Author Topic: Blade for Resawing 8/4 x 10 Inch Cherry  (Read 2807 times)

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Offline Bob D.

  • Posts: 2295
Blade for Resawing 8/4 x 10 Inch Cherry
« on: July 31, 2021, 04:54 PM »
I have some 8/4 cherry I need to resaw for a project to make a bookmatched table top.

I'm looking at the Woodslicer 3/4" x 111" to fit my Rikon bandsaw. I've heard good
reports but wondering anyone thinks there is something better out there. Blades are
~$40 plus shipping. I will probably get two just so I'm not caught if I mangle one or it
breaks. I have about 16 lineal feet to resaw and one blade should do that no sweat.

Only place I know to get this particular blade is from Highland Hardware.
https://www.highlandwoodworking.com/wood-slicer-resaw-bandsaw-blades.aspx
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It's a table saw, do you know where your fingers are?

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Offline Rob Z

  • Posts: 1042
Re: Blade for Resawing 8/4 x 10 Inch Cherry
« Reply #1 on: July 31, 2021, 05:43 PM »
Bob, I had one of those blades for several years on a bandsaw that I recently sold.  I don't recall any problems or other issues and felt it was a quality blade for the price paid.

Offline JD2720

  • Posts: 1229
Re: Blade for Resawing 8/4 x 10 Inch Cherry
« Reply #2 on: July 31, 2021, 09:01 PM »
I have been using Woodslicer blades for many years. I have been very happy with them.

Offline Bob D.

  • Posts: 2295
Re: Blade for Resawing 8/4 x 10 Inch Cherry
« Reply #3 on: July 31, 2021, 09:50 PM »
Thanks everyone. I ordered the Woodslicer.
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It's a table saw, do you know where your fingers are?

Offline JohnnyEgo

  • Posts: 18
Re: Blade for Resawing 8/4 x 10 Inch Cherry
« Reply #4 on: August 03, 2021, 04:27 PM »
I think you made a fine choice, but for what it is worth, I have had great experience with a 3/4" Laguna Resaw King on my 14" bandsaw, and I have recently used it to resaw 8/4 x 8" cherry without any problems.  I've had it for a while now, and while it definitely does not cut as quickly as it did when new, it is still cutting and running smooth. 

Offline Bob D.

  • Posts: 2295
Re: Blade for Resawing 8/4 x 10 Inch Cherry
« Reply #5 on: August 03, 2021, 06:17 PM »
Thanks, does Laguna make a 111" blade?

That's what the Rikon bandsaw uses.
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It's a table saw, do you know where your fingers are?

Offline Crazyraceguy

  • Posts: 695
Re: Blade for Resawing 8/4 x 10 Inch Cherry
« Reply #6 on: August 03, 2021, 06:50 PM »
I have always used Woodslicer blades on my personal saw at home and we started using them at work too a few years ago. They have been great, even on my "not so great" 14" Rigid with a riser block.
CSX
DF500 + assortment set
PS420 + Base kit
OF1010
OF1400
MFK700 (2)
TS55, FS1080, FS1400 holey, FS1900, FS3000
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RO90
RO125
ETS EC 125
RAS115
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Offline JohnnyEgo

  • Posts: 18
Re: Blade for Resawing 8/4 x 10 Inch Cherry
« Reply #7 on: August 03, 2021, 11:29 PM »
Thanks, does Laguna make a 111" blade?

That's what the Rikon bandsaw uses.

They do.  I was in a similar boat as you, but with less patience and a willingness to throw money at the problem in front of me.  I planned on ordering a Woodslicer, but the lumber yard I use had a Resaw King on the shelf and it appealed to my short attention span.  It's done the job well enough that I never got around to ordering that Woodslicer.  I have heard on forums such as these that the Woodslicer is better for veneer when new, but the Resaw King can be resharpened and lasts a good bit longer.  I mostly resaw for splitting boards into fairly thick stock, so my tolerances are probably a lot looser than someone needing thin veneer.  I do know it requires a fair bit of tension.  My 14BX does it without a problem, and it tracks very straight and true. 

It is substantially more expensive than the Woodslicer, but it has lasted a good length of time splitting a lot of boards without fail.  And it was available locally.  I have no regrets.

Offline Bob D.

  • Posts: 2295
Re: Blade for Resawing 8/4 x 10 Inch Cherry
« Reply #8 on: August 04, 2021, 05:09 AM »
Good to know. There is nothing available to me locally.

Closest would be Woodcraft which is in the neighboring
state of Delaware and 38 miles plus a $5 bridge toll away.
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It's a table saw, do you know where your fingers are?

Offline Cheese

  • Posts: 8906
Re: Blade for Resawing 8/4 x 10 Inch Cherry
« Reply #9 on: August 04, 2021, 11:48 AM »
When I rebuilt my Delta 2 years ago, I did a lot of research and I narrowed my choice down to the Woodslicer, the Laguna Resaw King and the DoAll Penetrator. I think any one of them would perform well.

