Author Topic: New Door  (Read 6844 times)

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Offline KBJ

  • Posts: 39
New Door
« on: January 04, 2016, 09:41 PM »
So I'm trying to start the new year off with a bang and finish some projects I've been slowly working on when time allowed. This is the first one I finished. I saw a door I liked on Houzz and basically just made my own version.
The stiles, rails and panel frames are made of Rift Cut White oak which I bought rough and milled straight and to dimensions myself. The panels are (2) 1/4" Rift white oak veneered on MDF laminated together. (because I had it on-hand and figured I'd rather use it then buy more).   The stiles and rails are 2 pieces glued together with opposing grain to hopefully resist any twisting, warping etc. It's an interior door in So-cal so it hardy ever rains, gets humid, or anything else, so I think it will be fine. ;) 

Construction is (2) 14x140 Dominos per joint.  I tried a technique I saw in a video of using the 2200 with a slot cutter to route the slots for the panels with the door all clamped up. Like most things you see on-line... It looked easier when someone else was doing it! I unfortunately was so nervous about messing it up that I was death gripping the router and didn't keep it flat and ended up destroying a stile. So I remade that.... Then with it all clamped up I marked start and endpoints on the stiles for each panel and modified the technique by just routing each area one at a time. then stood them on edge and scared the ends of each slot with the OF1010 and an edge guide. That actually went quite quickly and worked perfectly.  I wouldn't hesitate to do it that way again, or just do traditional dado the whole stile and make tenons on the rails in addition to Dominos. It was nice not worrying about cutting tenons though. 

I used a Woodhaven jig and the OF1010 for the hinge mortises on both the door and jamb and it worked awesome!  I just used a story stick on the door, took it to the jamb, put a spacer on top, marked the jam, clamped the jib and routed away. Absolutely perfect mortises on the door and jamb.

I used my tracksaw to trim the bottom of the door and the latch side and put a 2 degree bevel on it.

I plan on doing a Ceruse (or limed) finish, so we still need to decide on a dye color.  We are trying to find a door handle to match the other originals in the house (from the 40's) so I haven't drilled and mortised for that yet. 

I plan on adding onto the garage for more shop space, but as it is now I basically setup a workshop in the driveway or backyard to work. So I feel like I'm always doing millwork on a jobsite and not in the shop.  However that face has also made me put together some nice mobile solutions. So when I do work away from home... I still feel like I'm at home!

I'll throw in a bonus pic of my custom MFT3 based table I built. I can't take credit for the idea as I combined a lot of other people's ideas/workstations that I've seen on here and made my own. I do like with the 80/20 I can just keep adding sections and improvements to make it do whatever I need! 
« Last Edit: January 04, 2016, 09:43 PM by KBJ »

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Offline Iceclimber

  • Posts: 504
Re: New Door
« Reply #1 on: January 04, 2016, 10:34 PM »
Nice....
Kapex, MFT/3, MFT, CMS VL, 1400, TS75, Carvex420, CXS, DTS 400, Midi, CT36, RO90 and a bunch of other little junk and accessories it would be nuts to get into listing..

Offline Thebesciak

  • Posts: 83
Re: New Door
« Reply #2 on: January 04, 2016, 10:35 PM »
Door look amazing, I may copy your design in the future [cool]

I like your table also, do you have a parts list for the frame? especially about the folding legs mechanism.
greetz
P



Offline ear3

  • Posts: 4200
Re: New Door
« Reply #3 on: January 04, 2016, 10:38 PM »
Good work.  Just curious why you used the table saw jig to joint the edge rather than the tracksaw?

