Author Topic: Harlequin side table  (Read 3932 times)

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Offline derekcohen

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Harlequin side table
« on: June 02, 2019, 11:20 AM »
My wife requested a side table for the family room. This will be situated between two arm chairs, and replace the small table (which is too high and dominating) ...



Not just a side table, but it also needed to house her needlework thingies. In other words, shallow drawers for cotton reels and sewing kit. I played around with several ideas, and eventually came up with a design that borrows a little from a piece I recently made.

Lynndy liked the softness of the rounded dovetails and overall dimension of this coffee table I built some months back for a nephew ...



The plan (looking down) would be to create a curved front and back, with round, splayed legs to the outside (an alternative is a straight, tapered round leg) ...



In contrast to the Jarrah in that piece, the carcase will be built in Hard Maple, dovetailed and mitred at each corner. It will feature 8 drawers. All drawer fronts will curve as well. The reason for "Harlequin" in the title is that the drawers will be a mix of woods, as depicted in the elevation of the drawer section ...



A harlequin design is often thought of as a diamond pattern, but does also include a rectangular checkerboard. Anyway, it's just a name, and I like giving my pieces a name :)

At this stage I have chosen for the drawer fronts Black Walnut and Blue Gum. I may also add in Hard Maple. Always interested in your thoughts here. The Blue Gum is lighter than the Black Walnut and is a good foil against the Hard Maple …



The legs will taper and curve from the carcase, attached with a loose mortice and tenon ...



The sides and top were arranged so that the grain flowed continuously. The carcase is 20mm thick, 800mm long and 350 at the wide, centre point ..



The initial dovetail plan was to keep the boards parallel and saw the curves later. It became apparent when joining the first set that this would not work ...



.. there would be too much at the sides to mitre, and so I decided to shape the top and bottom panels at this stage rather than later.





This was the first opportunity to use the modification I made to my Moxon vise (see article: http://www.inthewoodshop.com/ShopMadeTools/NewMoxonMods.html). It now enables the pin- and tail boards to be clamped together to aid in marking out (see earlier photo).

In marking out for mitred corners, the side tails are not sawn out from the front ...



... the board is reversed, and the mitres are marked ...



... and sawn ...



The reason I had wanted to retain square carcase sides was that it would make it easier to square the chisel guide for the mitres. I got around this by squaring them to the front of the carcase ...



The pin board is seen here ...



One of the difficulties in fitting this many tails and pins is that any slight errors are magnified. The fit below illustrates that the left side is too tight ...



To deal with this, the tails were given a pencil scribbling ...



Fitting the board together left this behind ...



This process needed to be done once more, before the fit was satisfactory ...



The four sides were dry fitted together, and the front and rear upper and lower panels planed to shape (this was close but not enough)  …



All is coplanar …

 

Where we are up to at the end of today …

   

One set of mitred corners …



… and the other …

   

Next up is building the internal dividers for the drawers.

Regards from Perth

Derek

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Offline jobsworth

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Re: Harlequin side table
« Reply #1 on: June 02, 2019, 11:46 AM »
very nice work. Ive always wanted to learn how to do hand cut dovetails.

Offline Jiggy Joiner

  • Posts: 785
Re: Harlequin side table
« Reply #2 on: June 02, 2019, 12:11 PM »
I love seeing real craftsmanship, and this is a lovely example.
I remember doing my apprenticeship, we spent weeks learning dovetails, I still find them beautiful, even more so when hand cut.
Superb work  [thumbs up]

Offline neilc

  • Posts: 2742
Re: Harlequin side table
« Reply #3 on: June 02, 2019, 12:49 PM »
Derek - your work is definitely 'next level' in design and craftsmanship.

Great design.  My wife does a lot of needlework, so I'm paying attention!

neil

Offline RKA

  • Posts: 1751
Re: Harlequin side table
« Reply #4 on: June 02, 2019, 08:35 PM »
“Next level” was exactly the phrase that popped into my mind as I scrolled through the pictures.  I love how unique your projects are! 
-Raj

Offline George Oliver

  • Posts: 38
Re: Harlequin side table
« Reply #5 on: June 02, 2019, 10:08 PM »
I really appreciate the effort you put into photojournaling your work. Looks great.