I finally decided on the DoAll because of its hardness and that it's designed to cut stainless or difficult to machine metals. It's made from M42 and initially it has a 67-69 Rc hardness and then it's TiN coated to produce a 83 Rc hardness.

A few years ago, I heard some reports that the Resaw King was prone to cracking on the smaller diameter wheels. I don't know if that's still the situation now.

Offline Bertotti

  • Posts: 239
Re: Blade for Resawing 8/4 x 10 Inch Cherry
« Reply #10 on: August 09, 2021, 11:36 PM »
Been using Timberwolf myself and they have always worked for me.
I haven't bought any in a few years though. My last order has kept me covered for years now. Using them on a 14"Jet with the 6" risers installed.
https://www.timberwolfblades.com
I want to populate SD with trees because I miss the forests of the river bottoms.

Offline Bob D.

  • Posts: 2295
Re: Blade for Resawing 8/4 x 10 Inch Cherry
« Reply #11 on: August 19, 2021, 08:36 PM »
After going over my BS the other day and finding a bad bearing, I ordered some replacements and they arrived today from McMaster. I looked on the Rikon parts website but it says out of stock. Plus they have the bearings only available as a kit of 6. OK, 3 upper and 3 lower but the saw uses different size bearings for the upper and lowers guides and their kit has six all the same size so not gonna work.

So questionable parts and not available to boot I looked elsewhere. They are a standard 6001RS ABEC1 bearing so I found them fast on McMaster and ordered three. The upper bearing all seem fine so I didn't order any of those.

Put the new bearings in and adjusted and the blade adjusted and tracking OK. Blade runs true. I set for .2mm clearance on each bearing and spinning the blade by hand not one bearing moves. Ran the saw at 50 RPM (blade cleaning mode) and checked how the blade was tracking and I heard a rub, so stopped to investigate and found that the blade guard rubs the upper wheel when it is near the top for maximum resaw capacity. So I fixed that then checked again at 200 FPM then 2000 and finally at 4000 FPM, all good.

So I made a test cut on a scarp of cherry 4 inches wide. Cut went fine and left a pretty smooth cut. I was impressed. I thought time to try it on the real deal. So I got the widest of the three boards I need to resaw figuring I would do the toughest one while the bade was still at its best. It was very slow cutting, at least I think it was. I recorded a video with my phone and when I checked the time from start to finish it took 8 minutes and 5 seconds and the piece is 44 inches long x 11 inches wide. That's 11.022 seconds per inch. Does that seem slow to you? I was running the blade at 4000 FPM and I expected it to go a little faster, but this was my first cut on a piece over 8 inches since I put the new motor on a while back.
« Last Edit: August 20, 2021, 07:20 AM by Bob D. »
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It's a table saw, do you know where your fingers are?

Offline grbmds

  • Posts: 2061
Re: Blade for Resawing 8/4 x 10 Inch Cherry
« Reply #12 on: August 19, 2021, 09:36 PM »
Since your blade is 111" I assume it's a 14" bandsaw. I will be curious to see how the 3/4" blade performs on the saw. I have a Rikon 325 Deluxe and, from everything I have read a 1/2" blade is best for resawing even though the saw has the capability for a 3/4" blade. I have never felt the need to use anything wider than 1/2". If the saw is set up correctly after installing a new blade, the 1/2" performs well; straight smooth cuts, no deflection.

I have had great success with Starrett blades. They seem to stay sharp longer than others, including the Woodslicer.
Randy

Offline Bob D.

  • Posts: 2295
Re: Blade for Resawing 8/4 x 10 Inch Cherry
« Reply #13 on: August 19, 2021, 10:58 PM »
Yes, it's a Rikon 10-325 with the Striatech DVR motor and Rikon 10-900 guide upgrade installed.

I never ran a 3/4" blade before that I remember. I've always used a 1/4 or 3/8 blade and had success. But I was not resawing anything over 8 inches in the past.

I've got the blade and the saw setup right. My problem is not the quality of the cut but the speed of cutting. And that's not a real issue because I have no time pressure. I was just expecting this highly touted blade to perform better than it has. And maybe that's something I've done wrong which is why I started this thread in the first place.

I have some 1/2" blades but I don't remember what type they are or the TPI, I'll have to look tomorrow. I think you're right though in that tensioning this 3/4" blade feels like its the limit for this bandsaw frame. The last two cuts are on narrower stock so they should go easier. I'll find out tomorrow.
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It's a table saw, do you know where your fingers are?

