Author Topic: Cars for woodworkers  (Read 12959 times)

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Offline Packard

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Cars for woodworkers
« on: November 05, 2021, 11:11 AM »
I could not figure out where to place this thread.  Is a car an "other tool"?  Maybe.

What cars have you had that were good/bad for woodworkers?  My guess is that this is going to revolve around cargo space.

I had a 2018 Honda CRV.  Useless for carrying lumber with less than 60" in cargo space with the seat folded down. And Less than 48" in width.  I kept the car for about 4 months (about 8,000 miles) and traded it in. 

I currently have a Chrysler Pacifica (2019, 89,000 miles).  It is advertized to carry a 4' x 8' sheet with the stow and go seats folded down.  In reality it can accommodate a full sheet of MDF (47" x 97") but it is a tight squeeze. 

Good ride, comfortable seats.  Too expensive.  Some electronic glitches (more nuisance than problem).  I will probably buy it again.

Any good rides out there?  Let us know.

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Offline ChuckS

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Re: Cars for woodworkers
« Reply #1 on: November 05, 2021, 11:48 AM »
Before I sold my Honda Pilot a few months before the pandemic started, it had served me well for hauling rough lumber (8 - 9 feet long) and sheet goods. But I never tried any 4x8 sheet, which I always get it broken down smaller (4x4 or 3x8, etc.) at the lumber yard first. These days, most stores do the cuts for free.

Now, I still have another full-size SUV, just a little smaller than the Pilot. It works well for my lumber needs, as I use ply or MDF mostly for jigs or shop builds, which don't require anything close to even half a sheet size.

For 1/8" ply, it's thin and flexible so my SUV can take the whole sheet.
« Last Edit: November 05, 2021, 11:51 AM by ChuckS »

Offline Alex

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Re: Cars for woodworkers
« Reply #2 on: November 05, 2021, 01:19 PM »
When I was 3 months in Germany for a job I had an Audi A3 sportback and it was great for moving any kind of materials. I could move standard size lumber of 2,70 meter (9 feet).

Now I have an Audi Q3 SUV at my disposale for work, and while the car itself is quite a bit bigger it can not transport as much because the seats don't fold very well.

But if you need to move sheet material you'll need a van ofcourse.

Online squall_line

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Re: Cars for woodworkers
« Reply #3 on: November 05, 2021, 01:30 PM »
I'm pleasantly surprised that my 2006 Nissan Maxima can haul 10' long 2x4s between the front seats with the trunk closed, just not very many of them.

I drove a Transit Connect as an occasional shop truck at my old job and I think the front passenger seat folded down, which made hauling longer, wider items a lot easier.  No way it would have gotten sheet goods in it very easily.

I miss my parents' old Ford Aerostar Extended.  The seats weighed a ton and were cumbersome to take out, but it held 4x8 sheets between the wheels without any problems.

Offline Packard

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Re: Cars for woodworkers
« Reply #4 on: November 05, 2021, 01:43 PM »
A note about the Chrysler Pacifica. The “stow & go” seats are not available with the hybrid or the 7 seat version, only on the 8 seat version. So, no seats to remove to transport sheet goods.

With a roller stand behind the car and the sawhorses set up, I can transfer the sheet goods by myself.

Offline Peter Kelly

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Re: Cars for woodworkers
« Reply #5 on: November 05, 2021, 03:15 PM »


Easily accommodates several 4x8 sheets with the tailgate up.

Offline ChuckS

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Re: Cars for woodworkers
« Reply #6 on: November 05, 2021, 03:24 PM »


Snip.  with the tailgate up.

That's cheating. [tongue]

Offline live4ever

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Re: Cars for woodworkers
« Reply #7 on: November 05, 2021, 03:34 PM »
I use a '14 Honda Pilot - the older generation "box" style rather than the newer curvy one.  It has >48" between the wheel wells.  Unfortunately, it's not possible to do more than about 76-80" in length of a 48" wide sheet without figuring out a way to tie the tailgate open (which I haven't done).  Still, it's been awesome for plywood (usually have the store cross-cut into rough dimension), foam insulation, drywall (small amounts - obviously full sheets would just have delivered).

I'm also able to fit 10' lumber and pipe with the tailgate closed.

Another nice feature is the window hatch in the tailgate - great for grabbing tools without opening the entire liftgate.
Current systainer to productivity ratio:  very high

Offline tjbnwi

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Re: Cars for woodworkers
« Reply #8 on: November 05, 2021, 04:23 PM »
2000 Excursion 7.3 PSD w/400K on it.

Pretty much handles whatever I need.

Tom

Edited to correct image orientation
« Last Edit: November 06, 2021, 10:19 PM by tjbnwi »

Offline Bob D.

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Re: Cars for woodworkers
« Reply #9 on: November 05, 2021, 04:26 PM »
Ah, the station wagon. An El Camino with a built in bed cap and four doors. :-)

Done in by the SUV. Chrysler tried to bring the wagon back with the Dodge Magnum,
didn't really catch on though which I thought was unfortunate.
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Offline Bob D.

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Re: Cars for woodworkers
« Reply #10 on: November 05, 2021, 04:28 PM »
2000 Excursion 7.3 PSD w/400K on it.

Pretty much handles whatever I need.

Tom

Seems it's designed for the Southern Hemisphere.  [smile]
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Offline tjbnwi

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Re: Cars for woodworkers
« Reply #11 on: November 05, 2021, 04:33 PM »
2000 Excursion 7.3 PSD w/400K on it.

Pretty much handles whatever I need.

Tom

Seems it's designed for the Southern Hemisphere.  [smile]

Very sticky tires. [big grin]

(Happens when I post from the iPad. I’ll fix it when I get to a computer.)

Tom

Offline Packard

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Re: Cars for woodworkers
« Reply #12 on: November 05, 2021, 04:33 PM »


Snip.  with the tailgate up.

That's cheating. [tongue]

I have a more modern car and the electronics will not allow me to open the tailgate unless in park and will not allow me to engage the transmission unless the tailgate is closed. So this car will carry longer pieces than my newer one.  (There is a place for cheating.)

Offline cpw

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Re: Cars for woodworkers
« Reply #13 on: November 05, 2021, 04:38 PM »
I had a 2011 Pilot.  Sheet goods would go on the roof rack, and 2-3 sheets is just around the 200 lb limit.  Lumber stuff would go through the tailgate glass and rest on the seats.  I now have a 2021 pilot and the glass does not open anymore, which makes it strictly worse for utility than the boxier version.

