Author Topic: Worksharp Sharpening Station  (Read 25387 times)

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Offline danjames

  • Posts: 55
Worksharp Sharpening Station
« on: February 21, 2010, 03:37 AM »
Hi Everyone, 

I've been looking into getting a new sharpening system for my hand tools, at the moment I just use a bench grinder which is ok but I would like something different.

The Worksharp system appeals to me as it sharpens tools without water, looks portable and can give a fine edge to tools.

I have a few questions to ask if anyone has any experience with this tool -

Is it as good as they say, I have not seen or used one here in Italy yet. 

Can it give a truly sharp and polished edge.

How long do the abrasives last for and are they value for money.

Any feedback is greatly appreciated - thanks in advance.

Dan James.

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Offline Peter Halle

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Re: Worksharp Sharpening Station
« Reply #1 on: February 21, 2010, 07:30 AM »
Dan,

Buy it.

That tool is one of the tools that I have never regretted buying.  I have only used it for straight chisels.  No gouges, turning tools, etc.  There was a thread here not too long ago about what tools were keepers and it made that list consistently from many members.

I am not a fan of spending hours sharpening, so I appreciate the fact that it is quick.  I also got a far superior sharpening than I have ever achieved by another method.  When I got mine, I gathered up all my chisels - 25 or more - that were in bad shape and went to town.  At the end of maybe 2 hours I was ecstatic.

As to the length of abrasive life, I can't answer that for you - I haven't used any up. 

Don't worry others will chime in for sure.  I'll go looking for a couple of links for you.

Peter

Offline Dan Rush

  • Posts: 608
  • Trim carpenter
Re: Worksharp Sharpening Station
« Reply #2 on: February 21, 2010, 08:25 AM »
Dan,

I have to echo Peter's advice.  It's a great little machine.  I use my chisels/planes in the field, and always find a way to nick them up.  I have never really mastered sharpening blades, and working on them was a chore, so I rarely had nice sharp tools with me when needed.  With the worksharp, I'm always ready to go.  I can usually tune up my 6-8 blades in 10-15 minuets, max.

I think the abrasives are a bit pricey, but good quality.  I use generic 6" sticky disks for the lower grits, then switch to better quality disks in the higher grits.  seems to work ok.

Dan

Offline Peter Halle

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Re: Worksharp Sharpening Station
« Reply #3 on: February 21, 2010, 08:29 AM »
Here is a thread started by Jerry Work:     Worksharp

Here is the manual / review he did for the WorkSharp:  Manual / Review of Worksharp

Peter
« Last Edit: February 21, 2010, 08:32 AM by Peter Halle »

Offline JJ Wavra

  • Posts: 256
Re: Worksharp Sharpening Station
« Reply #4 on: February 21, 2010, 09:05 AM »
I have the work sharp and love it.  I have sharpened everything I own on it from chisels, plane blades, carving tools, and I did sharpen some turning tools on it.  I have the wide blade attachment on it for plane blades and it works great.  I have worn out paper but it does take a while.  I will admit that sharpening turning tools, while it I was able to do it,  I prefer the speed from a grinder and the hollow grind.  I then follow up using the Koch system for most things after the work sharp that system is great.  I Purchased the wheel separately and mounted it to a 1750 rpm motor and love it to death.

JJ

Offline bruegf

  • Posts: 814
  • Michigan
Re: Worksharp Sharpening Station
« Reply #5 on: February 21, 2010, 09:37 AM »
Dan,

Buy it!!   Until I bought the worksharp 3000 I was far more likely to make my chisels duller than sharper.   I'd get them sharp eventually but could easily waste an hour to sharpen one chisel.  Just have never picked up the ability to sharpen anything with a stone.

Now I can sharpen a chisel in 2 or 3 minutes, less for just a quick touch-up and end up with a chisel that's sharp enough to shave with.

I've not worn out any paper yet, but I don't do enough work w/ chisels that I have to sharpen that often.

I can say enough good things about this tool.

