Author Topic: Best Tablesaw for Festoolians  (Read 98082 times)

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ericbuggeln

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Re: Best Tablesaw for Festoolians
« Reply #150 on: March 06, 2008, 03:40 PM »
Brice, I think Gary is the man and totally respect everything he has done for the advancement of the industry, especially safety.  I just got all of his videos for xmas.  I was just wondering if anyone knew something I didn't about why he would have had that set up.  I usually end up watching his videos when I can't fall asleep and maybe am wrong.  I probably was spying on something in the background that he wasn't even talking about, I do that to you also.  I will let you know next time I watch that video and see what context it is in.

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Offline Matthew Schenker

  • Posts: 2619
Re: Best Tablesaw for Festoolians
« Reply #151 on: March 06, 2008, 04:18 PM »
A featherboard after the cut?  Something seems wrong here.  So you would be pushing the offcut into the fence and squeezing the kerf shut?  What would be the benefit to that?
Matthew
FOG Designer and Creator

Offline graphex

  • Posts: 136
Re: Best Tablesaw for Festoolians
« Reply #152 on: March 06, 2008, 10:41 PM »
Graphex,  I dimensioned some scrap so that it fit into the metal section of the fence and then drove screws through the back into the auxiliary fence on the other side. The plastic pieces can only be taken off so many times before they begin to compromise the entire set up and make it very wobbly.

That is probably the way to go; I was hesitant to drill some scrap directly in to the fence, and I didn't see a clamping option for the 'fence lengthening piece' because the stock I was cutting was as tall as the fence so there wasn't really a place where a clamp would be out of the way. I'm thinking that some stock with a (Domino) mortise with a festool rail clamp in it might do the trick. I'm a bit leery about bending the fence though - it isn't terribly strong.

This was my first use of the saw, so hopefully some home made additions will improve my feelings towards it.

I will be getting the rousseau set up asap and will post comments and pics.  I currently only use this saw when I can't feasibly use TS75 on site, usually ripping long lengths of pre-primed trim for exterior.  One man feeds and another gently excepts.  Works with 16 footers.  No riving knife or splitter.

Looking forward to your impression of the rousseau. My friend and I were doing about the same thing ripping the maple, but I had the crappy guard and splitter on. I hate taking it off, especially when it is my first use of the tool and don't really know what to expect, but the anti-kickback pawls started grabbing the thin offcut and forcing it towards the back of the blade. Makes a horrible sound and I can't imagine it is at all safe. I really want to fashion a proper riving knife for this thing now.

 
Benchdog featherboards - 2 on top and one before blade.  ... My local woodcraft isn't carrying the Sawstop saw, so I can't find out if the riving knife could be fabricated to fit, although I still believe it could be by the looks of it, maybe check pic in posts above?

Yeah, featherboards would have helped significantly - they'll probably be my next purchase as I'll use them even if I get a rousseau table/fence.

I think the 745 will eventually be a useful tool for me, but you always want that first use to impress you with a new tool. With at least one featherboard and a longer fence, I'm sure I would have had a better first impression. It did get through the wood with no more trouble than the TS-75, which says it at least has good power.


Sean McKibben
Westminster, Colorado

we need more tools in north america

ericbuggeln

  • Guest
Re: Best Tablesaw for Festoolians
« Reply #153 on: March 07, 2008, 01:12 AM »
graphex, agree with everything you say.  I removed everything once I realized how dangerous it was.  Needless to say I was annoyed by the saw out of the box, but for some reason was not willing to give up.  The saw has power and weighs nothing and is easy to carry around.  The rousseau set up gives it everything it lacks, except for riving knife.  If I were you I would bend the prawls off the splitter and remove the guard.  I have since lost my splitter, but remember it being wider then the kerf.  You may want to try to alter that down with a grinder?  My finger is on the trigger for the rousseau

Offline graphex

  • Posts: 136
Re: Best Tablesaw for Festoolians
« Reply #154 on: March 07, 2008, 01:27 AM »
If I were you I would bend the prawls off the splitter and remove the guard.  I have since lost my splitter, but remember it being wider then the kerf.  You may want to try to alter that down with a grinder?  My finger is on the trigger for the rousseau

I got a 1/8" or so amana blade (haven't even spun the included blade) so the splitter is much smaller than the kerf. It is also wobbly and traps the offcut, so I think the thing is not meant to be used, and meant to merely comply with UL. Sucks when a safety device makes the thing less safe... I'd be happy to use a guard like that if it helped safety.