I have an extended cab F-150 with a 6.5' bed.  Very easy to get ~15 sheets of plywood or drywall in it - as a DIYer I haven't needed more.  With the gate down, you have a full 8' supported.  For longer trim and lumber, I have a backrack cab guard and a goal post tailgate extender that will let me get 16'+ easily extended over the cab, bed and a foot out.  The same extender can be put horizontally for longer than 8' sheets of drywall.

The extended cab isn't super comfortable in the back for 2 teenagers and a 100lb dog, but it works in a pinch and I use the medium bed for stuff more than the backseat of cab for people.

Offline mrFinpgh

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Re: Cars for woodworkers
« Reply #14 on: November 05, 2021, 05:37 PM »
I have an '03 Toyota Highlander.  Useful for moving lumber up to about 9' long if you fold down the passenger seat. Cannot fit a full sheet though.

At this point, my approach is to use it for trips to the lumberyard and if I go to the home center I can get sheet materials roughly cut (if I'm buying from the home center, it tends to be one sheet and usually it's an ad-hoc project).

For larger hauls (200bf of lumber, 15-20 sheets of particleboard) I just rent a van for a few hours. For the relatively low frequency of times that I need it, it's much more economical than owning a large vehicle.

Offline MikeGE

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Re: Cars for woodworkers
« Reply #15 on: November 05, 2021, 05:51 PM »
I bought my 2018 (2019 model year) Ford Ranger Wildtrak super cab shown in my avatar specifically for hauling lumber, sheet goods, and anything else I don't want in the seat next to or behind me.  It is my daily driver and is as comfortable at Autobahn speeds as any car I've owned.  The new ranger replaced a 2003 Ford Ranger Edge that had a stiff suspension and was brutal to drive.  Although the Wildtrak is larger in every dimension than the Edge, it just fits in my garage after I got rid of my workbenches and storage shelves.  The Edge fit with the workbenches and shelves.

With the rack I built for the bed, I can easily carry 15 full sheets of 18 or 19mm plywood in the Wildtrak with the tailgate down.

Offline Sparktrician

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Re: Cars for woodworkers
« Reply #16 on: November 05, 2021, 07:13 PM »
2015 Expedition EL - can haul 15-16 sheets of 48" x 96" x 3/4" plywood with ease, plus a bunch of Systainers and other tools, with 2nd and 3rd row seats folded down.   [smile]
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Offline Stan Tillinghast

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Re: Cars for woodworkers
« Reply #17 on: November 05, 2021, 09:31 PM »
I have been trying to find out if one can carry 4x8 sheet goods in a Kia Telluride. Haven't gone to a dealer yet.
We currently have a Honda Odyssey (2006); you have to take the very heavy middle seats out to carry sheet goods, and I've decided our next large vehicle will NOT be one where the seats need to be removed for that purpose.
Für uns...ist das Beste gerade gut genug!

Offline fignewton

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Re: Cars for woodworkers
« Reply #18 on: November 06, 2021, 07:09 AM »
Chevy Avalanche!!  I bought one new in 2002, and traded it for this one in 2005.  I don't think I'll ever get rid of it, as no other trucks have the functionality.  5' of bed with tailgate up, covered or not, and 8' with the seats and midgate (and rear window if you want) down.  I've had 12' stock under cover passing through the front seats and resting on a towel on the dash.  Plus it rides and drives great, even with the Z71 offroad package, has 4wd, Bose, heated leather, DVD in rear, etc etc.  Newer ones have center display.  I love it and they are becoming more valuable as people rediscover what they can do.
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Offline Steve1

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Re: Cars for woodworkers
« Reply #19 on: November 06, 2021, 07:42 AM »
Clearly a minivan/SUV or pickup works best for hauling.

But if you are looking for a sedan, make sure the rear seats fold down.   That helps a great deal.   
I can put 10 foot dimensional lumber into my Q50 and close the trunk.
I am limited to 32" boards for width, but in the 5 years I have had this car, that has been enough.

A few times during the pandemic lockdowns, you had to do curb-side pickup and their panel saw was not available.    So brought by circular saw, etc to the store and ripped down 4x8 sheets in the parking lot.



Offline Pompeio

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Re: Cars for woodworkers
« Reply #20 on: November 06, 2021, 07:59 AM »
 Stan:
I have a 2021 Hyundai Palisade Calligraphy which has the same dimensions as the Telluride. A 4x8 sheet of plywood does not fit so I use my F-150.

Online Cheese

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Re: Cars for woodworkers
« Reply #21 on: November 06, 2021, 09:41 AM »
Chevy Avalanche!!  I bought one new in 2002, and traded it for this one in 2005.  I don't think I'll ever get rid of it, as no other trucks have the functionality.  5' of bed with tailgate up, covered or not, and 8' with the seats and midgate (and rear window if you want) down.  I've had 12' stock under cover passing through the front seats and resting on a towel on the dash.  Plus it rides and drives great, even with the Z71 offroad package, has 4wd, Bose, heated leather, DVD in rear, etc etc.  Newer ones have center display.  I love it and they are becoming more valuable as people rediscover what they can do.
(Attachment Link)

Man @fignewton I'm with you on this one...they haul lumber, they haul large dogs, they haul groceries and the wife and all at the same time while keeping everything dry.  [big grin]

Offline afish

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Re: Cars for woodworkers
« Reply #22 on: November 06, 2021, 10:47 AM »
Chevy Avalanche!!  I bought one new in 2002, and traded it for this one in 2005.  I don't think I'll ever get rid of it, as no other trucks have the functionality.  5' of bed with tailgate up, covered or not, and 8' with the seats and midgate (and rear window if you want) down.  I've had 12' stock under cover passing through the front seats and resting on a towel on the dash.  Plus it rides and drives great, even with the Z71 offroad package, has 4wd, Bose, heated leather, DVD in rear, etc etc.  Newer ones have center display.  I love it and they are becoming more valuable as people rediscover what they can do.
(Attachment Link)

I have always liked the avalanche. 

Offline jeffinsgf

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Re: Cars for woodworkers
« Reply #23 on: November 06, 2021, 06:45 PM »
2016 Dodge Caravan with Stow and Go. Last (or possibly next to last) year for the Caravan and mine is one without all the electronic dashboard stuff. Don't know what I'll do when it dies. And, no, the Pacifica is not the same. I don't need a light show on the dash board, nor surroundings quite as plush as the Pacifica.

