Author Topic: Gluing up speaker cabinet - 1/16” inch gap to fix - need help please.  (Read 6093 times)

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Offline sebr023

  • Posts: 45
Hi all!

Don’t know if I’m in the right section of the forum.

But I’m building some cabinet for some home theater speaker. I’ve already glued up the left and right speaker. Yesterday I glued the Center speaker.

Ive had my share of mistake on building the left and right speaker as I’m a beginner woodworker. But nothing I wasn’t able to solve or I couldnt live with.

I made a “bigger” mistake on the glue up for this cabinet. There’s a 1/16 gap on one of the edge of the cabinet.

The 100$ question: how could I save this?

A friends of mine told me that wood glue doesn’t stick to cured wood glue. 1/16 is a bit thight to go and sand/scrap cured wood glue.

If I clamp this, I am able to bring the cap tighter, but obviously I would need some glue to hold it.

The cabinet is birch plywood and I wanted them to stay that way, meaning I don’t plan on veneering them.

This is the orientation of the speaker, layed on its side.


The 1/16 gap is the middle :


2ft level to show the “bulge” (sorry lack of a better word) it causes.


If I don’t clamp and reduce the gap, the bulge will stay, and I will need to find a way to sand away the bulge, probably going through the birch veneer on the top of the plywood.
But I could pmace this face down, so it wouldn’t be a big deal I guess?!

Anyway, thank for your time and answer. Looking forward to read more advanced woodworker on this problem!

Thanks!


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Festool USA does not pre-approve the contents of this website nor endorse the application or use of any Festool product in any way other than in the manner described in the Festool Instruction Manual. To reduce the risk of serious injury and/or damage to your Festool product, always read, understand and follow all warnings and instructions in your Festool product's Instruction Manual. Although Festool strives for accuracy in the website material, the website may contain inaccuracies. Festool makes no representations about the accuracy, reliability, completeness or timeliness of the material on this website or about the results to be obtained from using the website. Festool and its affiliates cannot be responsible for improper postings or your reliance on the website's material. Your use of any material contained on this website is entirely at your own risk. The content contained on this site is provided for informational purposes only and does not constitute professional advice.


Offline Crazyraceguy

  • Posts: 2074
Is that outer "skin" glued to the core, or it just trapped in there?
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Offline sebr023

  • Posts: 45
Is that outer "skin" glued to the core, or it just trapped in there?
Not sure what you’re referring too.
Everything you see in there is glued.
The bracing inside is glued in dado I did.


Hope this answer your question.


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Offline ChuckS

  • Posts: 3978
That looks to be an easy fix to me since the glue-up has been pretty recent.

1) Put a clamp on either side to keep the top in position (shown in red on the sides)
2) Use a heat gun to soften glue in the gap (about 2 mins a time)
3) Remove as much glue as possible from the mating surfaces (spray water if needed & repeat 2)
4) Let dry
5) Apply fresh glue, and clamp everything home.
« Last Edit: October 27, 2022, 06:26 PM by ChuckS »

Offline sebr023

  • Posts: 45
That looks to be an easy fix to me since the glue-up has been pretty recent.

1) Put a clamp on either side to keep the top in position (shown in red on the sides)
2) Use a heat gun to soften glue in the gap (about 2 mins a time)
3) Remove as much as glue from the mating surface (spray water if needed & repeat 2)
4) Let dry
5) Apply fresh glue, and clamp everything home.
Thank you!
How / what would you use to removing glue in there?  Small ruler? Feeler gauge? Trying to think of something thin but relatively sturdy


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Offline ChuckS

  • Posts: 3978
My tool of choice would be a palette knife or a putty knife. Anything stiff and thin such as card scrapers can do.

Something like this (price in CDN) - https://www.leevalley.com/en-ca/shop/tools/hand-tools/knives/60274-palette-knives-for-woodworkers
« Last Edit: October 27, 2022, 07:29 PM by ChuckS »

Offline sebr023

  • Posts: 45
Gluing up speaker cabinet - 1/16” inch gap to fix - need help please.
« Reply #6 on: October 27, 2022, 08:00 PM »
My tool of choice would be a palette knife or a putty knife. Anything stiff and thin such as card scrapers can do.

Something like this (price in CDN) - https://www.leevalley.com/en-ca/shop/tools/hand-tools/knives/60274-palette-knives-for-woodworkers
Oh yeah! Makes sens! I have a small putty knife and have 2-3 pallet knife laying around!

Edit: spelling


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« Last Edit: October 27, 2022, 09:09 PM by sebr023 »

Offline sebr023

  • Posts: 45
My tool of choice would be a palette knife or a putty knife. Anything stiff and thin such as card scrapers can do.

Something like this (price in CDN) - https://www.leevalley.com/en-ca/shop/tools/hand-tools/knives/60274-palette-knives-for-woodworkers
So just tried your suggestion, I will let dry over night and try to glue back up tomorrow.

When I was applying water with a spray bottle, I saw watered down glue coming out of the joint, so I guess that’s good news!