Offline grbmds

  • Posts: 2061
Re: Blade for Resawing 8/4 x 10 Inch Cherry
« Reply #14 on: August 19, 2021, 11:45 PM »
I resaw with 1/2" blades and have tried a number of them, including the Woodslicer, Carter, Starrett, and a couple others. I don't find the quality of cut much different. It's usually the setup that causes quality problems. A 1/2", 3 TPI, Skip Tooth blade does a great job. I don't believe that installing a 3/4" blade will resolve your desire for more speedy resaws. Only a large motor, generally translating to a larger saw, will resolve that.

I would just add one thing. Regardless of saw or blade, a slower speed will almost always produce a smoother cut, which means less planing or jointing and most likely more accuracy.

Over the years, almost everything I have learned about bandsaws points to using a 1/2" blade regardless of the fact that the saw could handle a 3/4". I have found that to tension any 1/2" blade to it's appropriate tension requires tensioning to the 5/8" mark. It would be difficult to tension a 3/4" blade to the correct  tension because it would need to tension above the maximum.

I will be interested to see your results if you use a 3/4".
Randy

Offline Bob D.

  • Posts: 2295
Re: Blade for Resawing 8/4 x 10 Inch Cherry
« Reply #15 on: August 20, 2021, 06:21 AM »
I did make one cut with this 3/4" blade yesterday. As I said the cut quality was good. I would have liked to have had a little more material to start with but my board was 1-9/16" (1.5625) after planing. Deducting 25 thou for the blade leaves two pieces 0.76875. After running through the planer to yield two boards the same thickness I ended up at 11/16" or 0.6875, so 1/16" less than my desired final thickness of 3/4". So I only removed about 81 thou from each board to get the sawn face flat again. I thought that was pretty good. It just went slower than I expected at ~11 seconds per inch. The lost 1/16 won't hurt anything in the end. These two pieces are for the table top and they don't have to match the thickness of any other piece in the table. As long as the two halves of the top are the same thickness they will be fine. They get attached to each other with hinges and the top is removable from this portable sewing table I am building. That 'lost' 1/16 will only reduce the weight of the top slightly and have no affect on its performance or function.

As I was running the boards through the planer I noticed that the bandsaw cut was fairly flat across the 11 inch width of the board. And coming right off the bandsaw when I separated the two pieces there was no sawdust remaining between the halves, indicating to me that all the sawdust was carried out by the blade and nothing remained to cause the blade to bind or wander off course. I should have taken some photos of the cut coming off the saw but I didn't. I went back and looked at the video I shot while cutting but I had stopped the camera before I separated and inspected the cut so nothing to be learned there.

I have a bad habit of doing that, I don't know why. I could have let the video run but I always find myself wanting to turn it off as soon as I think its no longer needed like I'm wasting film. I guess I'm still thinking in terms of actual film and forgetting that my 128GB SD card in the GoPro has hours of capacity and trimming is easy in post on the PC.

Here's the last few seconds of the cut.




And some photos I took this morning of the test piece I ran. This is a piece of the same cherry but only about 4 inches high.
These pieces have not been touched by a plane or sander, this is how they looked coming right off the saw.

Shown as run through the saw
334812-0

Splayed out after the cut to show the cut faces of each half
334814-1

Some ripples where I hit a soft spot and the blade advanced too fast
334818-2

This is the planned outer face on the left and the sawn inner face on the right for comparison.
334820-3
« Last Edit: August 20, 2021, 07:23 AM by Bob D. »
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It's a table saw, do you know where your fingers are?

Offline Bob D.

  • Posts: 2295
Re: Blade for Resawing 8/4 x 10 Inch Cherry
« Reply #16 on: August 20, 2021, 12:58 PM »
Well, I found my problem, at least I think so. I made my last two resaw cuts this morning and they were less than 8 inches so less load on the motor than the 11 inch piece yesterday. Those two cuts today came out fine as did the first it just went slower than I expected.

But when I was replacing the 3/4" blade and going back to a 1/4" blade and adjusting the lower guide bearings I happen to bump the drive belt tension handwheel with my shoulder and it was loose, way loose. I then checked the belt and yes it was very loose. So no doubt the belt was slipping yesterday and that was why it felt like I had no power. Took the belt off and inspected it and didn't see any damage so I put it back on. Finished setting the guides and everything seems fine with the 1/4" blade installed.

I don't know how long that belt has been running loose. There is no reason to change the belt tension except for jumping over to the other set of pulleys and that is only required if cutting stainless steel or titanium and I haven't been doing that. Right now it's a mystery but I will keep a closer eye on it and see if it gets lose again then figure out how and why.
« Last Edit: August 21, 2021, 06:03 AM by Bob D. »
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Offline Cheese

  • Posts: 8906
Re: Blade for Resawing 8/4 x 10 Inch Cherry
« Reply #17 on: August 21, 2021, 10:35 AM »
This comparison is amazing Bob...



Do you think the 11 seconds per inch rate was caused by the loose belt?  Or do you think that's a good rate of speed to maintain?

