Author Topic: Cars for woodworkers  (Read 12958 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline mwolczko

  • Posts: 78
Re: Cars for woodworkers
« Reply #30 on: November 08, 2021, 12:25 AM »
The wife’s first minivan, a Town&Country, could take sheets of plywood with the seats down. The replacement, a Nissan Quest, says it can, but the driver’s seat has to be so far forward I can’t get in!

Festool USA does not pre-approve the contents of this website nor endorse the application or use of any Festool product in any way other than in the manner described in the Festool Instruction Manual. To reduce the risk of serious injury and/or damage to your Festool product, always read, understand and follow all warnings and instructions in your Festool product's Instruction Manual. Although Festool strives for accuracy in the website material, the website may contain inaccuracies. Festool makes no representations about the accuracy, reliability, completeness or timeliness of the material on this website or about the results to be obtained from using the website. Festool and its affiliates cannot be responsible for improper postings or your reliance on the website's material. Your use of any material contained on this website is entirely at your own risk. The content contained on this site is provided for informational purposes only and does not constitute professional advice.


Offline DynaGlide

  • Posts: 1476
Re: Cars for woodworkers
« Reply #31 on: November 08, 2021, 07:55 AM »
My vote goes to the Pacifica. We have a 2017 and will buy another. Those stow n go seats are fantastic and fitting 4x8 plywood is easy. Recently had to get some 12' trim, just had to secure the liftgate up a bit.
Instagram @matts.garage

Offline Packard

  • Posts: 1529
Re: Cars for woodworkers
« Reply #32 on: November 08, 2021, 08:38 AM »
I get 12 foot trim inside the cabin in my 2019 Pacifica.  I fold back the passenger seat and let the ends rest on the dash.  You can also crank down the passenger window and have the ends poke out the window.

I don't know if I can drive with the tail gait open.  I know I can with the side doors open.  I know it won't let me go in reverse with the tail gait open.
« Last Edit: November 08, 2021, 08:42 AM by Packard »

Offline Packard

  • Posts: 1529
Re: Cars for woodworkers
« Reply #33 on: November 08, 2021, 08:40 AM »
2016 Dodge Caravan with Stow and Go. Last (or possibly next to last) year for the Caravan and mine is one without all the electronic dashboard stuff. Don't know what I'll do when it dies. And, no, the Pacifica is not the same. I don't need a light show on the dash board, nor surroundings quite as plush as the Pacifica.

The Pacifica is quieter and has a far better ride than the earlier models.  It handles better too.  They are now making a "decontented" version for Dodge.  I don't know if it has the stow and go feature though.  And right now is a lousy time to buy a new (or used) car.  No discounts and some models selling above suggested retail pricing.

It is blamed on the supply of components shutting down production lines.
« Last Edit: November 08, 2021, 08:43 AM by Packard »

Offline ChuckS

  • Posts: 3807
Re: Cars for woodworkers
« Reply #34 on: November 08, 2021, 08:52 AM »
Very often, people who drive big cars and trucks are seen incapable of maneuvering in crowded parking areas, and they simply leave their cars UNATTENDED in spots where parking is not allowed such as in front of the supermarket (on the curbside marked Fire Lane). The truck driver below helped turn a two-way traffic corner into a single lane as both she and another driver parked their trucks in the corner (marked no parking on the ground), and did their shopping.

(Yes, they were too lazy to park a little far away and walk...and it's not even winter.)
« Last Edit: November 08, 2021, 09:11 AM by ChuckS »

Offline Packard

  • Posts: 1529
Re: Cars for woodworkers
« Reply #35 on: November 08, 2021, 09:55 AM »
If you grew up in the 1950s and 1960s, when big cars reigned supreme, you would have  learned some tricks about parking the big car. 

The one lost technique (that really works well) helps in head-in parking.

Don't try to turn and head in directly into the space.  Instead, overshoot your target space by 1½ spaces.  Then cut your wheel hard and back up.  It will align you with the space you want to pull into.  So instead of pulling into the space at an angle, you can now pull in parallel to the lines on the ground. 

This is much faster and easier than jockeying back and forth trying to straighten the car. 

My pet beef is those people who park in the access aisle alongside the van accessible handicapped parking space.  So the guy gets back with his wheelchair and cannot get back in his car.

Offline DynaGlide

  • Posts: 1476
Re: Cars for woodworkers
« Reply #36 on: November 08, 2021, 12:04 PM »
2016 Dodge Caravan with Stow and Go. Last (or possibly next to last) year for the Caravan and mine is one without all the electronic dashboard stuff. Don't know what I'll do when it dies. And, no, the Pacifica is not the same. I don't need a light show on the dash board, nor surroundings quite as plush as the Pacifica.