Offline derekcohen

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Re: Harlequin side table
« Reply #6 on: June 02, 2019, 11:54 PM »
George, these photos were taken hand held with a iPhone 6. Then cropped with Photoshop Elements 12. Really basic stuff.

Thanks all for the kind words. Lots more to come.

Regards from Perth

Derek

Offline derekcohen

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Re: Harlequin side table
« Reply #7 on: June 03, 2019, 11:38 AM »
With the carcase completed, it is time to turn to the internal dividers for the drawers.

I took the time first to plane the rebate for the rear panel. Knowing my spatial weakness of getting parts back-to-front and upside-down, I marked these when the carcase was a dry fit  (and later briefly thought I had screwed this up!) ...



One of the benefits of mitred corners is that the rebate can be planed across without fear of it showing ...





The rebate is 6mm deep as the rear panel will be 5mm thick to bend it around the curved rear. The carcase is 20mm thick, and the rebate extends halfway into this.

I was curious to see how rebating on a curve would turn out. No problem ...





Here is the rear of the carcase with the rebate ...





Moving to the stopped dados/housings ... the centre panel is solid rather than a frame. I decided that this would be less work, plus there will be a series of stopped dados to be made. The panel is 10mm thick. This was made first, that is, the dados were sized to fit the panel thickness.

I made up a couple of templates. One was the height of the dado, and the other was the height of the dado plus the width of the dado. The inside of the carcase is marked on both sides using the same templates to ensure that they are exactly the same height from the base.



The lines are deepened with a knife, and then a chisel wall is created to register a saw cut ...



The end of the stopped dado is defined ...



A Japanese azebiki was used along a guide to ensure it cut on the vertical ...



Now that the sides are defined by the kerf, this could be deepened with a chisel (this is my favourite chisel - a 1" Kiyohisa. Sublime!) ..



The waste is removed with a router plane ...



Check that the side walls are square ...



Completed side panels ...



I was so confident that the dados were perfect that I dry fitted the carcase once more ... and then found that one dado was a smidgeon too tight for the test piece. It turned out that a small section of a side wall was not as square as I thought (probably the saw did not cut deeply enough at that spot). The best too to clear this is a side rebate plane. Set for a very light cut to clear the waste, not the dado width ...



Perfect fit this time ...



Time to fit the centre panel. This has been shaped to size, but will need a little fine tuning at a later time. Note that the rear section is secondary wood (Merbau) ...



I had just enough time to slide the panel in. Nice tight fit. Not enough time to saw the rebates for the stopped dados. This will be done next time ...



Regards from Perth

Derek

Offline Jamie_MA

  • Posts: 49
Re: Harlequin side table
« Reply #8 on: June 03, 2019, 09:40 PM »
As always, beautiful work Derek! Thanks for sharing!

Online Cheese

  • Posts: 6455
Re: Harlequin side table
« Reply #9 on: June 04, 2019, 12:13 PM »
Nice stuff Derek...I'll be watching this build for sure. [big grin]

Was also very interested in your Moxon vise modifications. The hinged rear ledge is a clever solution to a common problem.

http://www.inthewoodshop.com/ShopMadeTools/NewMoxonMods.html

I also liked the removable alignment fence. What adhesive did you use to join the steel angle and the wood?

Offline derekcohen

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Re: Harlequin side table
« Reply #10 on: June 04, 2019, 12:39 PM »
Hi Cheese ... thanks.

The steel angle and wood were joined with a little epoxy.

Regards from Perth

Derek

Offline Birdhunter

  • Posts: 2685
  • Woodworker, Sportsman, Retired
Re: Harlequin side table
« Reply #11 on: June 05, 2019, 09:06 PM »
Wonderful work!

Question. How does the design accommodate seasonal wood movement?
Birdhunter

Offline derekcohen

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Re: Harlequin side table
« Reply #12 on: June 06, 2019, 01:53 AM »
BH, wood moves across the grain. This means that the dividing panels will move towards the rear of the cabinet. No harm done :)

Regards from Perth

Derek

Offline derekcohen

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Re: Harlequin side table
« Reply #13 on: June 10, 2019, 11:21 AM »
The Harlequin side table will have 8 drawers. The drawer case sides and the central drawer blade are panels and run in dados or housings (depending on which side of the pond you live). Positioning of these dados is critical since any misalignment will affect the aesthetic. It goes without saying (but I shall) that the alignment also determines that the side panels will be square ... and drawers need to run against square sides. All this is done here with hand tools.