Offline jimbo51

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Re: Cars for woodworkers
« Reply #24 on: November 07, 2021, 08:03 AM »
I have a 2010 Ford Escape. With the slight flare out halfway up the hatch opening and a home made rack in the trailer hitch, I can carry 3 sheets of 3/4 inch 4x8 ft material. When not carrying sheet goods, I can haul 12 ft long lumber by having it stick out the sunroof. Sadly, time and 200,000 miles may have damaged the frame and suspension beyond economical repair. I can barely move 4x8 3/4 plywood any more by myself so maybe it is time to let the car go.

My 2020 Ford Escape is a joy to drive, but the rear hatch is so small that 4 ft wide material will not fit in even on the diagonal. I suppose cutting at the store is the only way to go for the future.
 

Offline Peter_C

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Re: Cars for woodworkers
« Reply #25 on: November 07, 2021, 01:02 PM »
For those with cars a small 4x8' folding trailer can haul most everything you need. They store taking up a reasonable foot print. The good thing about a trailer is no weight, other than tongue weight is on the vehicle, and there is nothing getting the interior dirty. The small trailers weigh like 160#'s or something so very light. No problem towing with a Honda or Toyota for reasonable sized loads.

Suburban, like Tom's Excursion they have a 10ft bed with the ability to lay 4' wide material flat inside. A 3/4 ton allows one to rent trailers, like a concrete U-cart, wood chipper, rent an HD drop deck trailer for moving old iron, etc.

Offline Bob D.

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Re: Cars for woodworkers
« Reply #26 on: November 07, 2021, 02:07 PM »
A small utility trailer is a good idea if you have a place to stow it. And in my state the cost is minimal, only $25 a year for registration and plate, plus no inspection and no personal property tax here so it's a low cost to move big stuff.

I wish there was a place nearby that rented drop-deck trailers. I have a 20' tilt bed but if I could find a dual axle 16 foot drop deck for sale I would buy it and sell the tilt bed. They are so much easier loading and unloading.
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Offline Rob Z

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Re: Cars for woodworkers
« Reply #27 on: November 07, 2021, 10:39 PM »
2014 Suburban.   I've removed the third row of seats, but I wish the second row folded down all the way flush with the level of the rear deck the way it does in my Dad's 2004 Suburban

I recently sold my last pickup, and after having a pickup for almost 35 years, I thought I would not be able to get by without a truck. I finally made a deal with myself that if I can't move whatever it is that I want in the Suburban, then I won't do the project.   That put an end to things like concrete work, landscaping, and demo. [big grin]

I should have figured this out a long time ago  [big grin].

Jeff mentioned the new vehicles and the 747 dashboards.  That's my worry, as well. I looked at my friend's new Tahoe and like the truck but good grief, the electronics are waaay more than what I want in a vehicle.

Offline Stan Tillinghast

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Re: Cars for woodworkers
« Reply #28 on: November 07, 2021, 11:24 PM »
 So brought by circular saw, etc to the store and ripped down 4x8 sheets in the parking lot.

Aha!! An excuse to buy a cordless track saw!

And Pompeo—thanks for the info on the Palisade.
Für uns...ist das Beste gerade gut genug!

Re: Cars for woodworkers
« Reply #29 on: November 07, 2021, 11:29 PM »
I have a Telluride.  A sheet of plywood does not fit inside. 

Offline mwolczko

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Re: Cars for woodworkers
« Reply #30 on: November 08, 2021, 12:25 AM »
The wife’s first minivan, a Town&Country, could take sheets of plywood with the seats down. The replacement, a Nissan Quest, says it can, but the driver’s seat has to be so far forward I can’t get in!

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Offline DynaGlide

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Re: Cars for woodworkers
« Reply #31 on: November 08, 2021, 07:55 AM »
My vote goes to the Pacifica. We have a 2017 and will buy another. Those stow n go seats are fantastic and fitting 4x8 plywood is easy. Recently had to get some 12' trim, just had to secure the liftgate up a bit.
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Offline Packard

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Re: Cars for woodworkers
« Reply #32 on: November 08, 2021, 08:38 AM »
I get 12 foot trim inside the cabin in my 2019 Pacifica.  I fold back the passenger seat and let the ends rest on the dash.  You can also crank down the passenger window and have the ends poke out the window.

I don't know if I can drive with the tail gait open.  I know I can with the side doors open.  I know it won't let me go in reverse with the tail gait open.
« Last Edit: November 08, 2021, 08:42 AM by Packard »

Offline Packard

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Re: Cars for woodworkers
« Reply #33 on: November 08, 2021, 08:40 AM »
2016 Dodge Caravan with Stow and Go. Last (or possibly next to last) year for the Caravan and mine is one without all the electronic dashboard stuff. Don't know what I'll do when it dies. And, no, the Pacifica is not the same. I don't need a light show on the dash board, nor surroundings quite as plush as the Pacifica.

The Pacifica is quieter and has a far better ride than the earlier models.  It handles better too.  They are now making a "decontented" version for Dodge.  I don't know if it has the stow and go feature though.  And right now is a lousy time to buy a new (or used) car.  No discounts and some models selling above suggested retail pricing.

It is blamed on the supply of components shutting down production lines.
« Last Edit: November 08, 2021, 08:43 AM by Packard »

Offline ChuckS

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Re: Cars for woodworkers
« Reply #34 on: November 08, 2021, 08:52 AM »
Very often, people who drive big cars and trucks are seen incapable of maneuvering in crowded parking areas, and they simply leave their cars UNATTENDED in spots where parking is not allowed such as in front of the supermarket (on the curbside marked Fire Lane). The truck driver below helped turn a two-way traffic corner into a single lane as both she and another driver parked their trucks in the corner (marked no parking on the ground), and did their shopping.

(Yes, they were too lazy to park a little far away and walk...and it's not even winter.)
« Last Edit: November 08, 2021, 09:11 AM by ChuckS »

Offline Packard

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Re: Cars for woodworkers
« Reply #35 on: November 08, 2021, 09:55 AM »
If you grew up in the 1950s and 1960s, when big cars reigned supreme, you would have  learned some tricks about parking the big car. 

The one lost technique (that really works well) helps in head-in parking.