I will get a SawStop riving knife if they have any at Tool Zone tomorrow and see what I run in to. May be too much time in front of the Dremel to worry about, or perhaps too wide to fit in the slot that holds it in place. We'll have to see...


Sean McKibben
Westminster, Colorado

we need more tools in north america

Offline graphex

  • Posts: 136
Re: Best Tablesaw for Festoolians
« Reply #155 on: March 10, 2008, 03:20 AM »
OK, so couldn't find a riving knife replacement yet, but I did get a featherboard. Still hate this saw.

The featherboard I got (a Bench Dog) recommends it be set 2" from the beginning of the blade, and that the splitter part which locks it in the channel be towards the infeed side. Neither of those are possible with the tiny table - I had to have the featherboard hanging off the front of the table with the split side of the rail nearest the blade and it within 1/4" of the blade or it wouldn't even be in the channel!

Then I tried one rip (thankfully 1/16" wider than I needed it or I'd be eating maple!) and it did OK until the featherboard release point but had a 32nd-to-16th blade gouge in it the moment the featherboard released. There is just no way/nowhere to put pressure up against the fence. And it tossed the 1/4" offcut pretty roughly behind me. A better push stick may help here - I was using the included one. (I've got a better one on the way from woodpeckers)

I know I'm not the best in terms of technique here, but I'm trying my best with what I have. I'm sure that many people could get decent results ripping a 2.5x2.75x60" down to 2.5x2.5". Unfortunately, I'm getting more and more afraid using this $#%* thing and I'm worried that I'll sacrifice a finger before I get a good rip out of it.

After that bad experience with the first piece, I went back to my thickness planer and did several passes to bring my pieces down to the 2.5" width I wanted. They're a bit parallelogram, but at least I still have all my fingers!

If I had a Jointer, I could have done better, and if I'd had an MFT, I could have found a way to rip there too. The problem here it that the 745 just takes forever to eat through the wood, and so much pressure is necessary to feed while avoiding kickback, it just seems a horrible place to be, near this saw.

To its credit, I mitered some 1" thick pieces of pine with this saw and it did well. If I had the Rousseau table, I could mitre the 2.5^2x60 stock down to length, but that is pretty impossible with the tiny built in table.

I guess I'm hopeful that this saw will tide me over until Festool announces they're bringing the Precisio to the US. Then I'll be glad I didn't spend more on a table saw.
Sean McKibben
Westminster, Colorado

we need more tools in north america

Offline Matthew Schenker

  • Posts: 2619
Re: Best Tablesaw for Festoolians
« Reply #156 on: March 10, 2008, 08:25 AM »
...I will get a SawStop riving knife if they have any at Tool Zone tomorrow and see what I run in to. May be too much time in front of the Dremel to worry about, or perhaps too wide to fit in the slot that holds it in place. We'll have to see...

Please report back on what you do.  Maybe I'm wrong about this, but I'm very doubtful about getting a SawStop riving knife fitted onto your saw.

Not sure if this helps, but look here (DeWalt DW745):
4900-0

And here (SawStop):
4902-1

Matthew
« Last Edit: March 10, 2008, 08:28 AM by Matthew Schenker »
FOG Designer and Creator

ericbuggeln

  • Guest
Re: Best Tablesaw for Festoolians
« Reply #157 on: March 10, 2008, 02:06 PM »
graphex, everything i've heard says that dewalt shouldn't even be putting out that push stick b/c if you slip your hand is going right into the blade.  I have a gripper and i made one that looks like this http://www.woodcraft.com/family.aspx?FamilyID=5090.  As far as the featherboard you can't follow the directions and must attach so that it fits your situation.  I will be using this saw a bunch this next week at my humble shop and will be trying to figure some things out, i'll let you know.  What blade are you using, is the fence perfectly aligned?

matt, those are awesome pics for descriptive purposes.  Does the sawstop riving knife slip into the area above the brake and then get tightened?  That was my only thinking, that it might be able to be fabricated to fit into dewalts?  They don't have the sawstop at my local woodcraft.  Have you ever heard anything about MJ splitter

Offline Dovetail65

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Re: Best Tablesaw for Festoolians
« Reply #158 on: March 10, 2008, 02:32 PM »
I have used use the MJ splitter. The metal - dual version for a thin blade. It's a hassle to set up just right, but does work. It's no riving knife though.

