Author Topic: Picnic Table  (Read 1552 times)

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Offline Birdhunter

  • Posts: 2881
  • Woodworker, Sportsman, Retired
Picnic Table
« on: March 22, 2020, 05:43 PM »
I’ve been asked to build a picnic table for some young friends. Teak comes to mind, but what other woods should I consider?
Birdhunter

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Offline Bob D.

  • Posts: 1564
Re: Picnic Table
« Reply #1 on: March 22, 2020, 06:08 PM »
I guess it depends partly on what the budget is and what's available in your area.
Cedar might be a good choice. I built an outdoor chair with it 10 years ago and it's
still with us and in good condition. It needs another coat of stain this Spring but
other than that it's held up well.
-----
It's a table saw, do you know where your fingers are?

Online Cheese

  • Posts: 7001
Re: Picnic Table
« Reply #2 on: March 22, 2020, 06:25 PM »
Have you priced teak lately...I think you’ll be stunned.

Offline Sparktrician

  • Posts: 3883
Re: Picnic Table
« Reply #3 on: March 22, 2020, 06:38 PM »
You might want to consider composite decking materials like Lumberock.  It's pretty much weather-proof and won't crack over time. 
- Willy -

 "Remember, a chip on the shoulder is a sure sign of wood higher up." - Brigham Young

Offline Birdhunter

  • Posts: 2881
  • Woodworker, Sportsman, Retired
Re: Picnic Table
« Reply #4 on: March 22, 2020, 07:34 PM »
I’ve used the composite wood and it seems to be indestructible. Cedar is far prettier. Does cedar need to be treated?
Birdhunter

Offline Alanbach

  • Posts: 533
Re: Picnic Table
« Reply #5 on: March 22, 2020, 11:27 PM »
Cypress or Mahoghany (if you are going to consider Teak you may as well look at Mahoghany as well).

Offline ultane

  • Posts: 42
Re: Picnic Table
« Reply #6 on: March 22, 2020, 11:54 PM »
Is teak available in the US?
I might be wrong… Just ask my X...

Offline Bob D.

  • Posts: 1564
Re: Picnic Table
« Reply #7 on: March 23, 2020, 05:29 AM »
Is teak available in the US?

Yes, at least it used to be. There was a place in NJ on Rt 73 not far from Philly that sold teak.
I haven't bought from them in over 10 years so I don't know if they are still in business.

Here's what I have on them (sorry, I don't have a phone):

Global Teak
530 S Route 73, Hammonton, NJ 08037
-----
It's a table saw, do you know where your fingers are?

Offline ultane

  • Posts: 42
Re: Picnic Table
« Reply #8 on: March 23, 2020, 08:13 AM »
Is teak available in the US?

Yes, at least it used to be. There was a place in NJ on Rt 73 not far from Philly that sold teak.
I haven't bought from them in over 10 years so I don't know if they are still in business.

Here's what I have on them (sorry, I don't have a phone):

Global Teak
530 S Route 73, Hammonton, NJ 08037
Google Maps says that they are permanently closed.
I might be wrong… Just ask my X...

Offline kcufstoidi

  • Posts: 877
Re: Picnic Table
« Reply #9 on: March 23, 2020, 08:19 AM »
I’ve been asked to build a picnic table for some young friends. Teak comes to mind, but what other woods should I consider?

White Oak and Black Locust are rot resistant. Ipe or other SA hardwoods used for decking are others.

Offline Thompmd

  • Posts: 40
Re: Picnic Table
« Reply #10 on: March 23, 2020, 08:29 AM »
Local restaurant did their outside patio area with Live Edge Walnut coated in some type of clear poly, really neat and they also used for bar tops and table tops(std table not picnic) and they still look great after a few years . I thought if they would hold up in a commercial situation they would at home. I keep saying I’m going to build one but haven’t got to it yet..
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Offline Sparktrician

  • Posts: 3883
Re: Picnic Table
« Reply #11 on: March 23, 2020, 08:42 AM »
I’ve used the composite wood and it seems to be indestructible. Cedar is far prettier. Does cedar need to be treated?

Pretty, it's not, but it sure is durable, especially if there are kids involved. 
- Willy -

 "Remember, a chip on the shoulder is a sure sign of wood higher up." - Brigham Young

Online Cheese

  • Posts: 7001
Re: Picnic Table
« Reply #12 on: March 23, 2020, 09:11 AM »
Here are the prices that a local wood supplier is charging and he's cheaper than anyone else around here. Prices are for 4/4 lumber by the board foot.

White oak = $4.50
Western cedar = $3.20
Cypress = $6.80
Ipe = $11.50
Philippine mahogany = $6.80
Honduran mahogany = $13.70
Teak = $27.30

The prices from the local Woodcraft store are $2 to $6 per bd ft higher.

Offline Birdhunter

  • Posts: 2881
  • Woodworker, Sportsman, Retired
Re: Picnic Table
« Reply #13 on: March 23, 2020, 09:12 AM »
There are two youngsters, 2 and 4.
Birdhunter

Offline Birdhunter

  • Posts: 2881
  • Woodworker, Sportsman, Retired
Re: Picnic Table
« Reply #14 on: March 23, 2020, 09:14 AM »
Since I am doing the work and eating the cost, the cedar looks the best. Thanks for the pricing info.
Birdhunter

Offline Bob D.

  • Posts: 1564
Re: Picnic Table
« Reply #15 on: March 23, 2020, 10:35 AM »

Google Maps says that they are permanently closed.

Too bad, they had a warehouse full. Thousands of BF. But as I said that was about 10 years ago.
-----
It's a table saw, do you know where your fingers are?