Don't try to turn and head in directly into the space.  Instead, overshoot your target space by 1½ spaces.  Then cut your wheel hard and back up.  It will align you with the space you want to pull into.  So instead of pulling into the space at an angle, you can now pull in parallel to the lines on the ground. 

This is much faster and easier than jockeying back and forth trying to straighten the car. 

My pet beef is those people who park in the access aisle alongside the van accessible handicapped parking space.  So the guy gets back with his wheelchair and cannot get back in his car.

Offline DynaGlide

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Re: Cars for woodworkers
« Reply #36 on: November 08, 2021, 12:04 PM »
2016 Dodge Caravan with Stow and Go. Last (or possibly next to last) year for the Caravan and mine is one without all the electronic dashboard stuff. Don't know what I'll do when it dies. And, no, the Pacifica is not the same. I don't need a light show on the dash board, nor surroundings quite as plush as the Pacifica.

The Pacifica is quieter and has a far better ride than the earlier models.  It handles better too.  They are now making a "decontented" version for Dodge.  I don't know if it has the stow and go feature though.  And right now is a lousy time to buy a new (or used) car.  No discounts and some models selling above suggested retail pricing.

It is blamed on the supply of components shutting down production lines.

I think you just have to trick it by inserting a carabineer into the tail gate latch. It doubles as a ratchet point when you do this. Worked for me anyway.
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Offline Picktool

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Re: Cars for woodworkers
« Reply #37 on: November 08, 2021, 03:15 PM »
I didnt grow up then but back in the 90's I had 65 chrysler new yorker (Land Barge $600, couldn't pass on it)
I just found easier to park as far away as possible. Always found a spot.
The best is when you're parked all alone to come out and see a couple cars join you.

If you grew up in the 1950s and 1960s, when big cars reigned supreme, you would have  learned some tricks about parking the big car. 

The one lost technique (that really works well) helps in head-in parking.

Don't try to turn and head in directly into the space.  Instead, overshoot your target space by 1½ spaces.  Then cut your wheel hard and back up.  It will align you with the space you want to pull into.  So instead of pulling into the space at an angle, you can now pull in parallel to the lines on the ground. 

This is much faster and easier than jockeying back and forth trying to straighten the car. 

My pet beef is those people who park in the access aisle alongside the van accessible handicapped parking space.  So the guy gets back with his wheelchair and cannot get back in his car.
Well Dogey

Offline Packard

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Re: Cars for woodworkers
« Reply #38 on: November 08, 2021, 04:49 PM »
My father had a 1960 Chrysler Imperial convertible.  It weighed over 6,000 pounds.  And the driver's seat would swivel out so that very fat guys and pregnant ladies had a easy time getting in and out of the car.  It was the first convertible I had ever seen with air conditioning. 

His was steel gray with white leather (or maybe beige--it was a long time ago).



Offline dicktill

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Re: Cars for woodworkers
« Reply #39 on: November 08, 2021, 06:31 PM »
If you grew up in the 1950s and 1960s, when big cars reigned supreme, you would have  learned some tricks about parking the big car. 

The one lost technique (that really works well) helps in head-in parking.

Don't try to turn and head in directly into the space.  Instead, overshoot your target space by 1½ spaces.  Then cut your wheel hard and back up.  It will align you with the space you want to pull into.  So instead of pulling into the space at an angle, you can now pull in parallel to the lines on the ground. 

This is much faster and easier than jockeying back and forth trying to straighten the car. 

My pet beef is those people who park in the access aisle alongside the van accessible handicapped parking space.  So the guy gets back with his wheelchair and cannot get back in his car.

Not to sideline the thread, but thanks for the reminder about getting into a parking spot with a large vehicle. I read something similar to this about backing into a parking spot, but can't remember it. Perhaps it is basically the same thing. Do you recall that one too.

TIA.

Offline Packard

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Re: Cars for woodworkers
« Reply #40 on: November 08, 2021, 06:49 PM »
I back into more spaces nowadays because of the backup camera.  Mine offers a calibrated view (good for backing into spaces) and a “cross traffic” (wide view) which is good for backing out of spaces.

In parking lots, backing into a space seems safer. The greater safety lies in the fact that you are facing forward when you leave the spot.  It gives you a better view of crossing traffic.

I used to be particularly skilled at parallel parking.  But I moved to exurbia about 22 years ago and I cannot recall the last time I had to parallel park.

I would warn people who like to leave their parking space by pulling forward into an empty space and driving off.  Do that with care.  Drivers seeing that empty space can pull in as you are moving from one space and then forward.  Head in accidents can occur.



Online squall_line

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Re: Cars for woodworkers
« Reply #41 on: November 08, 2021, 07:45 PM »
I would warn people who like to leave their parking space by pulling forward into an empty space and driving off.  Do that with care.  Drivers seeing that empty space can pull in as you are moving from one space and then forward.  Head in accidents can occur.

You could also drive up and over a parking block / wheel stop that you didn't realize or remember was there.

If you do that, once the first set of wheels has cleared, you might as well commit to the second set of wheels, unless there's a second barrier for the spot across from you.  Make it look intentional.

I mean, that's maybe what I might do if I found myself in that sort of situation... Not that I've done it...  [embarassed]

Offline Bob D.

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Re: Cars for woodworkers
« Reply #42 on: November 08, 2021, 10:17 PM »
"You could also drive up and over a parking block / wheel stop that you didn't realize or remember was there."

And right after you do call your mechanic and have him order a new oil pan for you.

When your car with low ground clearance comes down off that parking curb
it's gonna bounce hard and right on the oil pan.

Used to be you didn't pass your driver exam if you couldn't parallel park.
I think our high school Driver Ed class had a 69 Impala. Not the most nimble of cars.  [big grin]
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Offline Rob Z

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Re: Cars for woodworkers
« Reply #43 on: November 08, 2021, 10:23 PM »
We had a fleet of '72/'73 Torinos. Not much maneuverability with those! LOL  No AC and drivers ed in July  [eek]






Used to be you didn't pass your driver exam if you couldn't parallel park.
I think our high school Driver Ed class had a 69 Impala. Not the most nimble of cars.  [big grin]

Offline CeeJay

  • Posts: 440
Re: Cars for woodworkers
« Reply #44 on: November 09, 2021, 06:58 AM »
2018 Ford Ranger with a few mods.

Can get 1800 x 1200 sheet goods in the canopy but full size goes on top. The roller on the back of the roof rack makes this really easy.