The Pacifica is quieter and has a far better ride than the earlier models.  It handles better too.  They are now making a "decontented" version for Dodge.  I don't know if it has the stow and go feature though.  And right now is a lousy time to buy a new (or used) car.  No discounts and some models selling above suggested retail pricing.

It is blamed on the supply of components shutting down production lines.

I think you just have to trick it by inserting a carabineer into the tail gate latch. It doubles as a ratchet point when you do this. Worked for me anyway.
Instagram @matts.garage

Offline Picktool

  • Posts: 149
Re: Cars for woodworkers
« Reply #37 on: November 08, 2021, 03:15 PM »
I didnt grow up then but back in the 90's I had 65 chrysler new yorker (Land Barge $600, couldn't pass on it)
I just found easier to park as far away as possible. Always found a spot.
The best is when you're parked all alone to come out and see a couple cars join you.

If you grew up in the 1950s and 1960s, when big cars reigned supreme, you would have  learned some tricks about parking the big car. 

The one lost technique (that really works well) helps in head-in parking.

Don't try to turn and head in directly into the space.  Instead, overshoot your target space by 1½ spaces.  Then cut your wheel hard and back up.  It will align you with the space you want to pull into.  So instead of pulling into the space at an angle, you can now pull in parallel to the lines on the ground. 

This is much faster and easier than jockeying back and forth trying to straighten the car. 

My pet beef is those people who park in the access aisle alongside the van accessible handicapped parking space.  So the guy gets back with his wheelchair and cannot get back in his car.
Well Dogey

Offline Packard

  • Posts: 1529
Re: Cars for woodworkers
« Reply #38 on: November 08, 2021, 04:49 PM »
My father had a 1960 Chrysler Imperial convertible.  It weighed over 6,000 pounds.  And the driver's seat would swivel out so that very fat guys and pregnant ladies had a easy time getting in and out of the car.  It was the first convertible I had ever seen with air conditioning. 

His was steel gray with white leather (or maybe beige--it was a long time ago).



Offline dicktill

  • Posts: 370
Re: Cars for woodworkers
« Reply #39 on: November 08, 2021, 06:31 PM »
If you grew up in the 1950s and 1960s, when big cars reigned supreme, you would have  learned some tricks about parking the big car. 

The one lost technique (that really works well) helps in head-in parking.

Don't try to turn and head in directly into the space.  Instead, overshoot your target space by 1½ spaces.  Then cut your wheel hard and back up.  It will align you with the space you want to pull into.  So instead of pulling into the space at an angle, you can now pull in parallel to the lines on the ground. 

This is much faster and easier than jockeying back and forth trying to straighten the car. 

My pet beef is those people who park in the access aisle alongside the van accessible handicapped parking space.  So the guy gets back with his wheelchair and cannot get back in his car.

Not to sideline the thread, but thanks for the reminder about getting into a parking spot with a large vehicle. I read something similar to this about backing into a parking spot, but can't remember it. Perhaps it is basically the same thing. Do you recall that one too.

TIA.

Offline Packard

  • Posts: 1529
Re: Cars for woodworkers
« Reply #40 on: November 08, 2021, 06:49 PM »
I back into more spaces nowadays because of the backup camera.  Mine offers a calibrated view (good for backing into spaces) and a “cross traffic” (wide view) which is good for backing out of spaces.

In parking lots, backing into a space seems safer. The greater safety lies in the fact that you are facing forward when you leave the spot.  It gives you a better view of crossing traffic.

I used to be particularly skilled at parallel parking.  But I moved to exurbia about 22 years ago and I cannot recall the last time I had to parallel park.

I would warn people who like to leave their parking space by pulling forward into an empty space and driving off.  Do that with care.  Drivers seeing that empty space can pull in as you are moving from one space and then forward.  Head in accidents can occur.



Offline squall_line

  • Posts: 1504
Re: Cars for woodworkers
« Reply #41 on: November 08, 2021, 07:45 PM »
I would warn people who like to leave their parking space by pulling forward into an empty space and driving off.  Do that with care.  Drivers seeing that empty space can pull in as you are moving from one space and then forward.  Head in accidents can occur.

You could also drive up and over a parking block / wheel stop that you didn't realize or remember was there.

If you do that, once the first set of wheels has cleared, you might as well commit to the second set of wheels, unless there's a second barrier for the spot across from you.  Make it look intentional.

I mean, that's maybe what I might do if I found myself in that sort of situation... Not that I've done it...  [embarassed]

Offline Bob D.

  • Retailer
  • *
  • Posts: 2957
    • My Cordless Workshop
Re: Cars for woodworkers
« Reply #42 on: November 08, 2021, 10:17 PM »
"You could also drive up and over a parking block / wheel stop that you didn't realize or remember was there."

And right after you do call your mechanic and have him order a new oil pan for you.

When your car with low ground clearance comes down off that parking curb
it's gonna bounce hard and right on the oil pan.