If the lumber is thick and sits  a lot higher than the MJ there is still a chance the lumber can pinch above the height of the MJ if the wood twist from internal stresses, etc. So it is not fool proof by any means.
« Last Edit: March 10, 2008, 02:32 PM by nickao »
The one who says it can't be done should avoid interrupting the person doing it.

ericbuggeln

  • Guest
Re: Best Tablesaw for Festoolians
« Reply #159 on: March 10, 2008, 03:08 PM »
Thats pretty much what I thought heard, does anyone want to quit your day job and start an after market riving knife company?  Someone obviously has to do it.

Offline graphex

  • Posts: 136
Re: Best Tablesaw for Festoolians
« Reply #160 on: March 10, 2008, 03:37 PM »
Thats pretty much what I thought heard, does anyone want to quit your day job and start an after market riving knife company?  Someone obviously has to do it.

I'd do it but the moment I got something to market Festool would announce the availability of the Precisio in the US...

I do find it odd that we've heard almost no mention about that tool. If DeWalt can get the 745 through UL, I'm sure Festool can at least get a Precisio, if not the CMS. If they can't do the CMS saw insert for the TS-75/55, they should consider a UL approved table saw which fits the system. It would be much less dangerous than the 745 is!


Sean McKibben
Westminster, Colorado

we need more tools in north america

Offline alg

  • Posts: 81
Re: Best Tablesaw for Festoolians
« Reply #161 on: March 12, 2008, 03:42 AM »
hard to beat this excellent deal from Amazon for those of you still on the fence (pun intended):

Makita 2704X1 for $385.81 and free shipping!!!
http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/tg/detail/-/B000FVYA82/ref=ord_cart_shr?%5Fencoding=UTF8&m=ATVPDKIKX0DER&v=glance

I stayed up and ordered mine first. That will make a dent on my Kapex fund money.
Seattle, WA. USA.

Offline graphex

  • Posts: 136
Re: Best Tablesaw for Festoolians
« Reply #162 on: March 20, 2008, 08:38 PM »
Looks like SawStop has officially announced their contractor saw. Looks like an extremely good saw, and $1500 is a decent price. I may have to choose between this and the Kapex...

Here is a link to the fine woodworking review
Here is the page on the SawStop site

I want to see how easy it is to remove the wings and such for storing, as I need to be able to break down my shop to transform back to its 2 car garage day job.

Sean McKibben
Westminster, Colorado

we need more tools in north america

Offline mohrab

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Re: Best Tablesaw for Festoolians
« Reply #163 on: March 23, 2008, 09:59 PM »
I have been building some child's furniture and have found that I primarily use my table saw to rip.  I find the set up time using the Festool table and saw is too time consuming unless I am missing something?  I also have been considering buying a Bosch for the convenience of putting it away when not using it.
My other option is the Woodtek Left-tilt hybrid.  With the enclosed wheels it could easly moved out of the way when not in use.  I think the table top would and fence would be more precise and functional than the Bosch?

Offline alg

  • Posts: 81
Re: Best Tablesaw for Festoolians
« Reply #164 on: March 23, 2008, 11:50 PM »
The Makita 2704X1 fits nicely underneath my MFT1080. The stand uses hydraulics to lower-raise. When lowered, it is much lower than the Bosch with its gravity stand.
I had the Bosch briefly as a Christmas gift, the Makita 2704X1 is a better deal especially if you pick it up for $385 from Amazon.
Seattle, WA. USA.

Re: Best Tablesaw for Festoolians
« Reply #165 on: March 26, 2008, 03:25 PM »
I have the Precisio CS50 but honestly it does not see as much use as I'd wish for. But the saw is not at fault, it is just that the stuff I mostly do is hardcore ripping and fast profiling of wood, for which I use the Makita 2704 at work. It rips like a bear and has enough precision for finer work as well. The CS50 is at home and tucks away nicely but if I ever get more space for my own little shop I am thinking of either adding the 2704 or switching the CS50 for the 2704. The CS70 is too expensive for what you get and the CS50 has great precision but lacks a little oomph when it comes to ripping down bigger stock.