Also goes great on the beach!





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Offline AstroKeith

  • Posts: 221
Re: Cars for woodworkers
« Reply #45 on: November 09, 2021, 07:34 AM »
I have to have sheet goods delivered, but I can pick up 2.4 timber, or 3m if it bends a bit.
Systainers seem to have been designed to fit nicely in the boot.
Plus I can get to the job quicker than most! (2nd photo is me with instructor (RHD car) on the race track)

« Last Edit: November 09, 2021, 07:36 AM by AstroKeith »
Retired engineer/scientist

Offline jaguar36

  • Posts: 247
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Re: Cars for woodworkers
« Reply #46 on: November 09, 2021, 11:47 AM »
Tesla Model S, huge amount of room in trunk and frunk for tools and such.  Can fit 10' long boards with the tailgate shut.  Sadly none of the car makers seem to care about carrying 4x8 sheets anymore. 

Offline ChuckS

  • Posts: 3807
Re: Cars for woodworkers
« Reply #47 on: November 09, 2021, 11:56 AM »
I have to have sheet goods delivered, but I can pick up 2.4 timber, or 3m if it bends a bit.
Systainers seem to have been designed to fit nicely in the boot.
Plus I can get to the job quicker than most! (2nd photo is me with instructor (RHD car) on the race track)


The Mustang!

In my college days in the 70s, I drove a Mustang (bought secondhand for $500 Cdn) for a few years, then resold it -- for exactly the same amount. But in those days, I was no match to another dream car of mine: the Stingway convertible. Now that I can afford a Stingway, my head says it's no longer a car suitable for me.  :'(
« Last Edit: November 09, 2021, 11:59 AM by ChuckS »

Offline AstroKeith

  • Posts: 221
Re: Cars for woodworkers
« Reply #48 on: November 09, 2021, 12:45 PM »
I have to have sheet goods delivered, but I can pick up 2.4 timber, or 3m if it bends a bit.
Systainers seem to have been designed to fit nicely in the boot.
Plus I can get to the job quicker than most! (2nd photo is me with instructor (RHD car) on the race track)


The Mustang!

In my college days in the 70s, I drove a Mustang (bought secondhand for $500 Cdn) for a few years, then resold it -- for exactly the same amount. But in those days, I was no match to another dream car of mine: the Stingway convertible. Now that I can afford a Stingway, my head says it's no longer a car suitable for me.  :'(

(We're probably similar age.) Compared with the Stingray the Mustang is quite an ordinary car. As a grandfather it suits me perfectly and gives me enough of a thrill every time I start it up. Excellent value for what you get. IMO
Retired engineer/scientist

Online squall_line

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Re: Cars for woodworkers
« Reply #49 on: November 09, 2021, 01:05 PM »
I rented a 2020 Mustang convertible with the ecoboost engine, and it was plenty of fun on back country two-lane roads, especially with the paddle shifter.  I don't think the same could be said of a rental-level Mustang as recently as 10 years ago.  Cars have come a LONG way in that time.

Offline Packard

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Re: Cars for woodworkers
« Reply #50 on: November 09, 2021, 01:20 PM »
In the early 1970s a friend of mine was in the house painting business.  He used his Camaro.  He loaded the supplies in the back, but I don't remember how he carried a ladder. 

He liked the car and said it was fine for his work.

Offline Peter_C

  • Posts: 1382
Re: Cars for woodworkers
« Reply #51 on: November 09, 2021, 02:25 PM »
Most vehicles today can accept some kind of receiver hitch, and Uhaul installs a lot of them. I tend to build them myself, unless a factory hitch is available used and strong enough, sticking with a 2" receiver. Most smaller car hitches are 1 1/4", which is kinda whimpy, but for me all my hitch needs are 2".

The Harbor Freight trailer works well enough for sheet goods etc. It folds up for a small foot print, making storage in a side yard possible. Did a full remodel on a house before renting it out using a HF trailer. It hauled everything from refrigerators and stoves, all kinds of wood, bags of concrete, to debris. Who wants to haul firewood or dirt inside their vehicle? The best improvement I made to my trailer was to put E-track around the perimeter for straps (I prefer L-track but already had the E-track). The reason is because if a regular hook strap comes loose at all, it can/will unhook, leaving the load to fall off. Locked into a E or L track that is pretty much impossible. Yes straps can come loose with a load shift, it happens.


Offline leakyroof

  • Posts: 2393
Re: Cars for woodworkers
« Reply #52 on: November 09, 2021, 04:32 PM »
My Work Van, before I restored it. Handles 12 foot long inside with Rear Hatch closed and R/F seat slid off the base.
 It DID hold 4 x 8 sheets inside until I started to add cabinetry to the interior, so now full sheets go on the roof via Thule Load Bars.
 It recently took home 80 pieces of 8" wide siding, all inside the Van. Very little High Tech here to go wrong.... [wink] [wink] [wink]
Not as many Sanders as PA Floor guy.....

Offline CeeJay

  • Posts: 440
Re: Cars for woodworkers
« Reply #53 on: November 10, 2021, 12:38 AM »
I rented a 2020 Mustang convertible with the ecoboost engine, and it was plenty of fun on back country two-lane roads, especially with the paddle shifter.  I don't think the same could be said of a rental-level Mustang as recently as 10 years ago.  Cars have come a LONG way in that time.
Our non-truck vehicle was until recently the V8 Mustang convertible which I cannot recommend as a woodworking tool. Can recommend it as a waking up the neighbours tool.   

Now swapped for a BMW M2. Also not a practical workshop accessory. Also a good auditory experience.

For 6 weeks while selling the Mustang we were a 3 car family.

Here’s the 850hp garage.




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Offline derekcohen

  • Posts: 618
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Re: Cars for woodworkers
« Reply #54 on: November 15, 2021, 07:04 AM »
I can get bugger all in my Boxster. But I don't care  [big grin] ... I just use my wife's run-about ...



Regards from Perth

Derek
Visit www.inthewoodshop.com for tutorials on joinery, hand tools, and my trials and tribulations with furniture builds.

Offline Rob Z

  • Posts: 1086
Re: Cars for woodworkers
« Reply #55 on: November 15, 2021, 01:00 PM »
Derek, 

That will definitely work for a run to the Home Center to buy bags of mulch and potting soil. And only $200 of diesel for the 5 mile round trip.  [scared] [big grin]


Offline rst

  • Posts: 2814
Re: Cars for woodworkers
« Reply #56 on: November 15, 2021, 01:29 PM »
Dereck, I'd be willing to bet big money that everyone stays out of her lane, all three of them.

