Author Topic: Makita XBU02  (Read 3428 times)

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Offline mcfal12

  • Posts: 4
Makita XBU02
« on: November 20, 2021, 11:54 AM »
Let me start by stating that I am unequivocally a fan of Makita. It’s an outstanding platform and I despise ‘cords’ in the 21st century. That said I will as always be objective about the pros and cons of this blower as I. compare it to the Ego LB5300 56v blower, which I also own.

Let’s start with the run time. With two 5 aH batteries, on its highest setting the blower will run no more than 15 minutes. This is ~7 minutes shorter than running the Ego 56v on ‘turbo mode’ with a 5 aH battery. Also with two batteries the blower weighs in at nearly 10 pounds- approximately 1.5 pounds (as best I can judge it) heavier than the Ego. In either case you’ll be switching arms frequently and/or taking breaks from arm fatigue.

The advertised 473 cfm of air volume and max velocity of 120 mph provide ample power to move debris and leaves on patios and driveways; as well as on grass. I’ve observed no discernible difference between the Makita and Ego which offers higher volume at lower maximum velocity.

Along with the benefit of not having to deal with the oil, gas and associated maintenance of a gas blower, you won’t go deaf if you don’t (not recommended) use ear protection. Although the Ego is rated at about 2/3rds of the decibels of the Makita, I cannot say I observed the Makita as significantly louder than the Ego. In fact the Makita’s sound is more of a whirls (like a 'toy helicopters propellers) where as the Ego would never be mistaken as anything more than a blower.

Another great feature on this Makita blower is the adjustable nozzle. At 6’5" tall, most blowers I’ve used are too short. The Ego is no exception. When set to its longest length the Makita nozzle rests just off the ground where I find it most effective. It’s also worth noting the ‘trigger lock’. I didn’t think this was a feature I would find particularly useful. However after using the feature I miss it on the Ego.

The 6 available speed/volume settings also offer the most complete range of options I’ve seen on a cordless blower. While the Ego offers ‘low’, ‘high’ and ‘turbo’, the diversity of the Makita stands out in this class of tool.

Of minor annoyance is the intake for the blower. Located below the batteries, I find (especially when switch hands) that it ‘sucks up’ my clothing for a brief second. The Ego sets the intake below the handle and in front of the batteries. This design eliminates your clothing being ‘sucked up’ but I’ve found it’s occasionally traps a small leaf or twig during use; so neither design stands out.

Earlier I mentioned the weight of the blower and I’ll touch on the balance by simply saying it is perfectly balanced with the weight of the two batteries. I find the Ego to also be well balanced although I give the edge to Makita on this point.

So in conclusion, will I be returning the Makita? Absolutely not! It’s a great compliment to my other Makita tools including the (DUB182Z blower) and to my Ego blower. It however is not for those not already on the Makita platform due to cost and in comparison to the performance of its competitors. Simply put- the performance is not substantially better than the Ego. For $150 you can purchase the Ego blower with a 2 aH battery. For an additional $250 you can purchase a 5 aH Ego battery and have a blower and two batteries for approx $100 less than the full Makita kit.

All that said, for those on the Makita platform with a compliment of 3, 4 or 5 aH batteries- this might be worthy of consideration if you desire a battery powered blower with an adjustable length nozzle, lots of power and air volume!

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Offline squall_line

  • Posts: 1504
Re: Makita XBU02
« Reply #1 on: November 20, 2021, 10:10 PM »
I have the XBU03, which is the 18v version without any included extensions.  It's great for blowing out the garage after a windy day.  I love the dial-a-speed lock, definitely reduces hand fatigue.

I noticed the same thing on the 18v model with regards to sucking up clothing.  Otherwise, as you mentioned, it's nicely balanced.  The 18v model isn't as heavy since it's only running a single battery.

Offline Peter_C

  • Posts: 1382
Re: Makita XBU02
« Reply #2 on: November 21, 2021, 02:31 AM »
Makita also offers the backpack battery carriage system, but I have no idea how that changes the center of gravity on their power equipment.

The Milwaukee M18 leaf blower also sucks clothing up for a couple of seconds. *shrugs*

Owning a LOUD Stihl backpack blower that will soon be sold, I agree the nozzle near the ground pointed forward makes a big difference. I do get a little arm pump after a reasonably long time of running the Stihl blower, but most of the pressure is transferred to the backpack. The much quieter Milwaukee replaced the backpack blower out of convenience as I store the electric inside the garage. My arms get tired fairly quickly even switching off hands, while tearing through 9.0Ah batteries when clearing large sections of our driveway. It is powerful enough you have to push against it. Although my tiny wife likes using the electric blower, which is good for me. With a lighter 5Ah battery she can clear the deck, and patio in a few minutes.

Stihl just released some new electric power equipment and advances will be coming quickly as gasoline goes the wayside for yard equipment. I own all professional brand gas yard tools that I just don't use anymore, as electric does just as well, and sometimes better. I LOVE my Makita 36volt top handle chainsaw for climbing (Gas is still best with larger bars). I can only imagine the tools coming soon will be far superior to what is offered today even.