I'd never resaw that slow but with the results you got that's now a serious consideration. Also, the complete lack of sawdust between the pieces is also something I've never experienced, again by sawing that slow you're giving the sawdust a chance to escape.

Do you have dust extraction on your Rikon?

Is that blade the Woodslicer?

Offline Bob D.

  • Posts: 2295
Re: Blade for Resawing 8/4 x 10 Inch Cherry
« Reply #18 on: August 21, 2021, 07:28 PM »
I am reasonably sure that the loose belt was my problem. I don't know how much faster it would have cut. I just felt 8 minutes for this piece was long. Before I started I guessed it would take from 4 to 5, but that was just a WAG.

Yes, finding zero sawdust in there was amazing, and I am sure the low feed rate had a lot to do with that. Plus the 4000 FPM* blade speed with the DVR motor meant I was getting just over 7 revolutions of the blade for every inch of travel. That's 200 inches per second greater blade speed than the stock motor.
   * The stock motor gives 2950FPM on high and 1445 FPM on low speed.

4000FPM * 12 = 48000 blade inches/minute

48000/60 = 800 blade inches/second

800 * 3.5 TPI = 2800 teeth/sec

My feed rate was 11.022 seconds per inch or roughly .1 inches every 1.1 seconds, so if my math is right (feel free to check me) I was getting about ~3000 teeth moving through the work every tenth of an inch. That can move some sawdust.

Yes, I have my dust collector connected to the bandsaw. It grabs almost everything that hits the lower wheel cabinet, but I find the space under the table required to allow for tilting the table lets a lot of sawdust escape. I can't remember the last time I cut an angle other than 90 on this bandsaw, and I've had it since 2008. So I use some magnetic sheet material to stick on the corner of the lower wheel cabinet door and try to mask off as much of that open space as I can. It works sort of but the other two sides are still wide open and spill sawdust. I might try and setup a second collection point under the table. Been noodling on how I might do that for a while now and nothing has really impressed me as worth attempting.

Here's a short video of me sawing one of the legs. You can see zero sawdust when I separate the two pieces after the cut.
You'll also hear one of the upper guide bearings screaming during the cut. It started complaining during the first cut the day before. I ordered new bearings and they arrived today so I'll put those in tomorrow. Running these through the planer I only removed 48 thou to get them flat again.

« Last Edit: August 21, 2021, 08:23 PM by Bob D. »
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It's a table saw, do you know where your fingers are?

Offline Cheese

  • Posts: 8906
Re: Blade for Resawing 8/4 x 10 Inch Cherry
« Reply #19 on: August 22, 2021, 11:02 AM »
Ya, that's pretty impressive Bob when you separate the 2 halves & there's nothing inside.  [big grin]  I'm definitely going to try slowing down my feed rate and see how that works. My dust collection is under the band saw table using a 4" port and it really works well until...I separate the 2 halves and then there's sawdust every where. I drilled some holes in the ZC insert and that really helps in keeping the top of the table clean.




I also really like your technique of cutting at a lower blade guide height until you actually need additional height and then you just dial the extra height in. That makes a lot of sense.  [thumbs up]

I may have to try a 1/2" WoodSlicer blade as I've never had much luck with tensioning 3/4" wide blades, the saw just isn't capable even though Delta says it's ok.

Offline Bob D.

  • Posts: 2295
Re: Blade for Resawing 8/4 x 10 Inch Cherry
« Reply #20 on: August 22, 2021, 11:52 AM »
I think I would have been better off with a 1/2" blade. This 3/4" is more than the bandsaw frame likes when it comes to tensioning. But I'm stuck with it now until its worn out. I don't think I would buy another 3/4" blade (for this saw) knowing what I have learned first hand.

The height of that piece varied so much that I thought keeping the guard as close as possible would be worth the risk of adjusting it during the cut. It paid off I think.

Trying to plow through sawdust just makes the blade hotter and creates more friction so robs your saw of power. I need to remember not to push it and let the blade geometry dictate the rate of feed.

My ZCIs are full of holes from the factory. I don't have much sawdust collecting on top of the table. It seems to be directly under the table where it gets out of the airstream and makes a mess. I think I will stick a camera under there while cutting and find out what's really happening.
« Last Edit: August 22, 2021, 12:00 PM by Bob D. »
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It's a table saw, do you know where your fingers are?

Offline Cheese

  • Posts: 8906
Re: Blade for Resawing 8/4 x 10 Inch Cherry
« Reply #21 on: August 22, 2021, 12:15 PM »
I'm still amazed at the small amount of sawdust between the boards. The WoodSlicer band is .022" thick with a kerf of .031" so there isn't much room to evacuate the sawdust.