As long as I have access to the 2704 I feel no need for the CS50 and for the smaller work I have Mitre saws and the TS55 for longer cuts. But the 2704 would only come thru the door over my gf's dead body.  ;)
Festool:  CS 50EB precisio set, Domino DF500, DF XL 700, OFK500 edge router, OF1010 router EHL65 planer, CTL Mini/Midi Vac, CTL 26 vac MFT800+1080 tables
DSC-AG Grinder,  RAS 115
Rotex 150, ETS EC 150/5 RTS400
Drills: T18, BHC18, CXS.
SysLite KAL II, SYS Rock.
Sys- and Sortainers galore.

Line up has been reduced with the introduction of Mafell/Metabo tools. Red Green and Blue do mix well in the shop.

Offline Matthew Schenker

  • Posts: 2619
Re: Best Tablesaw for Festoolians
« Reply #166 on: March 26, 2008, 03:31 PM »
...matt, those are awesome pics for descriptive purposes.  Does the sawstop riving knife slip into the area above the brake and then get tightened?  That was my only thinking, that it might be able to be fabricated to fit into dewalts?  They don't have the sawstop at my local woodcraft.  Have you ever heard anything about MJ splitter

I have no absolute proof, but I'm going to say that you will not be able to fit a SawStop riving knife onto a DeWalt saw without a lot of engineering!  The fitting for each of those knives is different, and what it seats into in the blade mechanism is different.  I'm not even sure it would be a good idea to re-engineer a SawStop knife for a DeWalt.  Then again, I've often been pleasantly surprised at what people can do, so if someone has a way, by all means...

But while you're at it (whoever you are), figure out a way to re-design a Ridgid benchtop blade mechanism so it accepts a riving knife and moves up and down with the blade!

Matthew
« Last Edit: March 26, 2008, 03:32 PM by Matthew Schenker »
FOG Designer and Creator

Offline Eli

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Re: Best Tablesaw for Festoolians
« Reply #167 on: March 26, 2008, 04:45 PM »
As long as I have access to the 2704 I feel no need for the CS50 and for the smaller work I have Mitre saws and the TS55 for longer cuts. But the 2704 would only come thru the door over my gf's dead body.  ;)

Make sure not to leave her where she'll trip you while you've got a saw in your hands. It'd be a shame to scratch a new tool by dropping it.  :o :o :o
Do nothing, stay ahead.

Re: Best Tablesaw for Festoolians
« Reply #168 on: March 28, 2008, 05:19 PM »
...or if she would "accidentally trip" across the Makita while in ripmode.  :o

R.I.P.

(rest in pieces)  ;)

Festool:  CS 50EB precisio set, Domino DF500, DF XL 700, OFK500 edge router, OF1010 router EHL65 planer, CTL Mini/Midi Vac, CTL 26 vac MFT800+1080 tables
DSC-AG Grinder,  RAS 115
Rotex 150, ETS EC 150/5 RTS400
Drills: T18, BHC18, CXS.
SysLite KAL II, SYS Rock.
Sys- and Sortainers galore.

Line up has been reduced with the introduction of Mafell/Metabo tools. Red Green and Blue do mix well in the shop.

Offline poto

  • Posts: 408
Re: Best Tablesaw for Festoolians
« Reply #169 on: March 29, 2008, 01:09 AM »
And here I thought "gf" was "grandfather". Probably says something about me, but I don't know what...

Offline Cannuck

  • Posts: 118
Re: Best Tablesaw for Festoolians
« Reply #170 on: March 31, 2008, 03:19 PM »
I have to say that before I stumbled upon Festool I had been a big fan of the Bosch products (and still am!).  I have the Bosch 4100 table saw with Gravity-rise stand, and I have to say it has served me extremely well on jobsites renovating turn-of-the-century, Victorian Homes.  It handles just about everything I've thrown at it, from ripping dimensional lumber to match 100-year old 2x dimensions, and building custom cabinetry.  I also have the Bosch 4210 mitre saw (with upfront controls), and I find that the german-engineered Bosch products compliment the Festool products I have.

I was building a "panelled" window seat for a 45-degree bay window this week, and found myself using the combination of tools in a very convenient and efficient manner - including my 4100 tablesaw, 4210 sliding compound mitre saw, Festool Domino, and my brand new (virgin) Festool TS75 and MFT1080.  While the dust collection on the Festool system is unparalleled, ripping and cross-cutting the rails and stiles for the panels was much easier with the table saw and mitre saw.  Cutting the seat top and the panel inserts however were unbelievably easy and precise with the TS 75 and MFT.  The Festool products have added an effortless precision to my work, but I don't see myself replacing all my Bosch tools.