Offline jeffinsgf

  • Retailer
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  • Posts: 229
Re: Picnic Table
« Reply #16 on: March 23, 2020, 10:38 AM »
Even ten years ago, if they had a warehouse full of teak, they're retired on a tropical island somewhere.  8)

Offline ultane

  • Posts: 42
Re: Picnic Table
« Reply #17 on: March 23, 2020, 10:47 AM »

Google Maps says that they are permanently closed.

Too bad, they had a warehouse full. Thousands of BF. But as I said that was about 10 years ago.
Someone, somewhere, perhaps one of my boat building friends, told me about ten of fifteen years ago, that there was a ban on importing Teak from the main source (somewhere in the pacific?). I think most have switched to IPE(sp?).
I might be wrong… Just ask my X...

Offline jeffinsgf

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  • Posts: 229
Re: Picnic Table
« Reply #18 on: March 23, 2020, 11:08 AM »
Birdhunter,

Ipe might be your best choice if you're looking for weather-hardiness in a natural product. I have an ipe table and chair set (purchased, not built by me) that looks great. My sister has an ipe deck that has been in place for close to 20 years. It could stand refinishing, but it is as stable as ever.

Offline Birdhunter

  • Posts: 2881
  • Woodworker, Sportsman, Retired
Re: Picnic Table
« Reply #19 on: March 23, 2020, 11:39 AM »
I built 10 outdoor Ipe benches years ago for my club. They are all gray, but untouched by weather or bugs after all these years. Good stuff, but difficult to obtain.
Birdhunter

Online Cheese

  • Posts: 7001
Re: Picnic Table
« Reply #20 on: March 23, 2020, 11:51 AM »
Not mentioned but worth mentioning is redwood. My father and I built a redwood deck that lasted for 30+ years.

Be careful where you place a cedar table. My neighbor & I constructed a cedar fence about 6-8 years ago that was underneath a large tree. I noticed this spring the entire length of the fence under the tree has rotted out and will need to be replaced.

Here's an interesting article on wood for outside projects.

https://www.woodmagazine.com/materials-guide/lumber/outdoor-lumber

Offline Michael Kellough

  • Posts: 4609
Re: Picnic Table
« Reply #21 on: March 23, 2020, 12:00 PM »
While reading an article at NYTimes.com an ad for Robi Decking appeared. Never heard of them but they specialize in North America native species that are particularly durable like black locust, sassafras, and eastern juniper. They also sell black walnut but it’s not for ground contact.

They stock it in normal dimensions including 2x and also do custom milling.

Decking material comparison chart.

Offline Michael Kellough

  • Posts: 4609
Re: Picnic Table
« Reply #22 on: March 23, 2020, 12:06 PM »
@Birdhunter since you’re in Atlanta, regionally sourced cypress would be interesting.
I’ve never worked with it so I’d first investigate whether it gets splintery.

Offline Birdhunter

  • Posts: 2881
  • Woodworker, Sportsman, Retired
Re: Picnic Table
« Reply #23 on: March 23, 2020, 12:12 PM »
I think Carlton’s would be a good source if they have not closed for the virus.
Birdhunter

Offline Alanbach

  • Posts: 533
Re: Picnic Table
« Reply #24 on: March 23, 2020, 11:28 PM »
If you know of any small to medium sized saw mills out in the country in Georgia or Alabama you might get lucky and find some cheap locally harvested Cypress. I know that it’s big in Louisiana, Mississippi and Alabama so I bet it grows in Georgia as well.

Online Cheese

  • Posts: 7001
Re: Picnic Table
« Reply #25 on: March 23, 2020, 11:42 PM »
If I was in your neck of the woods, I'd definitely be looking at the cypress. Although white oak has been a staple for boat builders for years.

Cedar, while least expensive would be my last choice. The majority of the expense in building a table is the time involved. It's something to cherish for the young-uns when you've been summoned to the last roundup.   [smile]

Offline jeffinsgf

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  • Posts: 229
Re: Picnic Table
« Reply #26 on: March 24, 2020, 06:45 AM »
Briefly mentioned earlier was sassafras. It's not common, but where you can find it, it is usually very reasonably priced. I built a side table for my grill with it and it's held up well (however, I bring it inside in the winter). I mention it because you said you were eating the cost and I paid less than $2 a board foot for both 4/4 and 6/4 sassasfras from Keim Lumber in Ohio. You might find it close to you for something close to that, though I think most harvest-sized growth is north of you. It's clear, straight grained and works well. Very knowledgeable woodworkers have mistaken my finished pieces as being made from ash...until you pick it up. It is relatively light compared to ash, oak, maple, etc.

Offline bruegf

  • Posts: 798
  • Michigan
Re: Picnic Table
« Reply #27 on: March 24, 2020, 06:54 AM »
For anyone in the south bend, in area I have over 500 bd ft of teak shorts (3, 4, and 5 ft long; 4/4 and 8/4) that I'd be willing to sell for $18 bd/ft if anyone is interested.  PM me if you are.

Fred
Fred

Offline rvieceli

  • Posts: 1120
Re: Picnic Table
« Reply #28 on: March 24, 2020, 08:38 AM »
@Birdhunter seriously consider black locust. It's an American wood. Extremely resistant to rot, You may be able to find a source from a local mill. If not these folks are in North Carolina and ship everywhere.

www.robidecking.com

Ron

Offline Rick Herrick

  • Posts: 92
Re: Picnic Table
« Reply #29 on: March 24, 2020, 11:42 PM »
seriously consider black locust. It's an American wood. Extremely resistant to rot, You may be able to find a source from a local mill. If not these folks are in North Carolina and ship everywhere.

www.robidecking.com

Ron

These people are 15 minutes from me.  I need to check them out.  Thanks.