Fred
Fred

Offline Jesse Cloud

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  • Festooling at the end of a dirt road in New Mexico
Re: Worksharp Sharpening Station
« Reply #6 on: February 21, 2010, 10:35 AM »
I think its worth the money.  It will produce a pretty sharp chisel with a minimum of time and effort.  For very demanding applications such as dovetails, I will move on to waterstones from the worksharp, but for utility chisels, it is the cats meow!

Offline clintholeman

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Re: Worksharp Sharpening Station
« Reply #7 on: February 21, 2010, 11:50 AM »
I feel the need to chime in with everyone else.  It is one of those purchases, like FesTools, that meet or exceed one's expectations.  I use it for chisels and turning tools.  It has made keeping sharp turning tools a breeze and I don't worry about "bluing" a gouge. 

It is most definitely a "buy"!
Clint Holeman

clint@clintholeman.com
http://www.clintholeman.com

Offline danjames

  • Posts: 55
Re: Worksharp Sharpening Station
« Reply #8 on: February 21, 2010, 12:32 PM »
Thank you very much for all your replies, really good feedback.

Looks like I'm going to be buying myself a Toolsharp system.

Many thanks - Dan James.

Offline mhoy

  • Posts: 111
Re: Worksharp Sharpening Station
« Reply #9 on: February 21, 2010, 02:27 PM »
Recently saw a discount on this at the SawMillCreek Forum too!

Mark
TS 55 EQ, RO 150, CT 22, CDD 12, DF 500Q, OF 1400, MFT/3, RS400E
Elektra T1

Offline waynew

  • Posts: 69
Re: Worksharp Sharpening Station
« Reply #10 on: February 21, 2010, 07:12 PM »
I purchased a Worksharp 3000 along with all of the accesories and ended up selling because it wasn't near as good as the Veritas MkII honing guide. The MkII is just so much more precise and there is no mucking around with all those parts. After sharpening my wide plane blades on the small round plate of the Worksharp and the long flat surface of a water stone there is no returning the Worksharp.
So I went from Veritas sharpening system (4 years) to Worksharp (3 Months)  to the Veritas MkII and have found this to be the perfect blend of flexibilty, control and accuracy for my requirements.

Good luck.
Festools - the tools that make you feel like working!

Offline john stevens

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  • Ardmore, PA
Re: Worksharp Sharpening Station
« Reply #11 on: February 21, 2010, 09:10 PM »
So I went from Veritas sharpening system (4 years) to Worksharp (3 Months)  to the Veritas MkII

Hi, Wayne.  Does the MkII work with short-bladed chisels?  I've got a set of Japanese chisels that don't work with the old Veritas system.

Regards,

John
What this world needs is a good retreat.
--Captain Beefheart

Offline danjames

  • Posts: 55
Re: Worksharp Sharpening Station
« Reply #12 on: February 22, 2010, 02:16 AM »
I purchased a Worksharp 3000 along with all of the accesories and ended up selling because it wasn't near as good as the Veritas MkII honing guide. The MkII is just so much more precise and there is no mucking around with all those parts. After sharpening my wide plane blades on the small round plate of the Worksharp and the long flat surface of a water stone there is no returning the Worksharp.
So I went from Veritas sharpening system (4 years) to Worksharp (3 Months)  to the Veritas MkII and have found this to be the perfect blend of flexibilty, control and accuracy for my requirements.

Good luck.

Waynew,

I use the veritas mark 1 system at the moment it's ok but not so easy to set up really accuratley time after time, I also use water stones.

Maybe I shall need to use a combination of both, chisels in the worksharp and my stones and guide for my plane blades.

I like the idea of the worksharp because you can do a quick touch up without having to set up the guide and also without getting dirty fingers from the slurry created with the water that is used.

Many thanks - Dan James.

Offline Bu Woodworking

  • Posts: 53
Re: Worksharp Sharpening Station
« Reply #13 on: February 22, 2010, 09:40 AM »
Hey, John...we're almost neighbors (I live in Philadelphia, near 22nd and South St)

Yes, the Veritas MK II guide can work with Japanese blades & chisels.  The blade bottom is clamped against the jig, which was not the case with the MK I guide.