I will say though, I'm a Festool junkie now!  I just added the OF1400 router to my arsenal (on top of PC and two Bosch colts).  I can't say enough about the dust collection.  Its saving my lungs (and my marriage!).

Hindsight is like foresight, but with no future.

Offline Loren Woirhaye

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Re: Best Tablesaw for Festoolians - old iron.
« Reply #171 on: April 08, 2008, 06:16 PM »
Ok, I know some of you guys must be in Northern California and would love
to own one of these.  Its too far for me to go but if I was within 2 hours
of Davis, CA I would try to snap it up.

Its a Hammond Glider -  a printer's Linotype saw with a crazy-accurate 
sliding table and ACME lead screw indexed cross-cutting fence.

I actually own a less-fancy, though in better condition, printer's saw
by another maker and it is super cool and dead-accurate for joinery.

Anyhow- this Hammond Trim-o-saw is in Davis California and its on
Ebay.  Its kind of rough, looks like its been left outside and it
might need a new motor - but don't let that hold you back.  A
little elbow greese and you will have the ultimate specialized joinery
saw.  These things have a cult following among crazy furniture
making fanatics and probably guitar-builders too.   Just do a little
poking around and you'll find information about that.  There are
several nice examples on OWWM.com

Here's the URL - ends tomorrow.

http://search.ebay.com/_W0QQsassZstevenschwartz8xs9

ericbuggeln

  • Guest
Re: Best Tablesaw for Festoolians
« Reply #172 on: June 09, 2008, 12:01 AM »
These are some pics of the Rousseau Table Saw Stand with outfeed table on a DW 745.  Long ago it seemed that some might be interested in a contractor style saw if they didn't have such pathetic fences and complete lack of outfeed support.  I have had this for awhile and am very pleased with it.  Very well put together and I feel confident that it will hold up better then anything that I've seen.  It's easy to set up and break down and is extremely compact when ready to store.  This set up costs about $100.00 more then the saw itself, not including Forrest blade, and other accessories, but I think I have finally found a set up that really compliments the TS-75 well for my at work by day and in garage by night and weekend style.  I am considering putting a router plate in the side table and using a cap of sorts for when not in use.  The fence and outfeed can be switched to the other side for use when routing.  Dust collection is obviously improved when hooked up to ct 22 with D50, but I am currently experimenting with sealing off areas of the saw to cut down on the mess.  Anyone know why contractor table saws always have open base as opposed to cabinet style saws?  Better yet does anyone think it's a bad idea to seal it up?

« Last Edit: June 09, 2008, 12:04 AM by ericbuggeln »

Offline Eli

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Re: Best Tablesaw for Festoolians
« Reply #173 on: June 09, 2008, 02:33 AM »
I think they're open based because they're cheaper to make that way, and it used to not matter so much about dust......
Do nothing, stay ahead.

ericbuggeln

  • Guest
Re: Best Tablesaw for Festoolians
« Reply #174 on: June 09, 2008, 08:25 AM »
Eli, I appreciate the Rousseau endorsement you gave me long ago.  This particular model DW 745 appears that they attempted to put the least amount of plastic they could on it, but roll cage much like there radios is strong and easy to hold on to.  The Dust cutter bag never seems to be full.  The majority of dust/shrapnel ends up in front of the user?  I'm not sure if I can do anything about that?

Offline Dave Rudy

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  • Coloroda Front Range, in the lee of Pikes Peak
Re: Best Tablesaw for Festoolians
« Reply #175 on: June 09, 2008, 08:55 PM »
Thats pretty much what I thought heard, does anyone want to quit your day job and start an after market riving knife company?  Someone obviously has to do it.

Eric, this is an old post but I just saw it (now that I've learned how to go through unread posts!)  Try this website:  http://www.leestyron.com/

ericbuggeln

  • Guest
Re: Best Tablesaw for Festoolians
« Reply #176 on: June 09, 2008, 11:12 PM »
Dave, good looking out on that, I appreciate it and gave Lee an email.  He seems like a good ole boy who knows his after market accessories.  Money back if it doesn't work, I think I can live with that.   It looks like his Shark Guard would work well with D50, but I showed control and refused to look at price.  Bad economy and all.  Riving knife was $60.00, sound reasonable.  Thanks Eric

ericbuggeln

  • Guest
Re: Best Tablesaw for Festoolians
« Reply #177 on: June 10, 2008, 09:55 PM »
Riving knife is only $28.00 shipped anywhere in U.S. on Lee Styron's site.  Very reasonably priced and some really cool stuff.