Used to be you didn't pass your driver exam if you couldn't parallel park.
I think our high school Driver Ed class had a 69 Impala. Not the most nimble of cars.  [big grin]
-----
It's a table saw, do you know where your fingers are?

Offline Rob Z

  • Posts: 1086
Re: Cars for woodworkers
« Reply #43 on: November 08, 2021, 10:23 PM »
We had a fleet of '72/'73 Torinos. Not much maneuverability with those! LOL  No AC and drivers ed in July  [eek]






Used to be you didn't pass your driver exam if you couldn't parallel park.
I think our high school Driver Ed class had a 69 Impala. Not the most nimble of cars.  [big grin]

Offline CeeJay

  • Posts: 440
Re: Cars for woodworkers
« Reply #44 on: November 09, 2021, 06:58 AM »
2018 Ford Ranger with a few mods.

Can get 1800 x 1200 sheet goods in the canopy but full size goes on top. The roller on the back of the roof rack makes this really easy.

Also goes great on the beach!





Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

Offline AstroKeith

  • Posts: 221
Re: Cars for woodworkers
« Reply #45 on: November 09, 2021, 07:34 AM »
I have to have sheet goods delivered, but I can pick up 2.4 timber, or 3m if it bends a bit.
Systainers seem to have been designed to fit nicely in the boot.
Plus I can get to the job quicker than most! (2nd photo is me with instructor (RHD car) on the race track)

« Last Edit: November 09, 2021, 07:36 AM by AstroKeith »
Retired engineer/scientist

Offline jaguar36

  • Posts: 247
    • Toolamanjaro.com
Re: Cars for woodworkers
« Reply #46 on: November 09, 2021, 11:47 AM »
Tesla Model S, huge amount of room in trunk and frunk for tools and such.  Can fit 10' long boards with the tailgate shut.  Sadly none of the car makers seem to care about carrying 4x8 sheets anymore. 

Offline ChuckS

  • Posts: 3807
Re: Cars for woodworkers
« Reply #47 on: November 09, 2021, 11:56 AM »
I have to have sheet goods delivered, but I can pick up 2.4 timber, or 3m if it bends a bit.
Systainers seem to have been designed to fit nicely in the boot.
Plus I can get to the job quicker than most! (2nd photo is me with instructor (RHD car) on the race track)


The Mustang!

In my college days in the 70s, I drove a Mustang (bought secondhand for $500 Cdn) for a few years, then resold it -- for exactly the same amount. But in those days, I was no match to another dream car of mine: the Stingway convertible. Now that I can afford a Stingway, my head says it's no longer a car suitable for me.  :'(
« Last Edit: November 09, 2021, 11:59 AM by ChuckS »

Offline AstroKeith

  • Posts: 221
Re: Cars for woodworkers
« Reply #48 on: November 09, 2021, 12:45 PM »
I have to have sheet goods delivered, but I can pick up 2.4 timber, or 3m if it bends a bit.
Systainers seem to have been designed to fit nicely in the boot.
Plus I can get to the job quicker than most! (2nd photo is me with instructor (RHD car) on the race track)


The Mustang!

In my college days in the 70s, I drove a Mustang (bought secondhand for $500 Cdn) for a few years, then resold it -- for exactly the same amount. But in those days, I was no match to another dream car of mine: the Stingway convertible. Now that I can afford a Stingway, my head says it's no longer a car suitable for me.  :'(

(We're probably similar age.) Compared with the Stingray the Mustang is quite an ordinary car. As a grandfather it suits me perfectly and gives me enough of a thrill every time I start it up. Excellent value for what you get. IMO
Retired engineer/scientist

Offline squall_line

  • Posts: 1504
Re: Cars for woodworkers
« Reply #49 on: November 09, 2021, 01:05 PM »
I rented a 2020 Mustang convertible with the ecoboost engine, and it was plenty of fun on back country two-lane roads, especially with the paddle shifter.  I don't think the same could be said of a rental-level Mustang as recently as 10 years ago.  Cars have come a LONG way in that time.

Offline Packard

  • Posts: 1529
Re: Cars for woodworkers
« Reply #50 on: November 09, 2021, 01:20 PM »
In the early 1970s a friend of mine was in the house painting business.  He used his Camaro.  He loaded the supplies in the back, but I don't remember how he carried a ladder. 

He liked the car and said it was fine for his work.

Offline Peter_C

  • Posts: 1382
Re: Cars for woodworkers
« Reply #51 on: November 09, 2021, 02:25 PM »
Most vehicles today can accept some kind of receiver hitch, and Uhaul installs a lot of them. I tend to build them myself, unless a factory hitch is available used and strong enough, sticking with a 2" receiver. Most smaller car hitches are 1 1/4", which is kinda whimpy, but for me all my hitch needs are 2".