The registration jig part of the MK II is a huge improvement over the MK I; all things being equal, one can quickly set a blade in the jig at a given angle and square to the jig.  With my square blades (Lie Nielsen, Veritas, et cetera), I still check the set up with a small square.  My Japanese blades, blacksmithed by a guy, one at a time..aren't necessarily the same width, front to back.

In these situations...I can...

1.  Not worry about it...most of the time, a chisel bevel edge two or three degrees out of square doesn't matter.

2.  "Joint" the blade side on a diamond stone, so it orients square in the registration jig.

3.  Set up the blade in the registration jig, compensating for taper.

4.  Sharpen freehand.

I probably choose #1 or #4 most of the time, but that's just me.

As I said in an older thread about hand planes, the MK II is worth the money. 

Offline chelseaboy

  • Posts: 49
Re: Worksharp Sharpening Station
« Reply #14 on: April 28, 2010, 12:39 PM »
Buy it,

I have the smaller Tool Sharpener ws200 from worksharp,
and use it out on site.

Fantastic bit of kit, you wont regret buying it  ;)

Offline suds

  • Posts: 414
Re: Worksharp Sharpening Station
« Reply #15 on: May 04, 2010, 10:14 PM »
Is there  a setup to sharpen regular kitchen knives?
MFT's, Kapex, TS 55, Vac, 150 Rotrex, 300 Trion, Domino

Offline quietguy

  • Posts: 491
Re: Worksharp Sharpening Station
« Reply #16 on: May 04, 2010, 10:44 PM »
Quote
Is there  a setup to sharpen regular kitchen knives?

I think the WS2000 has an accessory to sharpen knife blades, but not the WS3000. 

Offline suds

  • Posts: 414
Re: Worksharp Sharpening Station
« Reply #17 on: May 05, 2010, 12:09 AM »
I think I saw a demo video on the WS2000 and that's where I came up with the question for the 3000.  Strange they'd have it for the 2000 and not the 3000
MFT's, Kapex, TS 55, Vac, 150 Rotrex, 300 Trion, Domino

Offline dharmon

  • Posts: 16
Re: Worksharp Sharpening Station
« Reply #18 on: May 05, 2010, 08:17 PM »
I have the WorkSharp 3000, but for knives, I prefer this instead (although I don't have the attachment): 
Chef's Choice Knife Sharpener

It works very fast, and puts a nice edge on my Wustofs!

Offline GhostFist

  • Posts: 1551
Re: Worksharp Sharpening Station
« Reply #19 on: October 09, 2010, 09:40 AM »
 I like the speed of the worksharp for chisels but i like to give a final honing with the MK 2 on a waterstone. The worksharp will get your blades pretty darn sharp, I'm just a bit obsessive. Saves a huge ammount of time though with jobsite chisels so i recommend!

Offline grbmds

  • Posts: 2085
Re: Worksharp Sharpening Station
« Reply #20 on: December 07, 2015, 12:14 PM »
Dan,

Buy it.

That tool is one of the tools that I have never regretted buying.  I have only used it for straight chisels.  No gouges, turning tools, etc.  There was a thread here not too long ago about what tools were keepers and it made that list consistently from many members.

I am not a fan of spending hours sharpening, so I appreciate the fact that it is quick.  I also got a far superior sharpening than I have ever achieved by another method.  When I got mine, I gathered up all my chisels - 25 or more - that were in bad shape and went to town.  At the end of maybe 2 hours I was ecstatic.

As to the length of abrasive life, I can't answer that for you - I haven't used any up. 

Don't worry others will chime in for sure.  I'll go looking for a couple of links for you.