Offline Packard

  • Posts: 1529
Re: Cars for woodworkers
« Reply #57 on: November 15, 2021, 02:49 PM »
I can get bugger all in my Boxster. But I don't care  [big grin] ... I just use my wife's run-about ...



Regards from Perth

Derek

I'm afraid you are out of luck if you want that vehicle.  Only one was built and it is out of production.  What you want is the Caterpillar 797, a big brother to the Terex.  And this one went into production.  I wonder if I can order one with an elevator built in.

Time for your wife to trade in the Terex and upgrade.   

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Terex_33-19_%22Titan%22



Online Cheese

  • Posts: 10001
Re: Cars for woodworkers
« Reply #58 on: November 15, 2021, 11:06 PM »
So here's a shot with a Toyota in the bed...or is that a Nissan...? whatever...they're all the same.

Looks like 4 lanes wide to me.



The really interesting thing to me though is, that while there is a difference in size between the Terex and the CAT 797, the most poignant difference is the method in which they motivate.

Both companies relied on their core competence to develop these huge earth/mineral moving machines.

Terex being owned by GM at the time relied on their railroad experience, while Cat being Cat relied on their typical direct drive experience.

At the time, GM owned Terex, they also owned EMD, Electro Motive Diesel which produced trains. Their approach was to power the Terex using the diesel engine/electrical generator/traction motor method...ie...a train on rubber tires.

CAT however, relied on their direct drive capabilities, which married fuel fired power plants with torque converters and automatic transmissions. I can't help but believe the later is a more efficient method to use for rubber tired vehicles.

Thus the reason Terex produced a single vehicle while CAT continues to produce multiple 797 dump trucks.

Offline RJNeal

  • Posts: 590
Re: Cars for woodworkers
« Reply #59 on: November 16, 2021, 08:46 PM »

I thought I add my two cents.
Have you walked your saw today?

Offline ChuckS

  • Posts: 3807
Re: Cars for woodworkers
« Reply #60 on: November 16, 2021, 09:56 PM »
Another option....

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Offline Bob D.

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Re: Cars for woodworkers
« Reply #61 on: November 17, 2021, 05:55 AM »
Another option....


 [big grin]

Have you seen the back side of that scene? There is a Cat D8 pushing on that stack of logs.  [wink]
-----
It's a table saw, do you know where your fingers are?

Offline notenoughcash

  • Posts: 244
  • too many ideas, not enough cash....
Re: Cars for woodworkers
« Reply #62 on: November 17, 2021, 06:03 AM »
OSHA or HSE may have something to say about that.  no fall restraint for the least
turns out that woodworking is 1% making things you'll use, 4% making bespoke high end firewood, 15% cleaning, and 80% looking for the blinking thing you just put down
PSC 420 EB, TSC 55 REB, CTL MIDI I

Online Cheese

  • Posts: 10001
Re: Cars for woodworkers
« Reply #63 on: November 17, 2021, 11:52 AM »
Another option....


 [big grin]

Have you seen the back side of that scene? There is a Cat D8 pushing on that stack of logs.  [wink]

Here's another variation of the same theme...38,000 Bd ft of lumber in 1890, about 7-8 tons.



I'm actually very interested in logging railroads and all the weird stuff that supported that effort. Those large logging sleds operated on what was called a rut road.

After the first snowfall, when the ground was firm but not yet frozen, they used a plow like apparatus that would dig 2 ruts spaced for the width of the sled runners. They'd follow that up with several waterings of the ruts, trying not to spill much water between the ruts because that was were the horses traveled.



« Last Edit: November 17, 2021, 11:56 AM by Cheese »

Offline Peter_C

  • Posts: 1382
Re: Cars for woodworkers
« Reply #64 on: November 17, 2021, 06:35 PM »
I'm actually very interested in logging railroads and all the weird stuff that supported that effort. Those large logging sleds operated on what was called a rut road.
As I am always interested in logging practices too, since they relate to so many industries, like gold in California. I had always wanted to stop at the Hinkley Fire Museum to learn more about how logging was the direct cause for so many human lives lost. Unfortunately whenever kayaking on the Kettle or such we never had time, nor made time. The devastation of past logging methods was criminal, but so was gold mining, one of the main causes of deforestation in order to power the stampers etc., with environmental damage on a scale incomparable to anything else from the mountains to the SF Bay.

Out in the woods we often find old "Donkey's" the steam engines used for skidding logs or pulling mining equipment. I get excited! Then again I enjoy modern logging equipment too, like a big kid [big grin]




Online Cheese

  • Posts: 10001
Re: Cars for woodworkers
« Reply #65 on: November 18, 2021, 10:18 AM »
The devastation of past logging methods was criminal, but so was gold mining, one of the main causes of deforestation in order to power the stampers etc., with environmental damage on a scale incomparable to anything else from the mountains to the SF Bay.

Out in the woods we often find old "Donkey's" the steam engines used for skidding logs or pulling mining equipment. I get excited! Then again I enjoy modern logging equipment too, like a big kid [big grin]

Well now that you mention it, the industry really didn't last that long considering the incredible amount of resources available. In Minnesota alone there were over 32 million acres of harvestable trees, mostly white & red pine. Within 30 years only 1% of that number remained. The consensus in 1890 was that the supply of Minnesota forests was so vast that they'd never run out of lumber.

I'm really curious how that became such a common thought as the lumber barrons had already cut down most of the forests from Maine to Wisconsin and Minnesota was just the next stopping-off point along a path that would eventually extend all the way to the West coast.

Interestingly enough, 2 years ago I came across a slab of white oak that was estimated to be 150-200 years old. The tree had fallen down in a storm outside of Stillwater. I turned the slab into a kitchen countertop....the oldest item in the house. [smile]


Offline DynaGlide

  • Posts: 1476
Re: Cars for woodworkers
« Reply #66 on: November 18, 2021, 02:03 PM »
You were right @Packard I just got some 12' trim into the Pacifica. It was MDF so that helped.
Instagram @matts.garage

Offline Packard

  • Posts: 1529
Re: Cars for woodworkers
« Reply #67 on: November 18, 2021, 03:09 PM »
You were right @Packard I just got some 12' trim into the Pacifica. It was MDF so that helped.