The DoAll Penetrator blade I'm using has a band that's .025" thick but a kerf of .044" so there's a lot more room for sawdust evacuation. It must be my self inflicted rapid feed rate that's killing me.  [tongue]

The WoodSlicer folk do say that the cut surfaces can be initially sanded with 100 grit paper and that dovetails nicely with your results. Thanks for posting this stuff...some really good things to think about.

Offline grbmds

  • Posts: 2061
Re: Blade for Resawing 8/4 x 10 Inch Cherry
« Reply #22 on: August 25, 2021, 04:42 PM »
Just for information purposes . . .most 14" bandsaws don't do well with 3/4" blades as they are not able to be tensioned to the correct tension. For example, my Rikon 325 Deluxe tensions a 1/2" blade properly at about the 5/8" mark on the tension gauge. It is unlikely I could tension a 3/4" blade enough to make it work properly. A 1/2" blade is sufficient for resawing. I've never had a problem with a 1/2" blade as long as I've spent the time to do the setup each time I install a new blade and sometimes after a lot of use.

A 3/4" blade won't speed up the feed rate. As far as I know, only a larger capacity bandsaw with a larger motor will do that. An 18" bandsaw, for example, would most likely be able to handle a 3/4" blade.

My experiences with the Woodslicer are OK but I have had much better success with other blades. The last blade I bought were Starrett and they work well. I've use Carter blades but I think the Starrett work better.

Also, for resawingm 3 TPI works best with a slow feed rate to get a good surface.
Randy

Offline Bob D.

  • Posts: 2295
Re: Blade for Resawing 8/4 x 10 Inch Cherry
« Reply #23 on: August 25, 2021, 09:20 PM »
How do you determine 'properly' on your Rikon 10-325. I'd like to know so I can use the same method.

Everything you've stated in this last post you said a couple days ago, except previously you said you'd like to see the results using the 3/4" blade.

I have provided that. And I agreed in my post the other day that my 10-325 (and I would expect any similar design/size bandsaw) had a tough time tensioning the blade. I was off the scale over 3/4" to get the blade where I felt it had enough tension. I think my cuts show that I did have enough tension. But again, as I said previously I would not want to run the saw with that much tension repeatedly.

I agree that a 3/4 blade" will not speed up the feed rate over a 1/2" blade. That is if by feed rate you mean the rate at which the cut can progress as in inches per minute of material moving past the blade. I do not believe that a larger size saw will increase the rate at which the material can be moved through the blade.

There are only three things that I know of that can do that, those are, in no particular order:

1. Blade style (tooth design and TPI) which dictates the size of the gullet between the teeth.
2. Next would be the speed at which the blade is moving (blade FPM).
3. The third would be the rate at which the operator feeds the piece into the blade.



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It's a table saw, do you know where your fingers are?

Offline Bertotti

  • Posts: 239
Re: Blade for Resawing 8/4 x 10 Inch Cherry
« Reply #24 on: August 26, 2021, 08:39 AM »
I am reasonably sure that the loose belt was my problem. I don't know how much faster it would have cut. I just felt 8 minutes for this piece was long. Before I started I guessed it would take from 4 to 5, but that was just a WAG.

Yes, finding zero sawdust in there was amazing, and I am sure the low feed rate had a lot to do with that. Plus the 4000 FPM* blade speed with the DVR motor meant I was getting just over 7 revolutions of the blade for every inch of travel. That's 200 inches per second greater blade speed than the stock motor.
   * The stock motor gives 2950FPM on high and 1445 FPM on low speed.

4000FPM * 12 = 48000 blade inches/minute

48000/60 = 800 blade inches/second

800 * 3.5 TPI = 2800 teeth/sec

My feed rate was 11.022 seconds per inch or roughly .1 inches every 1.1 seconds, so if my math is right (feel free to check me) I was getting about ~3000 teeth moving through the work every tenth of an inch. That can move some sawdust.

Yes, I have my dust collector connected to the bandsaw. It grabs almost everything that hits the lower wheel cabinet, but I find the space under the table required to allow for tilting the table lets a lot of sawdust escape. I can't remember the last time I cut an angle other than 90 on this bandsaw, and I've had it since 2008. So I use some magnetic sheet material to stick on the corner of the lower wheel cabinet door and try to mask off as much of that open space as I can. It works sort of but the other two sides are still wide open and spill sawdust. I might try and setup a second collection point under the table. Been noodling on how I might do that for a while now and nothing has really impressed me as worth attempting.

Here's a short video of me sawing one of the legs. You can see zero sawdust when I separate the two pieces after the cut.
You'll also hear one of the upper guide bearings screaming during the cut. It started complaining during the first cut the day before. I ordered new bearings and they arrived today so I'll put those in tomorrow. Running these through the planer I only removed 48 thou to get them flat again.



