Author Topic: Stihl interesting  (Read 25992 times)

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Offline SRSemenza

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Re: Stihl interesting
« Reply #60 on: August 24, 2015, 10:07 AM »
Had another days productive gardening with the pole pruner and the strimmer. I hacked down as much stuff with the pruner in half an hour as my wife managed to achieve in a day last year.


   Yeah the pole pruner is great (I have a gas model)! BUT be careful you can make a big mess to pick up real fast. One of the first times I used it I spent maybe an hour  cutting all around the property. When I got done I looked around and thought Oh cr..   [eek]  Took me about six hours the next day to clean it all up.  [blink]

Seth

@SRSemenza, I don't think you are cutting real navy stuff with the pole pruner.  You should put your Grasshopper to good use along with the pruner.  When i do a pruning job, large or small, i use my Skag to clean up the brush.  A few minutes with the mower and a few minutes with the sweep rake, and the mess has disappeared.  You would be surprised how large diameter twigs/branches can disappear in a hurry with no damage to the mower blades. 
Tinker

   Yes, I do use the Grasshopper to get rid of a lot of the twigs now.  But that first time was a lot 2" -4" limbs from about 20 big pine trees.  ::)  It is mostly smaller stuff now. I just got the hedge trimmer attachment and use that for the forsythia , willow tree and such. That debris was quickly windrowed with a rake and then ground up with the Grasshopper. I try to stay under 1" for Grasshopper "shredding".

Seth

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Offline johninthecamper

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Re: Stihl interesting
« Reply #61 on: August 24, 2015, 11:29 AM »
When the shops are closed and one needs oil then one does what is required.
30wt mixed with kerosene

Offline Tinker

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Re: Stihl interesting
« Reply #62 on: August 24, 2015, 08:17 PM »
@SRSemenza    You can shred the smaller stuff off of the larger branches if yo can get the heavy to be flat of the ground.  I have a bunch of slightly bent blades for my Skag.  i will put them on when i am getting into heavier branches. It does take a little preparation.

I even cut brush and briars with the mower.  As long as the stems are not over 3/4" to 1", I can do quite a large area in an hour or so. When mowing brush, I wait until blades are due for sharpening or ready for new.  I do the brush before i change the blades.  that way I don't ruin brand new blades.

I am going to talk to my equipment guru and see what he knows about battery trimmers.  He handles Husky and Josenrod.  I battery operated trimmers and chainsaws are on the horizon, I will wait til he handles. If they are not, I will look into the Stihl's.  I like the idea of not having to make a lot of noise.  I try to do that work almost as soon as daylite.  Some people think that is still nite time.  [wink]  Also, in winter, i have to keep my chainsaw close to the truck heater.  I sometimes need to cut a few branches before i can get into a driveway, or a roadway to plow.  If the saw is not warm, i cannot even pull the cord.  It's funny how much resistance there is with the new saws.  Way back when i was 38, i did not have such problems.  ::)

Tinker
Wayne H. Tinker

Offline Cheese

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Re: Stihl interesting
« Reply #63 on: August 24, 2015, 10:11 PM »
@SRSemenza   
If the saw is not warm, i cannot even pull the cord.  It's funny how much resistance there is with the new saws.  Way back when i was 38, i did not have such problems.  ::)

Tinker

In the interest of reducing the weight of the equipment, manufacturers are fitting smaller displacement engines on their tools. This reduces the weight and also increases the fuel economy (probably does something for the emissions they have to achieve too). However, some of these small engines don't quite have the power that's needed, so the manufacturers increase the compression ratio of the engine, which can significantly increase the HP if done correctly. The down side is that anyone that is 38 or older, will have a hard time trying to pull start the engine. Stihl is noted for this...I have a Stihl TS 400 concrete saw that is notorious for this behavior.

Way back when I was 38, I had a BSA 441 Victor motorcycle that incorporated a compression release. You'd pull in the compression release and slowly move the kick starter so that the engine was slightly past TDC (top dead center) release the compression release and give it a good hard kick. It would usually start on 1 kick if done properly. If not done correctly it would kick back and bend your knee/leg into a position that would make you assume your leg was broken, or it would literally send you over the tank and onto the ground. Hmmm...that was in 1966...guess in some areas we haven't progressed much.

Offline Tinker

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Re: Stihl interesting
« Reply #64 on: August 25, 2015, 07:34 AM »
@SRSemenza   
If the saw is not warm, i cannot even pull the cord.  It's funny how much resistance there is with the new saws.  Way back when i was 38, i did not have such problems.  ::)

Tinker

In the interest of reducing the weight of the equipment, manufacturers are fitting smaller displacement engines on their tools. This reduces the weight and also increases the fuel economy (probably does something for the emissions they have to achieve too). However, some of these small engines don't quite have the power that's needed, so the manufacturers increase the compression ratio of the engine, which can significantly increase the HP if done correctly. The down side is that anyone that is 38 or older, will have a hard time trying to pull start the engine. Stihl is noted for this...I have a Stihl TS 400 concrete saw that is notorious for this behavior.

Way back when I was 38, I had a BSA 441 Victor motorcycle that incorporated a compression release. You'd pull in the compression release and slowly move the kick starter so that the engine was slightly past TDC (top dead center) release the compression release and give it a good hard kick. It would usually start on 1 kick if done properly. If not done correctly it would kick back and bend your knee/leg into a position that would make you assume your leg was broken, or it would literally send you over the tank and onto the ground. Hmmm...that was in 1966...guess in some areas we haven't progressed much.