I’m glad that helped.

A couple of months back my auto start/stop feature stopped working.  I was not upset.  I generally toggle to the off position anyway.

What I did not know was that it is an early indicator that the battery is dying.  There are two batteries in the 2019 Pacifica.  One for the headlights and ignition, and the second for all the accessories. 

When the first one died, it drained the second.  I had to replace both.  $615.00 (includes $140.00 diagnostics charge).

The diagnostics charge is BS.  If I came to the dealer with a tire that needed air, it would not surprise me if they hit me up with a diagnostics charge. 

The batteries are the only issue I’ve had in 89,000 miles.  So not too bad.  But $615.00 for batteries?  Really?

Offline Mike Goetzke

  • Posts: 911
Re: Cars for woodworkers
« Reply #68 on: November 18, 2021, 03:49 PM »
About 4 years ago my wife wanted to get rid of her 2005 Suburban for something smaller since the kids didn't need to be hauled around. She got a Rogue and loves it and I got the Suburban. It was getting expensive to fill the Suburban for my daily commute and it was a bit large for my drive with everyone and there brother cutting you off so I bought an Altima thinking I could rent a trailer or truck for my sheet goods. Six months later I wanted something to haul my sheet goods and could carry the whole family to the ball games. OMG - should have kept the Suburban it only had 50,000 miles on it.

I ended up getting a Chevy Traverse. It was the only SUV I could find that could haul 48" wide cargo (please let me know if there are others). The bed is maybe 7' long so a 4x8 really doesn't stick out too far. I really like this Traverse. Good gas mileage, can haul 7 passengers, have lots of storage behind the rear seat, and can fit 48" wide goods.

Mike

Offline Packard

  • Posts: 1529
Re: Cars for woodworkers
« Reply #69 on: November 18, 2021, 03:58 PM »
 I live 90 miles north of Manhattan.  Not the snow belt, but we get more snow than Westchester as we average 7 degrees colder. 

I learned years ago that a good set of winter tires and front wheel drive will get me up the steepest hills in town (and I live on the steepest hill in town).  Depending upon where you live, 4 wheel drive has been oversold.  It adds expense and repairs are more expensive.  Fuel economy is worse than the FWD counterparts. 

I would not want to drive a rear wheel drive up the hill to my house, but FWD is all anyone in our area needs.  And yet 4-WD outsells front wheel drive in our area. 

It used to be that BMWs, Camaros, Mustangs and Corvettes were the cars that got stuck in the snow around here.  Nowadays most of the BMWs are 4-WD and it is just the Camaros and Mustangs that seem to be getting stuck.

Just for the record, all season tires are not nearly as effective as winter tires or the new generation of all weather tires (all weather tires are winter tire rated, speed rated and mileage rated and can be used where ordinance requires winter tires).


Offline live4ever

  • Posts: 867
Re: Cars for woodworkers
« Reply #70 on: November 18, 2021, 04:52 PM »
Surprised nobody has mentioned:

Current systainer to productivity ratio:  very high

Offline mcooley

  • Posts: 297
Re: Cars for woodworkers
« Reply #71 on: November 18, 2021, 05:10 PM »
The never be able to reach over into the bed design! Brilliant.  [sad]

Offline Bob D.

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Re: Cars for woodworkers
« Reply #72 on: November 18, 2021, 10:03 PM »
About 4 years ago my wife wanted to get rid of her 2005 Suburban for something smaller since the kids didn't need to be hauled around. She got a Rogue and loves it and I got the Suburban. It was getting expensive to fill the Suburban for my daily commute and it was a bit large for my drive with everyone and there brother cutting you off so I bought an Altima thinking I could rent a trailer or truck for my sheet goods. Six months later I wanted something to haul my sheet goods and could carry the whole family to the ball games. OMG - should have kept the Suburban it only had 50,000 miles on it.

I ended up getting a Chevy Traverse. It was the only SUV I could find that could haul 48" wide cargo (please let me know if there are others). The bed is maybe 7' long so a 4x8 really doesn't stick out too far. I really like this Traverse. Good gas mileage, can haul 7 passengers, have lots of storage behind the rear seat, and can fit 48" wide goods.

Mike

There may be others but I found this list online.

- Chevy Suburban
- Ford Explorer
- Ford Escape
- Ford Expedition
- Toyota Sequoia
- Honda Pilot
-----
It's a table saw, do you know where your fingers are?

Offline Bob D.

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Re: Cars for woodworkers
« Reply #73 on: November 18, 2021, 10:05 PM »
Surprised nobody has mentioned:



Vaporware.

People don't like to talk about figments of their imagination. :-)
-----
It's a table saw, do you know where your fingers are?

Online squall_line

  • Posts: 1504
Re: Cars for woodworkers
« Reply #74 on: November 18, 2021, 10:18 PM »
There may be others but I found this list online.

- Chevy Suburban
- Ford Explorer
- Ford Escape
- Ford Expedition
- Toyota Sequoia
- Honda Pilot

I'm very suspicious of the inclusion of the Ford Escape on that list.  It's a compact SUV/Crossover and smaller than the Edge, which is smaller than the Explorer.

I miss my parents' Aerostar, which had a partial box frame and the extended version of which could swallow all manner of things once you hauled the 100+ pound seats out of it.  Plus a 5k towing capacity!

Offline Bob D.

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Re: Cars for woodworkers
« Reply #75 on: November 18, 2021, 11:09 PM »
Yes, I think you're right, the Escape is the smallest of the Ford SUV Line which all start with a E for some reason.

Excursion (do they still make this beast built on the F-250 frame?)
Expedition
Explorer
Edge
Escape
-----
It's a table saw, do you know where your fingers are?

Offline RJNeal

  • Posts: 590
Re: Cars for woodworkers
« Reply #76 on: November 18, 2021, 11:16 PM »
I’m currently driving a Kia Soul for running around and for work. I’m an employed carpenter. 
I can haul a few boards 8’ long in side. I’ve folded down the back seat and it pretty filled up with tools. I’ve thought about get a rack for a few long things. 
If I need to move lots of stuff or large stuff then I bring out my pick up.
Rick
Have you walked your saw today?