Nice video! It is cool at the end you can see where the blade exits the wood how well it is moving the dust from between the pieces. Thanks! I'm off for a 1/2" blade if my local shop carries them. Been running a 3/4 timber wolf on my 14' Jet with risers, and it works well but I can't help but wonder at the tension now that I have read this thread. I never cut as slow as you and that would explain the little run out I do get along with maybe the tension.
I want to populate SD with trees because I miss the forests of the river bottoms.

Offline Bob D.

  • Posts: 2295
Re: Blade for Resawing 8/4 x 10 Inch Cherry
« Reply #25 on: August 26, 2021, 10:20 AM »
Thanks, I might have been able to cut a little faster if the drive belt had been properly tensioned but that was not my goal.

I do think as others have pointed out that a 3/4" blade on this saw is first not necessary and secondly not going to improve the cut over a 1/2" blade. If the tooth geometry is the same all you gain is 1/4" more blade that is potentially dragging in the kerf and stealing power from your cut. Yes, the blade is narrower than the tooth set but it still impacts performance is my thought. I'm stuck with this 3/4 blade now and I will have to get my money's worth out of it but once that happens I will move to a 1/2" blade in the future.

I wish the DVR motor controller displayed the motor load in percent they way it does on the Voyager Drill Press. That could be helpful when you are cutting but also to take a initial reading when you install a new blade then use that as a basis to help determine when your blade is getting dull. Of course a big variable there is the wood you are cutting so maybe not as helpful as it might seem.
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It's a table saw, do you know where your fingers are?

Offline grbmds

  • Posts: 2061
Re: Blade for Resawing 8/4 x 10 Inch Cherry
« Reply #26 on: August 27, 2021, 11:02 AM »
How do you determine 'properly' on your Rikon 10-325. I'd like to know so I can use the same method.

Everything you've stated in this last post you said a couple days ago, except previously you said you'd like to see the results using the 3/4" blade.

I have provided that. And I agreed in my post the other day that my 10-325 (and I would expect any similar design/size bandsaw) had a tough time tensioning the blade. I was off the scale over 3/4" to get the blade where I felt it had enough tension. I think my cuts show that I did have enough tension. But again, as I said previously I would not want to run the saw with that much tension repeatedly.

I agree that a 3/4 blade" will not speed up the feed rate over a 1/2" blade. That is if by feed rate you mean the rate at which the cut can progress as in inches per minute of material moving past the blade. I do not believe that a larger size saw will increase the rate at which the material can be moved through the blade.

There are only three things that I know of that can do that, those are, in no particular order:

1. Blade style (tooth design and TPI) which dictates the size of the gullet between the teeth.
2. Next would be the speed at which the blade is moving (blade FPM).
3. The third would be the rate at which the operator feeds the piece into the blade.
@Bob D.  For about the past 5 years I follow the set of steps that Alex Snodgrass has laid out at past woodworking shows. These are also detailed in a pamphlet that Carter Products sells. There are also a couple of videos on YouTube showing the process, one via The Wood Whisperer in his shop and a couple of others; some a bit more detailed than others.

The thing I've realized is that these steps must be followed, not only each time a new blade (or even a different blade) is installed, but at least checked periodically during the life of a single blade while on the saw. I especially check the setting of guides and the bearing behind the blade after a long session of cutting circular blanks for turning. If all I'm doing is ripping, crosscutting, or resawing, the setup probably isn't disturbed and doesn't need to be checked. Alex Snodgrass says at all his demos at woodworking shows that, if you use a blade to cut curves or circles, the set in the blade can be changed due to heat build-up and recommends dedicating blades to resawing.

I have never had any success with the fence that came with my saw. Instead, I purchased the Magfence from Carter because it allows me to set the fence exactly where I want it on my bandsaw table and it can be used on other cast iron or steel surfaces. There is no magic about this fence, however. I've seen many homemade fences on YouTube and elsewhere that would work as well. However, the Rikon fence, in my opinion, is not a good one and I was never able to get it to lock down square, even though Rikon sent me a second fence when I reported the first one wasn't able to be set.

Finally, there are other setup videos out there and I suppose most of them work. However, the Alex Snodgrass method allows me to resaw without worrying about drift or any of the other problems that people report with resawing. Once I'm done with the setup and only use that setup to resaw, I  get resaw cuts as smooth and straight as required to get slices off a board. Do I still need to surface the resawed face? Sure, but I don't usually need to take much off to get it smooth and flat, but I still need to allow sufficient thickness when resawing just in case.
Randy

Offline jcrowe1950

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Re: Blade for Resawing 8/4 x 10 Inch Cherry
« Reply #27 on: August 27, 2021, 01:23 PM »

@Bob D.  For about the past 5 years I follow the set of steps that Alex Snodgrass has laid out at past woodworking shows. These are also detailed in a pamphlet that Carter Products sells. There are also a couple of videos on YouTube showing the process, one via The Wood Whisperer in his shop and a couple of others; some a bit more detailed than others.

