Author Topic: Beam saw suggestions  (Read 1289 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline ear3

  • Posts: 3886
Beam saw suggestions
« on: October 12, 2019, 07:36 AM »
I'm working on a table commission that involves large, oval-shaped legs (4" x 5 1/2") similar to these:





I don't currently have a tool that would cross cut something that thick to length, so I'm thinking I'll take this opportunity to invest in a beam saw (unless there are other suggestions for how to cut something like this accurately). 

I'm not going Mafell, so it looks like the two main options are the Makita 5402 and the Skilsaw Super Sawsquatch.  It seems that both are comparable in power, so my main need is accuracy and as dead square a cut as can be achieved with a tool like this.

Other than this project, down the road I do have a deck build where this saw would presumably get used to cut 4x4s and 6x6s to length.

There's an online head to head review that seems to favor the Skilsaw, so I am currently leaning in this direction:



Anyone have experience with these saws and/or a marked preference?
Kapex KS 120 w/UG Cart and Extensions • CXS Set • T18+3 w/Centrotec Installer's Set • PDC 18/4 • TS 75 • TSC 55 • HKC 55 w/250, 420 and 670 FSK rails • Carvex 420 w/Accessory Kit • Domino 500 Set • Domino 700 XL • OF 2200 w/Base Accessory Kit • OF 1400 • OF 1010 • MFK 700 EQ Set • LR 32 • MFS 400 w/2000, 1000, and 700 extensions • Rotex 90 • Rotex 150 • LS 130 • ETS-EC 150/5 • ETS-EC 150/3 • Pro 5 LTD • RTS 400 • RAS 115.04 • RS 2 • HL 850 • Vecturo OS 400 • CT 26 w/BT module • CT Sys w/Long-Life Bag • MFT/3

Festool USA does not pre-approve the contents of this website nor endorse the application or use of any Festool product in any way other than in the manner described in the Festool Instruction Manual. To reduce the risk of serious injury and/or damage to your Festool product, always read, understand and follow all warnings and instructions in your Festool product's Instruction Manual. Although Festool strives for accuracy in the website material, the website may contain inaccuracies. Festool makes no representations about the accuracy, reliability, completeness or timeliness of the material on this website or about the results to be obtained from using the website. Festool and its affiliates cannot be responsible for improper postings or your reliance on the website's material. Your use of any material contained on this website is entirely at your own risk. The content contained on this site is provided for informational purposes only and does not constitute professional advice.


Offline demographic

  • Posts: 548
Re: Beam saw suggestions
« Reply #1 on: October 12, 2019, 08:35 AM »
I've used a HKC55 to accurately cut oak beams 100x220, just do a 50mm deep cut on one side, cut along one edge and flip it over and do the other side.

Unless you desperately just want to buy a beam saw or have a few hundred legs to cut it seems kind of overkill for just a few tables.
« Last Edit: October 12, 2019, 12:29 PM by demographic »

Offline TSO Products

  • Retailer
  • *
  • Posts: 853
    • TSO Products
Re: Beam saw suggestions
« Reply #2 on: October 12, 2019, 09:39 AM »
Have you considered a millwork shop who already has the capability and farm out this uncommon requirement?

Hans
TSOproducts.com

Home of the GRS-16 and GRS-16 PE  plus TPG Parallel Guide -  the MTR-18 Triangle - TDS-10 Dog Stop and GRC-12 Guide Rail Connector; Work Holding solutions plus AXMINSTER UJK in the USA

Offline Michael Kellough

  • Posts: 4309
Re: Beam saw suggestions
« Reply #3 on: October 12, 2019, 10:04 AM »
I’d go with the Skillsaw because of the better base. Big saws like these seldom have really flat bases and if it doesn’t you won’t get a truly square cut. Even if the base is flat the bevel adjustment on these big rough carpentry saws is pretty crude and again, the base is rather flimsy and can twist simply from the weight of the saw.

I’d do as Demographic suggested after getting the stock nicely prepped, square/straight/parallel. At that point sawing from all four sides with a more civilized saw should work well. Better than one risky cut with a wonky saw.

Otherwise, you would likely get better results from a handsaw than a beamsaw.

Offline rst

  • Posts: 2277
Re: Beam saw suggestions
« Reply #4 on: October 12, 2019, 10:31 AM »
A judicious use of a handsaw would definitely be the most cost effective solution, finishing with a hand plane to ensure square.

Offline Alex

  • Posts: 6189
Re: Beam saw suggestions
« Reply #5 on: October 12, 2019, 11:02 AM »
Handsaw was the first thing that came to mind seeing this post. Not that I want to stop you from buying a powertool, but unless you do these things very often it is a costly and space consuming option.

Online Peter Halle

  • Global Moderator
  • *
  • Posts: 12082
  • Magnum - My new little boy
Re: Beam saw suggestions
« Reply #6 on: October 12, 2019, 11:16 AM »
A mitersaw of any brand using a fence with stops would get you most of the way thru of thru using the flipping method.  If needed a hand say would finish up.  Maybe a low angle plane to finish up but you have shown outstanding skills here and this is definitely in your wheelhouse.

Peter

Offline Bob D.