Peter
@Peter Halle  I know this post about the Workshop is from a long time ago, but I have a question (with some background to explain the question). I have a Workshop 3000 and had been using it to sharpen with great success. Recently, though, I started hand sharpening with diamond stones for the coarser grits and waterstones for the last couple of steps. I have flattened the backs of my chisels better than ever before using 4000 and 8000 grit waterstones. If I take a chisel flattened by hand and then try to sharpen it on the Worksharp, the back of the chisel gets scatched because the "heatsink" on the Worksharp uses a 1500 grit piece of sandpaper. Based on your experience with the Worksharp, do you have a way of getting around this. I was thinking of buying very fine sandpaper for the heatsink (like up to 10,000 grit wet/dry if that exists) but doubt that sandpaper that fine would actually help hold the chisel in place while sharpening which I think is the purpose of the little squares of sandpaper Worksharp directs to be mounted. Have you run up against this problem? If so, how have you solved it? I love sharpening with the Worksharp because it's so fast, but the results are much better using a Veritas MKII guide and diamond and waterstones.
Randy

Offline jonny round boy

  • Posts: 3227
Re: Worksharp Sharpening Station
« Reply #21 on: December 07, 2015, 02:40 PM »
@Peter Halle  I know this post about the Workshop is from a long time ago, but I have a question (with some background to explain the question). I have a Workshop 3000 and had been using it to sharpen with great success. Recently, though, I started hand sharpening with diamond stones for the coarser grits and waterstones for the last couple of steps. I have flattened the backs of my chisels better than ever before using 4000 and 8000 grit waterstones. If I take a chisel flattened by hand and then try to sharpen it on the Worksharp, the back of the chisel gets scatched because the "heatsink" on the Worksharp uses a 1500 grit piece of sandpaper. Based on your experience with the Worksharp, do you have a way of getting around this. I was thinking of buying very fine sandpaper for the heatsink (like up to 10,000 grit wet/dry if that exists) but doubt that sandpaper that fine would actually help hold the chisel in place while sharpening which I think is the purpose of the little squares of sandpaper Worksharp directs to be mounted. Have you run up against this problem? If so, how have you solved it? I love sharpening with the Worksharp because it's so fast, but the results are much better using a Veritas MKII guide and diamond and waterstones.

The sandpaper in the heatsink isn't to hold the blade, it's supposedly to remove any burrs on the back of the blade as it's withdrawn. It's never really bothered me, but I can't see any reason why you couldn't swap it for a much higher grit, or do away with it altogether.
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Offline grbmds

  • Posts: 2085
Re: Worksharp Sharpening Station
« Reply #22 on: December 07, 2015, 08:57 PM »
@Peter Halle  I know this post about the Workshop is from a long time ago, but I have a question (with some background to explain the question). I have a Workshop 3000 and had been using it to sharpen with great success. Recently, though, I started hand sharpening with diamond stones for the coarser grits and waterstones for the last couple of steps. I have flattened the backs of my chisels better than ever before using 4000 and 8000 grit waterstones. If I take a chisel flattened by hand and then try to sharpen it on the Worksharp, the back of the chisel gets scatched because the "heatsink" on the Worksharp uses a 1500 grit piece of sandpaper. Based on your experience with the Worksharp, do you have a way of getting around this. I was thinking of buying very fine sandpaper for the heatsink (like up to 10,000 grit wet/dry if that exists) but doubt that sandpaper that fine would actually help hold the chisel in place while sharpening which I think is the purpose of the little squares of sandpaper Worksharp directs to be mounted. Have you run up against this problem? If so, how have you solved it? I love sharpening with the Worksharp because it's so fast, but the results are much better using a Veritas MKII guide and diamond and waterstones.

The sandpaper in the heatsink isn't to hold the blade, it's supposedly to remove any burrs on the back of the blade as it's withdrawn. It's never really bothered me, but I can't see any reason why you couldn't swap it for a much higher grit, or do away with it altogether.