Offline Tinker

  • Posts: 3779
Re: Cars for woodworkers
« Reply #77 on: November 19, 2021, 04:51 PM »
When I started in the mason trade, my boss had big Cadilac with the capacity in the trunk of pickup truck. That was the year before the rear fenders had the light houses. He used to have a gravel bank that i would shovel about yard  of the course gravel in the morning. On top the gravel, he would stop off at a supply yard and load enough bags of cement to last for the day. I think he had truck tires on the car. He never blew a tire with that load.

He used that Caddy for everything, including when he went visiting, he packed his wife and four kids into the seats and packed all of the food, supplies and firewood for grilling into the cavernous trunk.

Tinker
Wayne H. Tinker

Offline Packard

  • Posts: 1529
Re: Cars for woodworkers
« Reply #78 on: November 19, 2021, 04:59 PM »
Rumor had it that the Mafia was upset when the Lincoln Town Car went out of production.  Where were they going to get a car with a large enough trunk to transport a few bodies?

My dad had a 1961 or 1960 Chrysler Imperial convertible.  It weighed over 6,000 pounds and it also had a trunk that I used to climb into in order to get at the stuff at the far end of the trunk.

(Is the “far end of the trunk” called the “rear of the trunk” or the “front of the trunk”?)

Offline Bob D.

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Re: Cars for woodworkers
« Reply #79 on: November 19, 2021, 08:28 PM »
Yeah, those old boats were something. One of my first cars was a 66 Olds 98 LS which was built on the same frame as the Caddy. When I bought it was 8 years old.

Mine looked like this but was a light blue with black and dark blue interior. It had a huge truck and the rear legroom was crazy. I think it got around 10 MPG. I bought it for next to nothing because the guy thought the brakes were shot and the AC needed work. One new hose and a recharge fixed the AC, the brakes were fine. Whoever did the last brake job put the self-adjusters on the wrong side so they weren't compensating for wear on the shoes. Hence the low brake pedal and assumption that the brakes were shot. Could easily seat 6 or 7 people with room to spare.
« Last Edit: November 20, 2021, 06:26 AM by Bob D. »
-----
It's a table saw, do you know where your fingers are?

Offline Packard

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Re: Cars for woodworkers
« Reply #80 on: November 19, 2021, 10:47 PM »
Dad had a 1958 Buick Station wagon with a big V-8 and a Dynaflow (continuously variable) transmission. It got 6 mpg.  I think gas was $0.23/gallon back then. That would be $2.20/gallon in current dollars.

Offline rst

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Re: Cars for woodworkers
« Reply #81 on: November 20, 2021, 09:07 AM »
Came back from Britain in 62-63 with parents after three years of Air Force.  Sailed into New York on USS United States.  Dad picked up new Mercury Monterey, true boat of a car.  Had the  slant back rear slide down window.  Could lay across hood or trunk and head and feet not dropping.  3 barrel 390 beast.  Took that car to back from Germany tour, really got looks from locals blasting down the Autobahn.  Became my first car in 1970.   

Offline Bob D.

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Re: Cars for woodworkers
« Reply #82 on: November 20, 2021, 09:33 AM »
"Had the slant back rear slide down window."

I worked with guy years ago (70s) who had one.

I thought that rear window was way cool. He loved to surf
fish and would hang his poles out the rear window.  [eek]

No, not THAT pole.  [big grin]
-----
It's a table saw, do you know where your fingers are?

Offline rst

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Re: Cars for woodworkers
« Reply #83 on: November 20, 2021, 10:45 AM »
the plural form of pole had us wondering

Offline Tinker

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Re: Cars for woodworkers
« Reply #84 on: November 21, 2021, 07:54 AM »
My first car was a 32 Plymouth 4-door "Box". Nothing spectacular.
Myirst car out of the Army was a two-door Ford Sedan that I took the back seat out of so I could carry more tools. I was an  apprentice mason, but I was working for builder run by 3 brothers. I never knew what trade I would be working in come morning. I was interested in all building trades in those days. I bougght tools covering all of the trades so I needed a car with a lot of capacity in the trunk.

Every Friday,(pay day) i went to Norwalk where I cashed my check and put a little in the bank. If I was lucky, I parked in front of the bank (head in parking) right in front of the bankfront door. One day, I was lucky and ran in to the bank and right backout ,I jumped into the Ford that was immediately in front of the door, backed out onto the street and headed for home. As got about 50 feet down the street, I realized it was not my car. The seats were clean!   I looked in the back seat area and there were no tools. AND the seat was not missing!

I took the next right turn, continued making another right and ended up at the same parking spot I had just left. There was  man looking very puzzled and scratching his head. I parked and jumped out asking the man, "Is this what your are looking for?"

We both had the same color and model and year Ford. My key fit  both cars. His key, we discovered, fit only his car. AND,the rear seat was NOT missing in his car. AND there were no tools filling the missing seat in his car. Luckily, he had sense of humor, we both got a good laugh out of the escapade.
Tinker
Wayne H. Tinker

Offline cider

  • Posts: 61
Re: Cars for woodworkers
« Reply #85 on: November 23, 2021, 11:00 AM »
Honda Ridgeline is my solution:
  • All-wheel drive for bad weather
  • Handles like an SUV rather than a body-on-frame pickup (I don't tow or off-road)
  • 4x8 sheets lay flat when the tailgate is down
  • Reasonable tailgate height
  • Locking trunk
  • Fits in the garage  [big grin]

Downsides?  Handles like an SUV and not a car, it's not very cool, and the gas mileage isn't great.

Offline Packard

  • Posts: 1529
Re: Cars for woodworkers
« Reply #86 on: November 23, 2021, 11:10 AM »
My recommendation is this:

Before buying any car, go online to that model's owner's forum.

If I had done that, I would have known about the Honda CRV's engine problems and I would never have bought that car.  As it was I kept the car for 8,000 miles and about 5 months before I gave up on it.  The problem (failure to reach operating temperature in cold weather) was never reported in the press, but was widely discussed in the forums. 

They came up with a solution but would not retrofit to any already sold vehicles.  So I could spend $1,200.00 on the retrofit (which Honda did on the unsold cars on the dealers' lots) or I could trade it in.   I traded it in.

I think an hour's labor reading forum gossip on the vehicle you are interested in, is worth the effort.


Offline jimbo51

  • Posts: 549
Re: Cars for woodworkers
« Reply #87 on: November 23, 2021, 11:51 AM »
I am getting up in years and not as sharp as I once was.

So I bought a Ford Focus.

It didn't help.