  • Posts: 1382
Re: Beam saw suggestions
« Reply #7 on: October 12, 2019, 12:59 PM »
I believe Milwaukee just came out with a cordless version.
I seem to remember getting an email from them not long ago announcing it.
-----
It's a table saw, do you know where your fingers are?

Offline Michael Kellough

  • Posts: 4309
Re: Beam saw suggestions
« Reply #8 on: October 12, 2019, 01:19 PM »
A mitersaw of any brand using a fence with stops would get you most of the way thru of thru using the flipping method.  If needed a hand say would finish up.  Maybe a low angle plane to finish up but you have shown outstanding skills here and this is definitely in your wheelhouse.
Peter

This is OT but a little relevant.

I’ve been using the Mafell KSS 40 (very similar but smaller and a little more refined than the Festool HKC 55) and enjoying the ability to take the saw to the work. Especially convenient when the work is heavy or awkward. Way easier than tugging the wood back and forth to suit a miter saw.

Another benefit (also similar to the HK saws) is that it’s actually easier to make very fine angle adjustments than with a miter saw simply because the space between whole degree increments on the scale is about double that on a miter saw angle scale.

Offline Svar

  • Posts: 1904
Re: Beam saw suggestions
« Reply #9 on: October 12, 2019, 01:50 PM »
You already have TS75, HK55, or Kapex. Cut as deep as it goes to establish square kerf and finish with hand saw.
« Last Edit: October 12, 2019, 02:42 PM by Svar »

Offline Bob D.

  • Posts: 1382
Re: Beam saw suggestions
« Reply #10 on: October 12, 2019, 08:24 PM »
I believe Milwaukee just came out with a cordless version.
I seem to remember getting an email from them not long ago announcing it.

I was mistaken, I thought it was Milwaukee but it was Skilsaw that came out with a beam saw recently.



Looks like ToolNut has them.

https://www.toolnut.com/power-tools/saws/band-saws/skilsaw-spt55-11-worm-drive-carpentry-16-chainsaw.html
« Last Edit: October 12, 2019, 08:31 PM by Bob D. »
-----
It's a table saw, do you know where your fingers are?

Offline DeformedTree

  • Posts: 618
Re: Beam saw suggestions
« Reply #11 on: October 12, 2019, 11:24 PM »
handsaw to get it rough, then rig up a routing plate or similar fixture to finish machine the end off with a router.

Online Cheese

  • Posts: 6612
Re: Beam saw suggestions
« Reply #12 on: October 13, 2019, 01:24 AM »
I'd check in with your local lumber yards or Home Depot. I know of a half-dozen of them locally that have functioning 14"-16" radial arm saws and they may help you out for a small stipend.

If that's not an option, then I'd go the TS 75 track saw method and cut-rotate and cut again.
« Last Edit: October 13, 2019, 10:26 AM by Cheese »

Online Tinker

  • Posts: 3721
Re: Beam saw suggestions
« Reply #13 on: October 13, 2019, 06:07 AM »
@ear3 As I recall, a while back you were actually getting into serious use of hand tools. They still do make hand saws. Hand planes to fine tune. I go along with those suggestions.
Tinker
Wayne H. Tinker

Offline kcufstoidi

  • Posts: 847
Re: Beam saw suggestions
« Reply #14 on: October 13, 2019, 07:14 AM »
Both those saws are weapons but could be rented from a good Rental Supply. The blade is the important, expensive part. Have you considered using a good bandsaw or a 14" Makita compound mitersaw. When I was a landscape contractor, in a previous life, we very accurately cut thousands of 6x6 cedar and pressure treated timbers with the 14" mitersaw for decks and retaining walls.

Offline RJNeal

  • Posts: 405
Re: Beam saw suggestions
« Reply #15 on: October 13, 2019, 07:30 AM »
I’m in the use the Hkc and hand saw camp.
I also own a 10” skilsaw but with Hkc and track you should be able to connect the perimeter kerfs nicely.
I’m not in the position to store a lot of tools that don’t get used much.
And yes I wouldn’t mine owning a 16”
Rick.
Have you walked your saw today?

Offline Master Carpenter

  • Posts: 110
Re: Beam saw suggestions
« Reply #16 on: October 13, 2019, 08:14 AM »
Your asking to use a timber framing saw for fine furniture. I wouldn’t. Look at the tooth count of the available blades. You’ll definitely get tearout at the cutline, taping it will be necessary.

I have experience with the Makita, it’s a two hand saw, it’s nicknamed the Man-kita around here. Getting perfectly accurate crosscuts is going to take some practice.

Like others have mentioned, I’d use a saw I already have and finish with a handsaw. Probably be done in less time than driving to the store and back to buy the bigger saw. If you want precision build a fence and clamp/screw the tracksaw at 90 degrees making a giant miterbox. Plunge and go with the TS75. A stop block on the other side wil guarantee they are all the exact same length.


Offline Sourwould

  • Posts: 71
Re: Beam saw suggestions
« Reply #17 on: October 17, 2019, 07:43 PM »
You shouldn't have a problem cutting this with a regular skilsaw in two passes.

I have used the old gold makitas, newer makitas and the big worm drives. The old gold makitas are the nicest of the three. All cut pretty rough, pretty slow, and are hard to keep true. Cuts have to start perfectly straight (if you're freehanding), you will not steer one of these saws in the cut. I think it's best to use a guide or do a scoring cut, helps with tear out too.