Author Topic: Swing Arm wall lamps  (Read 419 times)

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Offline mrFinpgh

  • Posts: 335
Swing Arm wall lamps
« on: November 03, 2019, 04:03 PM »
I've always liked lamps with moveable arms that cantilever out, so was excited to have the opportunity to build these.  The need came from my girlfriend's practice expanding and moving into new offices.  As you can see the office space is very sterile and uninviting, so it definitely needs more 'nice things' in it.

The basis of the design is Chris Becksvoort's plans which he published in FWW a while ago.  The globe style shade is something pretty common with some of the Danish modern lamps you find from the 60s.  I like the cord management and sturdiness of Becksvoort's design a lot, though.  Wood is curly maple and the finish is a mix of Honey Amber and Light Oak dye, sanded back and recoated, then 8 coats of french polish.  The lamps mount to the wall using tapered connectors.

The design uses a pretty small quantity of materials. I actually made 5 lamps in all, two of which I'm giving to my sister and her significant other as bedside lamps (leaving it to them to choose what to do for wire/hardware) and one of which (a prototype from some leftover soft maple) I will try to use as a worklamp.

I bought all the electrical bits from Grand Brass.

One issue I had that left me a bit uncomfortable was the inline switches.  The cloth covered wire is stranded, and the inline switch uses screw clamp terminals.  It seemed to me like no matter how securely the screws clamps down on the wire (which I twisted thoroughly), it seemed like the wire slipped out a little bit as I finished making my connections.  It still seemed to be tightly in there, but I've basically indoctrinated myself that the only good connection is a firm one.  IS this just normal for stranded wire?  Below is an illustration of the innards of the switch. Mine does not have wire with nicks in the insulation like that. :-)

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Since this forum is full of people with great design ideas, I'd welcome any ideas about what else could be done in this space.  The space is the private office area for four psychologists.

Thanks,
Adam



« Last Edit: November 03, 2019, 04:23 PM by mrFinpgh »

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Offline jobsworth

  • Posts: 5926
  • Festool Baby.....
Re: Swing Arm wall lamps
« Reply #1 on: November 03, 2019, 05:13 PM »
very nice.

 I would of never thought to make a swing arm lamp

Offline Sparktrician

  • Posts: 3838
Re: Swing Arm wall lamps
« Reply #2 on: November 03, 2019, 05:38 PM »
Suggestion re: the stranded wire.  Before assembling the wire to the switch, twist the bare ends of the wire tightly and use enough solder on the ends to hold all the wires together.  Once the solder has cooled, assemble the wires to the switch.   [smile]
- Willy -

 "Remember, a chip on the shoulder is a sure sign of wood higher up." - Brigham Young

Offline Gregor

  • Posts: 1475
Re: Swing Arm wall lamps
« Reply #3 on: November 03, 2019, 07:31 PM »
Nice design.

One issue I had that left me a bit uncomfortable was the inline switches.  The cloth covered wire is stranded, and the inline switch uses screw clamp terminals.  It seemed to me like no matter how securely the screws clamps down on the wire (which I twisted thoroughly), it seemed like the wire slipped out a little bit as I finished making my connections.  It still seemed to be tightly in there, but I've basically indoctrinated myself that the only good connection is a firm one.  IS this just normal for stranded wire?  Below is an illustration of the innards of the switch. Mine does not have wire with nicks in the insulation like that. :-)
End sleeve for strands exist for a reason, I suggest you get some and a good crimp tool (links are no endorsement but examples for clarification, the hex crimpers are IMHO better than the square ones).

Quote
Since this forum is full of people with great design ideas, I'd welcome any ideas about what else could be done in this space.  The space is the private office area for four psychologists.
Pinball machine? (M.A.M.E. with RPi4) arcade cabinet?
That's what I always put into the staff room at Theme Hospital to make the doctors happy...

Or, pro tip, just ask them what would make them happy?