Also, what kind of bandsaw is that?  Looks fairly compact, yet apparently capable of resawing some wide timber.  I need something that fits that bill.
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Offline KBJ

  • Posts: 39
Re: New Door
« Reply #4 on: January 05, 2016, 01:55 AM »
Door look amazing, I may copy your design in the future [cool]

I like your table also, do you have a parts list for the frame? especially about the folding legs mechanism.
greetz
P

Thanks, Copy away.  I don't have a specific parts list for the table. I designed in my head and ordered the parts I needed. But, here are the brackets for the legs that I used.  8020 Part Num: 4339 and 4348
8020 Leg bracket

The rest is just extrusion, 90 degree brackets, adjustable feet, and hardware.  I will warn you it's not the budget option. I'm pretty sure and MFT3 is cheaper. But I wanted something I could keep expanding. The extrusion itself isn't bad, it's the brackets and other hardware that really start adding up quickly. I also have a pretty good amount of metal fab stuff in my shop. So while absolutely not necessary it's easy for me to put that stuff together. I can square all of the ends on the Mill etc.  Though you could easily build everything there with a chop saw and non-ferrous blade.   I really like the 8020 extrusion, it's easy to build solid cool stuff!

Offline KBJ

  • Posts: 39
Re: New Door
« Reply #5 on: January 05, 2016, 02:06 AM »
Good work.  Just curious why you used the table saw jig to joint the edge rather than the tracksaw?

Also, what kind of bandsaw is that?  Looks fairly compact, yet apparently capable of resawing some wide timber.  I need something that fits that bill.

Honestly, I used the table saw jig over the tracksaw because I already had it, and it's really quick to clamp wood in, straighten one edge of everything, with the jig and run the straight side against the fence for two parallel edges.  Much quicker than getting out my long rail, saw, CT36 etc. Mostly just the path of least resistance!

The bandsaw is the infamous Harbor Freight 14"  bandsaw with a grizzly riser kit, cool blocks, and maybe a timber wolf blade (I can't remember at the moment!) Anyway, the blade is great!  The saw itself is fine. I've used big adult bandsaws and they are not surprisingly much nicer. But for what I do and the footprint it takes up it works fine.  I know some people have gotten it tuned well enough to slice veneer.... mine is definitely not that well tuned currently. Though honestly I've never really even tried to do anything that delicate with it.  I mostly use for resawing exactly like that. Then Run stuff through the planer for final sizing.  It cuts pretty true, usually any problems I have are my fault not the saw's.   When I mentioned that I screwed up the stile with the router, I was able to resaw the stile right down the glue line, and re-use half of it to make a new stile. So that's not too shabby I suppose.  It's also got the Kreg fence on it which works pretty well.  At the end of the day I've gotten way more use out of it than what it cost.

Offline Cheese

  • Posts: 8342
Re: New Door
« Reply #6 on: January 05, 2016, 09:45 AM »
Nice job...the door looks great. I'm very interested in how the ceruse finish comes out. What colors are you considering?

The 8020 stuff is really nice, but it does add up rather quickly. Just curious why you used wood rather than aluminum for the router sled, as you mentioned you have metal fab capabilities?

Offline KBJ

  • Posts: 39
Re: New Door
« Reply #7 on: January 05, 2016, 12:47 PM »
Nice job...the door looks great. I'm very interested in how the ceruse finish comes out. What colors are you considering?

The 8020 stuff is really nice, but it does add up rather quickly. Just curious why you used wood rather than aluminum for the router sled, as you mentioned you have metal fab capabilities?

We want to keep it close to natural color, just a little darker.

I was thinking about adding 8020 sections perpendicular and under the fixed side rails but more like 4' wide then have a wider sled which would allow me to do nice wide boards like slabs. So it's current form was a Proof of concept. Plus I really wanted to get going flattening the walnut for my Dining table and the parts you see is what was in the shop.