Some of the finer points in getting it precise ...

First of all, templates (or story sticks) are created to position the dados. There are two for each side panel: the second is 10mm longer than the first. Scoring each creates an exact 10mm dado. There is a series of templates to position all the dados. This ensures that the upper and the lower dado are position exactly the same distance from the reference wall ...





A chisel wall is created for the marked outlines. This wall enables the fence to be lined up using a wide chisel ...



The sidewalls are sawn with a azebiki saw. This have two curved sides, one with coarse rip teeth and the other with fine crosscut teeth. I begin with the fine teeth and use them to establish the kerf, and then switch to to the coarse teeth for speedier sawing.



With a compass, I check that the kerf is parallel and to the desired width (10mm) ...



The sawn side wall is now chopped away close to full depth ...



This is done across the dados on one board at a time ...



The waste in the centre of each dado is removed with a router plane. The dados are done at the same time to save have to reset the depth of cut (one stroke on dado #1, one on dado #2, and one on dado #3 ... then back to #1 ...) ...



Keep an eye on the depth ...



Fine tune the dado should theoretically be unnecessary if they were marked accurately. In practice, I find that there is usually some waste in the corners, or a slightly sloped wall. For this reason I run a side rebate plane (here a Veritas), the length of each wall. This is not held vertically, since that with remove some of the width. Instead it is run at an angle away from the side wall, as it it was undercutting the side wall ...



The fit is now checked with an offcut from the side panel ...



The side rebate plane can take a smidgeon off the sidewall if the fit is too tight. Some will argue that it is preferable to plane the panel instead. In this situation that is not advisable since the panel is to slide along the dado, and a tight point will impede all points of the panel.

The carcase is Hard Maple, with Merbau as the secondary wood. Locally, Merbau is used for decking. It is cheap and hard, both qualities valued. But is a really brittle wood, and awful to work with. The number of splinters I have had ... and they are sharp and lodge deeply. Ugh!

It can look like this ...



... and then a section breaks away ...



At least it will be far inside the carcase and not be seen.

A panel is made up for the interior dividers ...





The pieces are fitted.

Will the careful planning and neurotic execution pay off?

I was holding my breath. This is a dry fit ....







(sound of breathing again)

Then I pulled it apart and glued up the carcase ...



More after the coming weekend.

Regards from Perth

Derek

Offline ear3

  • Posts: 3885
Re: Harlequin side table
« Reply #14 on: June 11, 2019, 08:15 AM »
Truly inspiring build, and really excellent discussion of the process of cutting the dadoes.  Side rabbet plane proved to be a secret weapon here I see.
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Offline derekcohen

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Re: Harlequin side table
« Reply #15 on: June 16, 2019, 11:01 AM »
We left off with the drawer dividers a dry fit in the case ...



And then this was pulled apart and the case glued up. After a clean up, the ends were looking a little tidier ...



Now we've been through this together with the Jarrah coffee table, but for those who want to know how ...

The ends are marked (with a washer) ..



The aim is the remove the waste progressively to the lines ...



This is quick to do with a low angle jack ...



.. and finish with a block plane ...



Now finish with sandpaper - 80/120/240 grit ...



The completed case ...



I spent a few hours today turning a few legs. Rather than show the prototypes, I am hoping that I may have enough time to complete them tomorrow - I have the afternoon off! :) - and then I will post more photos.

Regards from Perth

Derek

Offline Jiggy Joiner

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Re: Harlequin side table
« Reply #16 on: June 16, 2019, 05:14 PM »
Stunning!

Offline derekcohen

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Re: Harlequin side table
« Reply #17 on: June 22, 2019, 09:49 AM »
The case was completed last time ...



... but before the drawer dividers can be permanently installed, the legs need to be made and attached.

This was the original drawing ...



Some has been retained and some has been changed.

Instead of curved legs, which I later decided did not match the overall style, I decided on round, tapered legs that will splay out from the case.

Before turning the legs, the splay was created by tapering the top of the legs on the table saw. The slider uses a Fritz and Frans jig to rip the end at the chosen angle (8 degrees). This ensured that the splay angle would be the same for all legs.



The blanks were then turned to shape. Here I am checking that the near-to-finished legs are the same dimensions and have the same taper angle ...



