Author Topic: Woodpeckers Rules Fading Over Time  (Read 9516 times)

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Offline JimH2

  • Posts: 1180
Re: Woodpeckers Rules Fading Over Time
« Reply #30 on: January 12, 2022, 05:02 PM »
Is there a source for this? It really sounds unbelievable given they did not change the company name. I am not familiar with their business lines in the 70's, but I doubt people switch tape brands or companies using their commercial products switched suppliers.

I don't know Jim, the only reason I know this is because I lived through the changeover and it was a very, very hot topic among the employees at the time. A lot of employees just shook their heads and dropped their jaws.  [smile]

Without going too far off topic signage was a huge expense with over 200 manufacturing plants, 150-200 office buildings, 100,000 employees and 50,000 products, advertising brochures, stationery & envelopes, water towers that needed to be changed, employee badges, the list was endless and I might add, at the time a decent yearly raise was 1% or 2%...hot topic indeed.

That makes sense. I misread your original post thinking it was lost sales only. When you add up all that related costs it makes complete sense. I have never understood rebranding other than the people who sell the stuff you need to rebrand make easy money. Most of the mergers and consolidations of large companies rarely benefit anyone and typically do not result in any savings for the consumer. It does kill off competition and helps guarantee price controls and a whole bunch of employees of the merged companies losing their jobs.

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Offline fritter63

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  • Posts: 1457
Re: Woodpeckers Rules Fading Over Time
« Reply #31 on: January 14, 2022, 08:14 PM »

Chevrolet tried to use this technology for the Chevrolet Chevette starting in 1976, but the anodizing was not up to the task of consumer driving and they abandoned that tech.

And Vega. I owned one. :( My first car actually, 4 years old and I got it for $300. Burned more oil than gas thanks to those aluminum cylinder walls.

Offline rst

  • Posts: 2844
Re: Woodpeckers Rules Fading Over Time
« Reply #32 on: January 14, 2022, 09:41 PM »
So the Vegas were burning oil...I always thought they were spraying for bugs

Offline demographic

  • Posts: 755
Re: Woodpeckers Rules Fading Over Time
« Reply #33 on: March 09, 2022, 06:30 PM »
Anodizing was originally produced to prevent the formation of aluminum oxide ("white rust", a white powdery substance).  It was offered in clear only. 

It is not a coating.  It penetrates the surface of the aluminum.

The longer the aluminum was left in the solution the deeper into the surface is the protection (and the color).

It also hardens the surface substantially.  Some race car engine blocks are made of aluminum with no cast-iron liners.  The block is hardened by "hard anodizing" to achieve acceptable wear resistance.  Typically these engine blocks are replaced after the 250 or 500-mile race.

Chevrolet tried to use this technology for the Chevrolet Chevette starting in 1976, but the anodizing was not up to the task of consumer driving and they abandoned that tech.

I've not heard of cylinders being anodised, do you have a link with a bit more information about it?
I have a motorbike with a NicaSil coated cylinder (Nickle, Silicon Carbide) and theres various versions of Nickle Silicon ceramic used to coat cylinders but I reckon its kind of overkill for a long straightedge or ruler.

Offline jobsworth

  • Posts: 6920
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Re: Woodpeckers Rules Fading Over Time
« Reply #34 on: March 16, 2022, 02:27 PM »
funny,

My red Paolini rules have faded but none of my other red WP stuff has

Offline Packard

  • Posts: 1640
Re: Woodpeckers Rules Fading Over Time
« Reply #35 on: March 16, 2022, 04:13 PM »
Anodizing was originally produced to prevent the formation of aluminum oxide ("white rust", a white powdery substance).  It was offered in clear only. 

It is not a coating.  It penetrates the surface of the aluminum.

The longer the aluminum was left in the solution the deeper into the surface is the protection (and the color).

It also hardens the surface substantially.  Some race car engine blocks are made of aluminum with no cast-iron liners.  The block is hardened by "hard anodizing" to achieve acceptable wear resistance.  Typically these engine blocks are replaced after the 250 or 500-mile race.

Chevrolet tried to use this technology for the Chevrolet Chevette starting in 1976, but the anodizing was not up to the task of consumer driving and they abandoned that tech.

I've not heard of cylinders being anodised, do you have a link with a bit more information about it?
I have a motorbike with a NicaSil coated cylinder (Nickle, Silicon Carbide) and theres various versions of Nickle Silicon ceramic used to coat cylinders but I reckon its kind of overkill for a long straightedge or ruler.

I believe you are correct.  The pistons were anodized to harden them. 

https://www.enginebuildermag.com/2016/04/honing-aluminum-blocks/

The surface of hard anodized aluminum is as hard as chrome (which is a very hard metal).

https://www.matweb.com/reference/anodize.aspx

According to this article it achieves a Rockwell hardness rating of 65 to 70 on the C scale.   Mild steel on the other hand does not eve use the C scale as it is too soft for that.  It is on the B scale.  So hard anodized aluminum is harder than mild steel.   

Offline demographic

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Re: Woodpeckers Rules Fading Over Time
« Reply #36 on: March 17, 2022, 07:05 PM »
Yeah, it makes sense to me that the pistons would be anodised.

Offline Cheese

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Re: Woodpeckers Rules Fading Over Time
« Reply #37 on: March 17, 2022, 09:48 PM »
Yeah, it makes sense to me that the pistons would be anodised.

JE pistons is a big promoter of hard coat anodizing pistons for HP use. Have never yet seen aluminum block cylinder walls anodized for hard coat wear protection. The typical alternative is to  offer cast iron liners or Nik-a-sil liners. In the case of a cataclysmic engine failure, it’s far easier to bore the cylinders and remove the liners and reinstall new ones. Besides, cast iron or Nik-a-sil liners offer a superior surface for bedding rings.

Offline Packard

  • Posts: 1640
Re: Woodpeckers Rules Fading Over Time
« Reply #38 on: March 18, 2022, 09:20 AM »
Racecar engines (and apparently Chevy Vegas) sometimes use unlined aluminum blocks.  For the race cars, they only use the engine block for about 250 miles.  For the Chevy Vega, it was a maintenance nightmare.  Apparently having no liner improves cooling and allows for tighter tolerances. 

What I thought I knew about these engines (I thought the cylinders were anodized) was incorrect.  So I won't spout any more "information".