not find this so. Round offers infinite turning and a fresh face. Square is much more limited in this regard.

Regards from Perth

Derek

Offline Bernmc

  • Posts: 56
Re: Drill Press Table
« Reply #40 on: February 21, 2020, 08:50 PM »
Bern, I mentioned why round earlier on. I made a bunch, and these took a short period of time.

That is because you are a craftsman and I am a hack!

Offline Bob D.

  • Posts: 1571
Re: Drill Press Table
« Reply #41 on: February 22, 2020, 07:51 AM »
If I was building my own table after reading this thread and Dereks' comments I would go with the round insert. 

But I have a DP table from WP and the insert is square so not really an option unless I cut a round insert to fit the square opening in the table. I guess I could fill in the corners with the offcuts from the circular inserts.
-----
It's a table saw, do you know where your fingers are?

Offline Cheese

  • Posts: 7022
Re: Drill Press Table
« Reply #42 on: February 22, 2020, 09:34 AM »
But I have a DP table from WP and the insert is square so not really an option unless I cut a round insert to fit the square opening in the table. I guess I could fill in the corners with the offcuts from the circular inserts.

Bob, that's exactly what I'm going to do...plus I'll leave the corners open to use as a finger pull. I won't be drilling near the corners anyways.

Offline rst

  • Posts: 2308
Re: Drill Press Table
« Reply #43 on: February 22, 2020, 11:30 AM »
I made my own table and made my insert square.  I can replace the insert in much less time than making a round.  Although I could make rounds easily now with my Shaper.

Offline Mario Turcot

  • Posts: 1108
Re: Drill Press Table
« Reply #44 on: February 22, 2020, 12:08 PM »
This seems to look like The Battle Of The Insert  [big grin]

Even before you consider the shape, there is two phylosophy about inserts. For efficiency purpose, those two are far the most important.

1) Dead center insert
2) Offset insert

Obviously the dead center is the least efficient. With offset inserts, you give your self more flexibilities. Square versus circle. The square gives you four faces, where the circle give you virtually unlimited faces. This for both depend of the bit size, if you use a 1/8 bit you'll have a many of itteratoins. If you use a 2"1/2, very few itteration.

Just a thought!
Mario