I like the result on the Worksharp. However, for the first time in my life, I have some chisels with completely flat backs and scratching them up on the sandpaper on the heat sink hurt. I didn't expect that result. I'll have to look for some 8000 grit sandpaper. I've never seen any but I suppose it exists in auto body stores for auto paint work.
Randy

Offline grbmds

  • Posts: 2085
Re: Worksharp Sharpening Station
« Reply #23 on: December 10, 2015, 10:39 PM »
@danjames Whatever way you go, the best advice I ever got was to pick one method and stick with just that method; no mixing of methods. So, if you go with the Worksharp, stick with the Worksharp and that only. If you go the direction of the MKII honing guide and stones stick only to that. The MKII also has a narrow blade guide accessory which should work for all chisels. It holds the blade by clamping the sides instead of the top clamp method. I found this accessory holds the chisels perfectly straight and square to the sharpening surface and keeps them square; or enough to get an edge so sharp that just bumping your hand against it by accident will result in a major cut (no details on my research methods).

Just to clarify, I'm no expert on this, but found through research and a great class from Christopher Schwarz and a Lie-Nielsen expert hand sharpening isn't all that tough and the results are worth it.

One last note: I do own a Worksharp and find that it is easy to sharpen on. However, I have never got good enough results when trying to flatten the back of my chisels on it. Once I do that, going back to the Worksharp is really mixing methods and the results are not as good for me.
Randy

Offline Jim Kirkpatrick

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Worksharp Sharpening Station
« Reply #24 on: December 11, 2015, 08:30 PM »
Here is a thread started by Jerry Work:     Worksharp

Here is the manual / review he did for the WorkSharp:  Manual / Review of Worksharp

Peter

@Peter Halle   Whatever happened to Jerry Work?  His posts helped me a lot when I first got into Festool.
« Last Edit: December 11, 2015, 08:32 PM by Jim Kirkpatrick »

Offline JimD

  • Posts: 510
Re: Worksharp Sharpening Station
« Reply #25 on: December 22, 2015, 08:30 PM »
I like my worksharp 3000 and I have the knife attachment which works well too.  I bought an extra glass disc and some finer sandpaper but I don't think it's necessary.  It works well with the stock abrasives.  I also have a water wheel (motorized) and hand water stones and a holder to keep the angle constant and they work too.  But the Worksharp 3000 does a good job and does it quickly.  There are also wheels with louvers on them so you can sharpen turning tools on the underside.  I haven't tried that yet but I am confident it works.  It's a nice tool.

Offline Bohdan

  • Posts: 1024
Re: Worksharp Sharpening Station
« Reply #26 on: December 22, 2015, 09:28 PM »
  There are also wheels with louvers on them so you can sharpen turning tools on the underside.  I haven't tried that yet but I am confident it works.  It's a nice tool.

The wheels with the louvers are made of plastic and I find that they flex slightly resulting in a different (not 90 degrees) angle on your chisel compared with the glass wheel. They are however excellent for see the grinding action happening and great for freehand sharpening of turning or carving tools.

I think that the extra wheel should be used for some intermediate grits as I find that the jump from coarse to fine a bit much. You spend too much effort removing the coarse scratches with the fine wheel.

Offline grbmds

  • Posts: 2085
Re: Worksharp Sharpening Station
« Reply #27 on: December 22, 2015, 10:10 PM »
While I am moving toward using stones and manual sharpening, I have used my Worksharp and it's best to move through the progression of grits they have available in steps from coarse to fine to very fine. You can even get up to 6000 grit. However, I'm not sure I see the point of that if the lapping plate is covered with their 1500 grit 2 X 2 squares. If the back and the front aren't polished to the same grit, I don't believe the result will be any better than the result you'd get if you used 1500 on both.
Randy

Offline hemdale

  • Posts: 109
Re: Worksharp Sharpening Station
« Reply #28 on: March 05, 2016, 04:50 AM »
Dan,

Buy it.

That tool is one of the tools that I have never regretted buying.  I have only used it for straight chisels.  No gouges, turning tools, etc.  There was a thread here not too long ago about what tools were keepers and it made that list consistently from many members.

Peter

Hi Peter,

Can't find the "keepers" thread anywhere, could you help ?

Thks !