The thing I've realized is that these steps must be followed, not only each time a new blade (or even a different blade) is installed, but at least checked periodically during the life of a single blade while on the saw. I especially check the setting of guides and the bearing behind the blade after a long session of cutting circular blanks for turning. If all I'm doing is ripping, crosscutting, or resawing, the setup probably isn't disturbed and doesn't need to be checked. Alex Snodgrass says at all his demos at woodworking shows that, if you use a blade to cut curves or circles, the set in the blade can be changed due to heat build-up and recommends dedicating blades to resawing.


Hi Randy, Bob, et al.,

    I agree about the value of Alex Snodgrass' advice especially WRT to centering the back of the gullets on the center of the crown. IMO, this is what limits this class of saw in supporting a 3/4" bandsaw blade. My previous bandsaw was a Minimax 16 with flat tires on the wheels. This totally supported the width of the blades and made re sawing operations a dream. I now have the same Rikon 10-325 that a number of you have mentioned. I recently upgraded to the newer toolless Rikon guide bearings and they are a significant improvement. Still not up to the standards of the Minimax, but they provide more bearing surface by being larger diameter and twice as thick. That said, it's worth insuring that none of the bearings actually are activated until there is a slight load either on the thrust bearing and/or the side bearings. Alex Snodgrass has an excellent method of said adjustment.
I have never had any success with the fence that came with my saw. Instead, I purchased the Magfence from Carter because it allows me to set the fence exactly where I want it on my bandsaw table and it can be used on other cast iron or steel surfaces. There is no magic about this fence, however. I've seen many homemade fences on YouTube and elsewhere that would work as well. However, the Rikon fence, in my opinion, is not a good one and I was never able to get it to lock down square, even though Rikon sent me a second fence when I reported the first one wasn't able to be set.


   The newer Rikon bandsaws do address the fence issue somewhat. I agree that the original 10-325 fence was sub optimal....it is too short for resaw operations and there's no easy way to attach an auxiliary fence. For resaw operations a square to the table fence is very important as well as insuring that the blade is square to the table. Also, I am currently using a GRR-Ripper to apply even, square pressure when resawwing....it's a pretty neat solution.

Finally, there are other setup videos out there and I suppose most of them work. However, the Alex Snodgrass method allows me to resaw without worrying about drift or any of the other problems that people report with resawing. Once I'm done with the setup and only use that setup to resaw, I  get resaw cuts as smooth and straight as required to get slices off a board. Do I still need to surface the resawed face? Sure, but I don't usually need to take much off to get it smooth and flat, but I still need to allow sufficient thickness when resawing just in case.

Great observations.... [thanks]
Festool Specialist at Woodcraft, Chattanooga, TN

Latest Festool purchase...TID18 T18 set....love them

Offline Bob D.

  • Posts: 2295
Re: Blade for Resawing 8/4 x 10 Inch Cherry
« Reply #28 on: August 27, 2021, 02:20 PM »
How do you determine 'properly' on your Rikon 10-325. I'd like to know so I can use the same method.

Everything you've stated in this last post you said a couple days ago, except previously you said you'd like to see the results using the 3/4" blade.

I have provided that. And I agreed in my post the other day that my 10-325 (and I would expect any similar design/size bandsaw) had a tough time tensioning the blade. I was off the scale over 3/4" to get the blade where I felt it had enough tension. I think my cuts show that I did have enough tension. But again, as I said previously I would not want to run the saw with that much tension repeatedly.

I agree that a 3/4 blade" will not speed up the feed rate over a 1/2" blade. That is if by feed rate you mean the rate at which the cut can progress as in inches per minute of material moving past the blade. I do not believe that a larger size saw will increase the rate at which the material can be moved through the blade.

There are only three things that I know of that can do that, those are, in no particular order:

1. Blade style (tooth design and TPI) which dictates the size of the gullet between the teeth.
2. Next would be the speed at which the blade is moving (blade FPM).
3. The third would be the rate at which the operator feeds the piece into the blade.
@Bob D.  For about the past 5 years I follow the set of steps that Alex Snodgrass has laid out at past woodworking shows. These are also detailed in a pamphlet that Carter Products sells. There are also a couple of videos on YouTube showing the process, one via The Wood Whisperer in his shop and a couple of others; some a bit more detailed than others.

The thing I've realized is that these steps must be followed, not only each time a new blade (or even a different blade) is installed, but at least checked periodically during the life of a single blade while on the saw. I especially check the setting of guides and the bearing behind the blade after a long session of cutting circular blanks for turning. If all I'm doing is ripping, crosscutting, or resawing, the setup probably isn't disturbed and doesn't need to be checked. Alex Snodgrass says at all his demos at woodworking shows that, if you use a blade to cut curves or circles, the set in the blade can be changed due to heat build-up and recommends dedicating blades to resawing.