The ends were then cut off and the top was shaped with rasps and sandpaper ...



How to attach the legs? Well, that had given me a real headache. I was thinking along the lines of a loose tenon ... overcomplicating matters (as usual). A number suggested simply glueing and screwing. I was skeptical, but of course, a glue joint alone is generally stronger than the wood ... and reason prevailed :)

There are three screws per leg, which were countersunk for the drawers. The glue chosen was Titebond III.





All cleaned up, this is what we have (drumroll) ...







The splay to the side is 8 degree, and from the sides, the legs are aligned with the front and rear of the case.



Drawers next :)

Regards from Perth

Derek

Offline Jiggy Joiner

  • Posts: 785
Re: Harlequin side table
« Reply #18 on: June 22, 2019, 02:06 PM »
Oooh I really love this piece  [thumbs up]
I know that it’s not what this thread is about but, I started thinking about the price of this would be to a customer, and I worked out that the total, would, or rather should be, a lot of money!

It really is a stunning and bespoke example, thanks for sharing the build, and look forward to the next stage  [thumbs up]

Offline Koamolly

  • Posts: 92
Re: Harlequin side table
« Reply #19 on: June 22, 2019, 05:31 PM »
Always love reading your posts.  Amazing craftsmanship.  I detect a little War of the Worlds vibe going on there. ;)

Offline mrB

  • Posts: 560
Re: Harlequin side table
« Reply #20 on: June 23, 2019, 08:34 AM »
Wow! Just discovered this thread. What beautiful design and fantastic craftsmanship. Thanks you for all the posts and photos of this build, I've really enjoyed reading this and I've definitely picked up a couple of tips. Very jealous of some of your tools too :)

Thanks for posting Derek!
there's nothing like the right tool for the job

Offline Bert Vanderveen

  • Posts: 543
Re: Harlequin side table
« Reply #21 on: June 23, 2019, 12:53 PM »
I like the concept, but there is something about the top curves of the legs that bothers me. I think those shoulders should be more pronounced, more bulging — that way the legs would appear to ‘press thru’ the cabinet in a solid curve that would connect each one to the one on the other side. (Hope you understand what I mean).

Execution flawless, as always!
Cheers, Bert Vanderveen

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Offline derekcohen

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Re: Harlequin side table
« Reply #22 on: June 24, 2019, 08:39 AM »
No problem, Bert. My designs are likely to both bother and (hopefully) delight someone. Fortunately my wife likes it.:)

Regards from Perth

Derek

Offline derekcohen

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Re: Harlequin side table
« Reply #23 on: June 24, 2019, 08:39 AM »
A frustrating Sunday: I began installing the horizontal divider/drawer blade, and my spatial confusion (or lack of concentration) kicked in. In went the divider ... upside down! Well, fortunately it jammed half-way and could not be glued in ...

Knocking it out, however, caused the rear section of the panel (it is made of three boards) to break off. It was glued back again, but the panel needed to dry before starting again, and so I lost my Sunday afternoon. This table is destined for the Perth Wood Show at the start of August, and I am already battling with time as weekends are generally all that are available for woodworking.

Fortunately, I had this afternoon (Monday) off from my practice, and had a couple of hours to try and catch up a little.

The glue dried, and the panel was fine. It was sanded to 240 grit, and then installed. Ditto the side dividers. All went smoothly ... all lined up and everything is square. Clearly I have been a good boy :)



The reason why the table is termed "Harlequin" is that the drawers will be a mix of different timbers: Black Walnut (x3), Figured Hard Maple (x2) (both from the USA), and Tasmanian Blue Gum (x3) (which is local, of course).

The drawer fronts all curve, and I spent the last part of the afternoon cutting out the Walnut blanks. This will will give you an idea of the effect ..



Unless someone is interested in a walk through in dovetailing on the curve (which I have posted here previously), the next images will be the completed table.

Regards from Perth

Derek


Offline ear3

  • Posts: 3885
Re: Harlequin side table
« Reply #24 on: June 24, 2019, 09:25 AM »
The design of the legs makes this table look simultaneously futuristic and mid-century modern.  Awesome aesthetic!
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Offline derekcohen

  • Posts: 333
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Re: Harlequin side table
« Reply #25 on: July 07, 2019, 12:19 PM »
I was planning to next post with the completed Harlequin Side table, however it has been two steps forward and one back. Selecting the drawer fronts .. well, I've cut and recut them a few times, and only now satisfied with the result. It is no small deal each time since a drawer front has to be fitted into a recess that is shaped like a parallelogram. And if the fit is not good enough ... well, a few would-be drawer fronts were discarded.