Offline Lbob131

  • Posts: 569
Re: Makita XBU02
« Reply #3 on: November 21, 2021, 09:45 AM »
Petrol  is  best  for  chain saws.
Never  seen gas  used  in them  before. You  would  need a pressurized   container   and  refilling   wouldn't be easy.

Offline Crazyraceguy

  • Posts: 1852
Re: Makita XBU02
« Reply #4 on: November 21, 2021, 10:31 AM »
Petrol  is  best  for  chain saws.
Never  seen gas  used  in them  before. You  would  need a pressurized   container   and  refilling   wouldn't be easy.
That's a UK definition difference from America......Petrol = Gasoline (Gas)
CSX
DF500 + assortment set
PS420 + Base kit
OF1010
OF1010F
OF1400
MFK700 (2)
TS55, FS1080, FS1400 holey, FS1900, FS3000
CT26E + Workshop cleaning set
RO90
RO125
ETS EC 125
RAS115
ETS 125 (2)
TS75
Shaper Origin/Workstation
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Installers set
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Offline Peter_C

  • Posts: 1382
Re: Makita XBU02
« Reply #5 on: November 21, 2021, 05:55 PM »
Petrol  is  best  for  chain saws.
Never  seen gas  used  in them  before. You  would  need a pressurized   container   and  refilling   wouldn't be easy.
We can put your "boot" into our vehicles "trunk" which rides on "tires, not tyres, that are measured in inches. *shrugs*

Offline notenoughcash

  • Posts: 244
  • too many ideas, not enough cash....
Re: Makita XBU02
« Reply #6 on: November 22, 2021, 04:28 AM »
the UK version is the DUB362, and its not a bad tool yes.  i think the issue with the makita OPE is that the batteries are designed for powertools, witch, generally, as a rule, other than grinders and stuff, are used in short bursts, e.g. you dont hold the trigger down on a impact for 15-20 min straight, which for this reason, the batteries on OPE dont last as long.  i would say spinning a 305mm miter saw blade is harder than a 305mm of trimmer line, but the mitre saw lasts longer, just because of how its used.  the cell patern on batteries dedicated OPE batteries also differ, and they generally run a bit cooler, and henceforth, longer.

But good and fair overview [big grin]

i think they also do an XGT verson now, and if i am not mistaken Tools and stuff has one, and has done a review on it.
turns out that woodworking is 1% making things you'll use, 4% making bespoke high end firewood, 15% cleaning, and 80% looking for the blinking thing you just put down
PSC 420 EB, TSC 55 REB, CTL MIDI I

Offline Crazyraceguy

  • Posts: 1852
Re: Makita XBU02
« Reply #7 on: November 22, 2021, 07:29 PM »
Petrol  is  best  for  chain saws.
Never  seen gas  used  in them  before. You  would  need a pressurized   container   and  refilling   wouldn't be easy.
We can put your "boot" into our vehicles "trunk" which rides on "tires, not tyres, that are measured in inches. *shrugs*


But don't put your bonnet under the bonnet because the engine is under there.

The wheel is in inches, but the tire size is metric. LOL
CSX
DF500 + assortment set
PS420 + Base kit
OF1010
OF1010F
OF1400
MFK700 (2)
TS55, FS1080, FS1400 holey, FS1900, FS3000
CT26E + Workshop cleaning set
RO90
RO125
ETS EC 125
RAS115
ETS 125 (2)
TS75
Shaper Origin/Workstation
MFT clamps set
Installers set
Centrotech organizer set

Offline notenoughcash

  • Posts: 244
  • too many ideas, not enough cash....
Re: Makita XBU02
« Reply #8 on: November 23, 2021, 03:50 AM »

The wheel is in inches, but the tire size is metric. LOL

England [scared]

its a 4x2 that is 2.4m long

we still do imperial for car stuff, (vehearcal) e.g. MPG, MPH and miles, but you get a M14 lug nut.

were a mix over here, like i have a rafter square (speed square for you yanks) that is imperial only, but i use it as a square, but i do use the numbers when putting soffits and facias up.

but if you use inches on site for mesureing between point a and b you get shot down in flames, but its OK to estimate in feet, e.g. its about 6 foot high.

if you wanna b confused, come to sunny england [eek]

meanwhile, the germans [tongue]
turns out that woodworking is 1% making things you'll use, 4% making bespoke high end firewood, 15% cleaning, and 80% looking for the blinking thing you just put down
PSC 420 EB, TSC 55 REB, CTL MIDI I

Offline notenoughcash

  • Posts: 244
  • too many ideas, not enough cash....
Re: Makita XBU02
« Reply #9 on: November 23, 2021, 03:51 AM »
Repete post
turns out that woodworking is 1% making things you'll use, 4% making bespoke high end firewood, 15% cleaning, and 80% looking for the blinking thing you just put down
PSC 420 EB, TSC 55 REB, CTL MIDI I