The Harbor Freight trailer works well enough for sheet goods etc. It folds up for a small foot print, making storage in a side yard possible. Did a full remodel on a house before renting it out using a HF trailer. It hauled everything from refrigerators and stoves, all kinds of wood, bags of concrete, to debris. Who wants to haul firewood or dirt inside their vehicle? The best improvement I made to my trailer was to put E-track around the perimeter for straps (I prefer L-track but already had the E-track). The reason is because if a regular hook strap comes loose at all, it can/will unhook, leaving the load to fall off. Locked into a E or L track that is pretty much impossible. Yes straps can come loose with a load shift, it happens.


Offline leakyroof

  • Posts: 2393
Re: Cars for woodworkers
« Reply #52 on: November 09, 2021, 04:32 PM »
My Work Van, before I restored it. Handles 12 foot long inside with Rear Hatch closed and R/F seat slid off the base.
 It DID hold 4 x 8 sheets inside until I started to add cabinetry to the interior, so now full sheets go on the roof via Thule Load Bars.
 It recently took home 80 pieces of 8" wide siding, all inside the Van. Very little High Tech here to go wrong.... [wink] [wink] [wink]
Not as many Sanders as PA Floor guy.....

Offline CeeJay

  • Posts: 440
Re: Cars for woodworkers
« Reply #53 on: November 10, 2021, 12:38 AM »
I rented a 2020 Mustang convertible with the ecoboost engine, and it was plenty of fun on back country two-lane roads, especially with the paddle shifter.  I don't think the same could be said of a rental-level Mustang as recently as 10 years ago.  Cars have come a LONG way in that time.
Our non-truck vehicle was until recently the V8 Mustang convertible which I cannot recommend as a woodworking tool. Can recommend it as a waking up the neighbours tool.   

Now swapped for a BMW M2. Also not a practical workshop accessory. Also a good auditory experience.

For 6 weeks while selling the Mustang we were a 3 car family.

Here’s the 850hp garage.




Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

Offline derekcohen

  • Posts: 618
    • In The Woodshop
Re: Cars for woodworkers
« Reply #54 on: November 15, 2021, 07:04 AM »
I can get bugger all in my Boxster. But I don't care  [big grin] ... I just use my wife's run-about ...



Regards from Perth

Derek
Visit www.inthewoodshop.com for tutorials on joinery, hand tools, and my trials and tribulations with furniture builds.

Offline Rob Z

  • Posts: 1086
Re: Cars for woodworkers
« Reply #55 on: November 15, 2021, 01:00 PM »
Derek, 

That will definitely work for a run to the Home Center to buy bags of mulch and potting soil. And only $200 of diesel for the 5 mile round trip.  [scared] [big grin]


Offline rst

  • Posts: 2814
Re: Cars for woodworkers
« Reply #56 on: November 15, 2021, 01:29 PM »
Dereck, I'd be willing to bet big money that everyone stays out of her lane, all three of them.

Offline Packard

  • Posts: 1529
Re: Cars for woodworkers
« Reply #57 on: November 15, 2021, 02:49 PM »
I can get bugger all in my Boxster. But I don't care  [big grin] ... I just use my wife's run-about ...



Regards from Perth

Derek

I'm afraid you are out of luck if you want that vehicle.  Only one was built and it is out of production.  What you want is the Caterpillar 797, a big brother to the Terex.  And this one went into production.  I wonder if I can order one with an elevator built in.

Time for your wife to trade in the Terex and upgrade.   

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Terex_33-19_%22Titan%22



Offline Cheese

  • Posts: 10001
Re: Cars for woodworkers
« Reply #58 on: November 15, 2021, 11:06 PM »
So here's a shot with a Toyota in the bed...or is that a Nissan...? whatever...they're all the same.

Looks like 4 lanes wide to me.



The really interesting thing to me though is, that while there is a difference in size between the Terex and the CAT 797, the most poignant difference is the method in which they motivate.

Both companies relied on their core competence to develop these huge earth/mineral moving machines.

Terex being owned by GM at the time relied on their railroad experience, while Cat being Cat relied on their typical direct drive experience.

At the time, GM owned Terex, they also owned EMD, Electro Motive Diesel which produced trains. Their approach was to power the Terex using the diesel engine/electrical generator/traction motor method...ie...a train on rubber tires.

CAT however, relied on their direct drive capabilities, which married fuel fired power plants with torque converters and automatic transmissions. I can't help but believe the later is a more efficient method to use for rubber tired vehicles.

Thus the reason Terex produced a single vehicle while CAT continues to produce multiple 797 dump trucks.

Offline RJNeal

  • Posts: 590
Re: Cars for woodworkers
« Reply #59 on: November 16, 2021, 08:46 PM »

I thought I add my two cents.
Have you walked your saw today?