I have never had any success with the fence that came with my saw. Instead, I purchased the Magfence from Carter because it allows me to set the fence exactly where I want it on my bandsaw table and it can be used on other cast iron or steel surfaces. There is no magic about this fence, however. I've seen many homemade fences on YouTube and elsewhere that would work as well. However, the Rikon fence, in my opinion, is not a good one and I was never able to get it to lock down square, even though Rikon sent me a second fence when I reported the first one wasn't able to be set.

Finally, there are other setup videos out there and I suppose most of them work. However, the Alex Snodgrass method allows me to resaw without worrying about drift or any of the other problems that people report with resawing. Once I'm done with the setup and only use that setup to resaw, I  get resaw cuts as smooth and straight as required to get slices off a board. Do I still need to surface the resawed face? Sure, but I don't usually need to take much off to get it smooth and flat, but I still need to allow sufficient thickness when resawing just in case.



I don't know why you are directing your reply at me (I say that because you tagged me in your response) as you didn't answer my question.

Which was:  How do YOU determine 'properly' on your Rikon 10-325. I'd like to know so I can use the same method.

did you just figure it out by watching Alex at a WWing show or from watching YT videos, or did you develop a method to take accurate measurements of blade tension or maybe use one of the available overpriced blade tension gauges, none of which come with any calibration certs so they are $400 pieces of junk.

I know who Alex is and yeah I've watched him at many WWing shows over the past decade or two, all good but your comment concerning Alex no relation to the topic of my thread and means nothing in relation to what I have said or posted.  Tossing his name in there does not improve your position in my eyes.

Carter MagFence, yeah it's nice, pricey but nice. I have one and use it when I need it. You might even see it being used in the video I posted. So why do you tell me about something I already know of and use. Just because you can't get the Rikon fence to work for you doesn't mean that's the case for everyone or it's junk. I use mine all the time with no issues. I have thought about improvements to this fence and I have a new fence under development which will be a game changer for all bandsaws but sorry I can't share details at this time.

I had no issue with drift before or after installing the Woodslicer blade, so I don't know why you bring this up in your reply which you have directed at me. Anyone who has used a BS knows about blade drift. You telling me that you've conquered your drift problem has nothing to do with me resawing this cherry or the blade I used.

I've watched hours of video on setting up bandsaws and I've tried many of the techniques shown by Alex at WWing shows and by others. And I have read bandsaw book. I took what worked for me and I modified or adapted some of the methods of Alex and others to work for me and give me repeatable results on my saw.

When I changed the motor on my BS to the DVR motor 2 years ago, I took advantage of having the saw half torn apart to go over it thoroughly and fix all the issues I have found over the previous 8 years of use. I actually bought the Carter micro-adjust guide bearing 'upgrade' kit for the 10-325 a year before I upgraded the motor and after a few weeks I removed it and went back to the stock setup because it had the same issues as the stock setup. Then Rikon came out with their upgrade kit (10-900) right as I had ordered the DVR motor from Striatech and I decided while I had the saw torn apart I would try that so I bought and installed that kit.

After a couple days work to completely clean the saw cabinet interior, install new tires, balance the wheels, and finely fit the guide bearing assemblies (because just like the stock Rikon setup and the Carter version they were not as good as they could be) and tweak other areas of the saw it performs flawlessly now. I want to improve dust collection and have a few ideas on that but they are down the road, maybe this Winter I will try a few mods out.
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It's a table saw, do you know where your fingers are?

Offline grbmds

  • Posts: 2061
Re: Blade for Resawing 8/4 x 10 Inch Cherry
« Reply #29 on: August 29, 2021, 10:41 AM »
Sorry, maybe I directed the response at the wrong person, but I thought you were the OP and were having some difficulty.

Actually the way I know that the Rikon 325 I own is setup correctly is the fact that following the Alex Snodgrass steps produces the consistent results I desire. So I guess, in the end, it's the results the tell me it's setup correctly for the saw. Since I have followed these steps, the results have always been what I want. First, the resawed slice is essentially consistent in thickness (not perfect, no, but consistent enough that running it through the planer smooth side down will always produce the desired thickness piece without taking very much off the rough resawed side.

You may do this already but my comment brings up another step when resawing. I make sure that I always put a jointed or planed side against the fence. Thus, the resulting slice will already have one flat smooth reference side. With a board that you are merely slicing in half, both sides should be flat and smooth to begin with so after resawing, you only need to flatten and smooth the cut side to thickness. As I said, you seem to know about resawing so I assume that this is part of your process.

I never got good results when I first got the Rikon saw and was disappointed because it replaced an old Craftsman which didn't make resawing easy no matter how I set it up. But, after a few setups using the the method from Alex, that all changed. Now, if I am not getting the desired results, I will check the setup and make corrections. If that doesn't work, then I change the blade.

Sorry I can't be of more help but, for me, following Alex's method for setup was the key and really the only factor in improving my results.
Randy