Offline Thebesciak

  • Posts: 83
Re: New Door
« Reply #8 on: January 05, 2016, 02:11 PM »
thx for the info,

I like MFT but MFT is to small for me, I have table top (double size of mft) already and what I will add is the base and the legs,



Door look amazing, I may copy your design in the future [cool]

I like your table also, do you have a parts list for the frame? especially about the folding legs mechanism.
greetz
P

Thanks, Copy away.  I don't have a specific parts list for the table. I designed in my head and ordered the parts I needed. But, here are the brackets for the legs that I used.  8020 Part Num: 4339 and 4348
8020 Leg bracket

The rest is just extrusion, 90 degree brackets, adjustable feet, and hardware.  I will warn you it's not the budget option. I'm pretty sure and MFT3 is cheaper. But I wanted something I could keep expanding. The extrusion itself isn't bad, it's the brackets and other hardware that really start adding up quickly. I also have a pretty good amount of metal fab stuff in my shop. So while absolutely not necessary it's easy for me to put that stuff together. I can square all of the ends on the Mill etc.  Though you could easily build everything there with a chop saw and non-ferrous blade.   I really like the 8020 extrusion, it's easy to build solid cool stuff!

Offline Owego

  • Posts: 117
Re: New Door
« Reply #9 on: January 05, 2016, 02:33 PM »
KBJ,  Would you describe your assemble process. I've done similar assemblies but they've been a bit of a panic to get together  before the glue sets. 

Tom

Offline KBJ

  • Posts: 39
Re: New Door
« Reply #10 on: January 10, 2016, 02:56 AM »
KBJ,  Would you describe your assemble process. I've done similar assemblies but they've been a bit of a panic to get together  before the glue sets. 

Tom

I wish I had a magical secret solution for you, but honestly.... It's work fast!  Everything had been pre-fited and assembled. When assembled and clamped it went together very square.  I did pre-glue one end of all the dominos into the stiles. Then all I had to worry about was getting glue on the other half of the Dominos and the edges where the rails met. Since it was a quick accurate fit up, glue up went easily.  Hope that helps a little!

Offline tom46

  • Posts: 89
Re: New Door
« Reply #11 on: February 11, 2016, 06:08 PM »
Nice job looks great. [big grin]

So are the stiles and rails grooved to fit the panels and beading in too?

Offline KBJ

  • Posts: 39
Re: New Door
« Reply #12 on: February 12, 2016, 08:12 PM »
Yep. I plowed a groove in the rails and Stiles for the panels and the detail inset pieces.
I made the complete center panels up first and made a sandwich of the laminated MDF and the "picture frame"??? around it. I figured it would be easier to get all of the pieces the exact size and with perfect miters.  Seemed to work pretty well. They're all glued and I shot brads to hold them in place while the glue dries and they're hidden in the grooves.

Offline tom46

  • Posts: 89
Re: New Door
« Reply #13 on: February 14, 2016, 05:48 AM »
Oh i see, great way to make it. Very effective [smile]

Offline Bugsysiegals

  • Posts: 815
Re: New Door
« Reply #14 on: February 04, 2021, 02:32 PM »
@KBJ ... How did you setup your pivoting legs so there's no support bracket on the exterior of the table?  Did you simply remove it in order to slide your router jig into the t-slot and will then replace the bracket?

Offline Jasonj888

  • Posts: 120
    • Blog about woodworking and family life.
Re: New Door
« Reply #15 on: February 12, 2021, 02:42 PM »
Looks great, but I'm mostly in envy of your weather seeing your things set up outside. Right now, at 1:41 p.m. in North Dakota it's -8. Feels like -28 with the wind, not hyperbole, but from the weather service.

Offline Yardbird

  • Posts: 135
Re: New Door
« Reply #16 on: February 12, 2021, 03:08 PM »
Looks great, but I'm mostly in envy of your weather seeing your things set up outside. Right now, at 1:41 p.m. in North Dakota it's -8. Feels like -28 with the wind, not hyperbole, but from the weather service.

So that would be about -22 degrees Celsius and windchill -33 degrees Celsius.   

Offline Crazyraceguy

  • Posts: 300
Re: New Door
« Reply #17 on: February 12, 2021, 07:15 PM »
KBJ,  Would you describe your assemble process. I've done similar assemblies but they've been a bit of a panic to get together  before the glue sets. 

Tom
I usually switch to  slower setting glue to get some more time and reduce the stress. Franklin (the Tite Bond people) makes a hide glue that works straight from the bottle, rather than heating. Not only is it slower, it also doesn't swell the wood fibers, so things go together well too.
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