@Cheese I first learned to operate various pieces of equipment back in the early and mid '40's  1940's that is.  i was living on my great uncle's farm.  when i first arrived, we had all horse drawn machinery.  All i had to do was wait for an adult to harness and "hitch" the team and then i could "drive" for some operations.  Along about 1940, or 41, we got a Farmall F-12 tractor with the iron lug wheels.  I guess i was about 13, maybe only 12, when i was first allowed to drive that monster. Actually, in that time, the F-12 was the smallest of the line; but to shift, i had to slide down so I was sitting on top of the transmission, hang onto the steering wheel with my left hand stretched far above my head and using my right hand at about my chin to operate the gearshift lever. I was stretched out almost flat on my back as I would be pushing for all i was worth on the clutch. With those old "box" gears, I had to bring the tractor to a dead stop before shifting.  It could have been somewhat dangerous for me hanging on to the steering wheel.  The front wheels were tricycle type with iron rib around the iron wheel.  The slightest bump could send the steering wheel into a spin that could break my skinny arms.  I learned early on that one never wraps his hand around the steering wheel with thumb inside the arc of the wheel.  When hitting a bump, as the wheel would spin and your thumb locked against a spoke could break thumb and wrist.  I still, to this day, even with power steering, find myself hanging on to steering wheels with my thumb on top of the wheel, never inside where the spoke can whack me if i hit a bump.  Of course, that never happens with today's vehicles.  When my kids first learned to drive, some vehicles, including my trucks, did not have power steering.  even tho the improvements were such that kick back was long a thing of the past, i taught both of them to never wrap your thump under the rim.  They never learned, and probably will go to their graves thinking, "My Old Man was a total nut."

By the time i was allowed to crank that old F-12, I was totally into the habit of not locking my thumbs around a steering wheel.  I was instructed as a very strict rule that it was even more important when starting that tractor.  you see, the self starter was actually a hand crank that was inserted directly into the front of the engine driveshaft. If the engine fired early, the crank handle would kick back with the potential to break, not only a thumb and wrist, but an elbow and possibly dislocate a shoulder.  It was also very important to be sure the tractor was out of gear when hand cranking.  I knew of one person in the local area who was buried at a very young age when he pulled up on the crank, (incidentally, you never push down on that crank.  A short pull/snap up with never going all the way to top of the spin was as important as not wrapping one's thumb), the huge tractor jumped ahead.  He tried to get to the shift, but was flattened.

Anyhow, your, @ Cheese, reply brought back some great (and not so great) memories of "the Good Ol' Days"  Any body who says "they just don't make them like they useter" just ain't been around the "useter"

Tinker
Wayne H. Tinker

Offline Cheese

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Re: Stihl interesting
« Reply #65 on: August 25, 2015, 09:19 AM »
@Tinker
Good story, if someone nowadays saw a young Tinker driving a tractor as you describe, they'd have the local authorities hauling your great uncle to the slammer for child endangerment. [jawdrop]

Interesting though that in both cases whether starting the Farmall or the Beezer, a short quick movement was needed to get the engine turned over and after that the limb used (arm or leg) had to be removed immediately from the area or serious damage could be the outcome.

BTW I'm a fan of all old tractors, been thinking about restoring a Ford 8N for the last 15 years or so.

Offline Tinker

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Re: Stihl interesting
« Reply #66 on: August 25, 2015, 11:52 AM »
@ Cheese
I taught my son the same way.  I did post a pic somewhere on the FOG showing him at 5yr old operating my backhoe mounted on my skid steer.  He was so small, he had to rest his feet on the valve bank.  He went thru many hours of his dad hanging on to him before he was allowed to operate alone.  Son taught grandson the same way. But somebody did blow the whistle on him.  I was taught, my son was taught and my grandson was taught how to properly operate with safety in mind.  all three of us were taught and not allowed to operate until we showed respect for the machines, and of more importance, for our own and others safety.  I had the good fortune to have grown up (for 6 formative years) on a small dairy farm.  You live with thoughts of safety.  you end up expanding your horizons very quickly.  If more kids today had such advantages, there would be far less drugs problems and far less delinquency.  times were tough financially in those days; but the experiences generated responsibilities.  Today, such experiences generate whistle blowers. [sad]
Tinker
Wayne H. Tinker

Offline Holmz

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Re: Stihl interesting
« Reply #67 on: August 25, 2015, 05:10 PM »
There are always people willing to lend their sage advice on child rearing, whether in your area or with respect to European ways.

Offline Cheese

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Re: Stihl interesting
« Reply #68 on: August 26, 2015, 12:26 AM »
@Tinker
You're discussion is something that transcends the internet, I have so much to say and yet I'm speechless...political correctness, a pox on society. I may be a product of my generation but that's ok...I think I have an easier time living within my skin than some from other generations. Soul searching is the correct terminology and I perform it every day as would anyone who has a conscience.

Enough...back to the Farmall and the Beezer...and happier times.

Offline Tinker

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Re: Stihl interesting
« Reply #69 on: August 26, 2015, 03:37 AM »
As I was driving along with my Kabota Tractor/Loader yesterday, I came around a corner and there was a man trimming a high hedge with a Stihl pole trimmer.  If it had not been for my reading of this thread, i would not have given it a second thought.  The trimmer was making absolutely no noise.  a big pile of clippings was showing on the ground all around the hedge and I could see the blade was quickly adding more clippings as it was being drawn across the top of the hedge.  BUT>>> no noise.  It was a narrow road and a tight corner, so I could not stop, but I now know cordless electric trimmers are around.  I will be on the lookout from now on.  I am leaving for work a little early this morning and will be at my Guru's shop as he opens.  I will check with him if he knows about battery op tools on the Husky horizon.  Or Jonsored.
Tinker
Wayne H. Tinker