Offline bonesbr549

  • Posts: 543
  • I'd rather be woodworking
Re: Best Tablesaw for Festoolians
« Reply #178 on: July 30, 2008, 03:29 PM »
Over the last year, I've noticed many "discussions" (i.e., arguments) about tablesaws in other woodworking forums.    In most woodworking forums, the tablesaw is the most fundamental of all woodworking tools.   I.e., you can NOT do woodworking without a table saw.  Just ask any "true" woodworker!  ::)  OTOH...

Many Festoolians (including me) don't even own one.  Most cuts that woodworkers do on a table saw can easily be done with some pink foam or an MFT plus a Festool rail plus a TS55.  No problem!  Well, almost...   

Many Festoolians will still admit that for small, repeated cuts, a tablesaw is the best tool.    Then, a few weeks ago, Matthew made an interesting post about his interest in a contractor saw.   

This got me thinking, "IF you had a TS55 + rails + MFT or pink foam so you could take care of the big stuff or break down sheet goods, what kind of tablesaw would you buy?  cabinet saw?  Maybe a contractor saw?  Something else? 

I'd like to hear from you.  what is your opinion?  What would you recommend (or buy)?

Regards,

Dan.

I've got to say I agree with others in that the TS in my shop is critical and the tool I use the most.  I've had all different kinds from table top models (first one) to hybrids to the old shopsmith all in one to today's cabinet saw.  Of all I've used the cabinet saw is the best.  It's beef and stability and fence are incredible.  I have the grizzly 1023slx with 7' rails.  It's great and was very economical ($1100). I've had it for 4-5 years now and it's never missed a beat paired with the incra 1000se miter gauge.  That would not be the best choice if I need to transport the thing to a job site or something but I'm a hobbyist.  I can also provide 220 power.  I've looked at the t55 and when cutting small stock, I just can see how the t55 would be practical IMO.  All the above I mentioned can cut a strait line and cross cut but some just easier that others and for my needs the Cab saw is best.  I have a long clamp strait edge and the PC sawboss with a forrest wwII in it for cutting sheet goods or putting a strait line rip edge on a rough board, and I'd love to replace that with the t55, but in my book you just can't beat the beef of a good cabinet saw.  That's M2CW

Re: Best Tablesaw for Festoolians
« Reply #179 on: August 06, 2008, 12:47 PM »
After a few rounds of trial and error I figured I did need a Table Saw, I just could not figure out which one.

The Makita 2704 we have in shop, it does a good job. To big to haul around though the 93mm of rip capacity is hard to beat. (Our raw stock is usually a 90x90x1200mm block for window details).

The CS50 I have owned, great saw, lightweight and small. On the odd occasion the 50mm rip capacity was not enough though the precision was superb. It got stolen on a job site and I was not sure if I would replace it with the same one.

The CS70EB was too heavy though the footprint was reasonable, as was the rip capacity.

I did not even consider the CMS with the TS75 until I noticed it has the same size baseplate as the TS55 module. The catalogue price was a bit steep so I was going to drop the idea of getting one but the Festool Rep I have done some work for gave me such a sweet deal I didn't have to think twice. (Cannot disclose the price but it was really good  ;D). The tablesaw is only slightly heavier than the CMS/TS55 combo and in kilograms it weighs in at 17.5kg. I got the side extension for it and the LA492095 rip fence and I was set for sure. It has done a great job so far and the dust extraction is really good.

And I actually got to use the TS75 on the rails as I was cutting and ripping a 40mm thick oak bench top and the TS55 was choking slightly on it I slipped the TS75 on the rails and it just zipped through it in good style. Then it was attached to the CMS module and I hope I don't have to take it out of there, it is a bit cumbersome and not as fast as I would hope.

Very pleased with the CMS/TS75 combo though. 
Festool:  CS 50EB precisio set, Domino DF500, DF XL 700, OFK500 edge router, OF1010 router EHL65 planer, CTL Mini/Midi Vac, CTL 26 vac MFT800+1080 tables
DSC-AG Grinder,  RAS 115
Rotex 150, ETS EC 150/5 RTS400
Drills: T18, BHC18, CXS.
SysLite KAL II, SYS Rock.
Sys- and Sortainers galore.

Line up has been reduced with the introduction of Mafell/Metabo tools. Red Green and Blue do mix well in the shop.