What parts are needed? Well, the drawer sides are 1/4" thick - too thin for grooves, so there will be slips to support the drawer bottom.

The drawer sides are Tasmanian Oak, which I use frequently, as it is a light wood that allows the drawer fronts to be shown to their best, and it is available quarter sawn. The drawer back will also be Tassie Oak.

The drawer bottoms are solid wood and 1/4" thick. Rather than use Tasmanian Oak, I thought I would add a little life with Tasmanian Blue Gum. It is quite similar is texture and tone (although the photos here do not show this), but has more figure.

Enough here for 8 drawers ...



Drawer sides and drawer fronts ...



Great sander ... Mirka Ceros ...



These will be the drawer bottoms. The board in the centre is the Hard Maple case back ...



Do you think anyone will notice that the drawer bottoms run sequentially? :)



The making of the drawer slips may have some interest. I used Tasmanian Blue Gum (because it links to the drawer bottoms). This is quite interlocked and any planing with a plough to form either grooves or beads would be expected to end unhappily, with much tearout. I have posted this tip before: add a 15 degree backbevel to all plough blades to create a high 60 degree cutting angle.

The 3/16" beads were ploughed with the Veritas Combination Plane ...



Brilliant finish ...



... and a 1/8" groove for the rebate in the drawer bottom was ploughed by the Veritas Small Plow ...



Again, tearout free ...





This is a mock up of the intersection of the drawer front (back), drawer side into drawer slip and against a drawer side ...



Note that the drawer front is straight/flat at this stage but, once dovetailed, they will be shaped to curve along the bow front of the case.

These are the timbers I have chosen for the drawer fronts. This is what gives the side table the harlequin name. Three timbers: Black Walnut, a pink Jarrah, and figured Hard Maple. Keep in mind that there is no finish at this stage ...





Next time hopefully with everything completed.

Regards from Perth

Derek


Offline M.A.D. Renovations

  • Posts: 23
Re: Harlequin side table
« Reply #26 on: July 10, 2019, 10:22 PM »
Outstanding work!!

Offline derekcohen

  • Posts: 333
    • In The Woodshop
Re: Harlequin side table
« Reply #27 on: July 27, 2019, 01:45 PM »
I am in the process of completing the Harlequin Table. I will post the finished piece in a couple of days. Here are a few pictures of making the drawer bottoms for the slips, which may interest a few.

Bill was not enamoured with the slips as they has this ruddy great groove down one side. That was a too-wide quirk from the beading blade. Not to worry Bill, I cut that section away, leaving just the bead.

Here are the slips being glued in ...





The drawer slips and bottoms are Tasmanian Blue Gum. The drawer sides are Tasmanian Oak. Both are 1/4" thick.

The groove in the slip is 1/8" (3mm). The slip requires a matching 1/8" rebate. This was planed with a skew rebate plane on a sticking board ...



Although the plane has a nicker, I always scribe the line as well ...



It is worth the effort to set up the rebate plane for a precise cut ...



Once the one side is done, slide the tongue into the groove of the slip, and mark off the width of the drawer bottom ...



Then saw to width ...



Any fine tuning is done with a shoulder plane ...



The drawer fronts are all curved, and the drawer bottom must be scribed to match this ...



Here is the fit behind the front of the drawer, and the match with the beaded slips ...



The rear of the drawer, with the added bearing surface from the slips ...



The profile of the drawer sides ...





Until the final pics ...

Regards from Perth

Derek

Online threesixright

  • Posts: 378
Re: Harlequin side table
« Reply #28 on: July 27, 2019, 04:47 PM »
Doubtful I will ever reach that skill level. But you made me something to aim for. Thanks! [big grin]

Absolutely stunning. Kudos to you sir. 


Sent from my X using Tapatalk

Offline ear3

  • Posts: 3885
Re: Harlequin side table
« Reply #29 on: July 27, 2019, 05:44 PM »
The small pins on the drawers are a great touch!
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