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Offline ChuckS

  • Posts: 3978
Sounds good. Make sure the clamps stay long long enough after the regluing, and good luck!

Offline sebr023

  • Posts: 45
Sounds good. Make sure the clamps stay long long enough after the regluing, and good luck!
How long are you thinking? 12hr? 24?
I’m using basic Lepage yellow wood glue, the « pro » version I believe it’s called.


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Offline ChuckS

  • Posts: 3978
8 hours should be enough since it isn't something subject to stress.
« Last Edit: October 28, 2022, 07:02 AM by ChuckS »

Offline sebr023

  • Posts: 45
8 hours should be enough since it isn't something subject to stress.
Thank you!


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Offline sebr023

  • Posts: 45
8 hours should be enough since it isn't something subject to stress.
Update:

Used 2: 2x3 steel piece to help spread the clamp force. Got a good squeeze out.


Even on the inside I got a squeeze out:


Which make me hopeful that the glue was everywhere it needed to be so the joint can hold!


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Offline Packard

  • Posts: 1640
Just to throw a wrench in the works:  Most speaker builders use MDF as it resonates less than other sheet goods and improves the sound quality.

Offline sebr023

  • Posts: 45
Just to throw a wrench in the works:  Most speaker builders use MDF as it resonates less than other sheet goods and improves the sound quality.
It’s debatable. I’m not an expert, far from it, but there’s test out there that proved it not necessarily true.

Also, I bought the kit from CSS audio. They recommend both. Also, some other higher end speaker manufacturer uses birch ply.

I bought the 1TD for left and right and the 2TD for the Center channel. They’re very well brace for the type of speaker.

I would still be curious to see the measurement of both  speaker in MDF and birch plywood.


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Offline Vtshopdog

  • Posts: 175
Yes, MDF and Birch ply are both used. Designer usually specs the cabinet material.
Material used will change the sound characteristics, but who is to say what sounds best?

This fellow is a DIY speaker building icon of sorts and generally builds everything with BB ply
http://www.troelsgravesen.dk/Diy_Loudspeaker_Projects.htm

Even if you are just a wood nerd and not an audio nerd his site has tons of beautiful build threads and is worth a look.  He does a lot of cool variations on building what in essence are boxes.
(fair warning, if you fall in love with something on his site and want to build, a kit will set you back minimum $1k and more likely $2-4k)

LOL - Speaker building was my gateway drug to buying Festool....

Offline JimH2

  • Posts: 1180
Just to throw a wrench in the works:  Most speaker builders use MDF as it resonates less than other sheet goods and improves the sound quality.

Can we get some type of data to back up your "most" statement? Sounds anecdotal at best.

Online Cheese

  • Posts: 10166
Just to throw a wrench in the works:  Most speaker builders use MDF as it resonates less than other sheet goods and improves the sound quality.

Can we get some type of data to back up your "most" statement? Sounds anecdotal at best.

Packard is correct in that JBL has always recommended MDF because it resonates less than ply. I purchased a JBL Speaker Kit back in the early 70's. It was a 20 page assemblage of written/technical material about proper speaker construction including materials and joint construction. JBL at that time recommended MDF boxes along with lock miter joints for every corner.

I still have a pair of the original JBL L100 speakers from the 70's & the L100's are manufactured from MDF with lock miter corners.  [smile]

And then there's the Altec Voice of the Theatre speakers. They were huge but constructed from all plywood. An interesting note is that I never liked the VOT sound because I thought its treble was too strident. Did the all-plywood construction generate some of the stridency?  [popcorn]

« Last Edit: October 28, 2022, 11:15 PM by Cheese »

Offline Michael Kellough

  • Posts: 5712
@Cheese , re the JBL manual, was Baltic birch generally available as an option back then?

Online Cheese

  • Posts: 10166
@Cheese , re the JBL manual, was Baltic birch generally available as an option back then?

Not that I remember Michael, Baltic birch is a more recent thing. I just remember the MDF recommendation because that really surprised me. But then again after a little thought, it made sense because at the time the larger Wharfedale speakers were being filled with sand to dampen the resonances.

Offline sebr023

  • Posts: 45
We could speak of speaker design for a long while! There’s so many variables. Even with the filling in the speaker: egg crate foam, rock wool, jeans wool, etc. Each has their properties.


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Offline sebr023

  • Posts: 45
Gluing up speaker cabinet - 1/16” inch gap to fix - need help please.
« Reply #21 on: October 28, 2022, 04:49 PM »
Yes, MDF and Birch ply are both used. Designer usually specs the cabinet material.
Material used will change the sound characteristics, but who is to say what sounds best?

This fellow is a DIY speaker building icon of sorts and generally builds everything with BB ply
http://www.troelsgravesen.dk/Diy_Loudspeaker_Projects.htm

Even if you are just a wood nerd and not an audio nerd his site has tons of beautiful build threads and is worth a look.  He does a lot of cool variations on building what in essence are boxes.
(fair warning, if you fall in love with something on his site and want to build, a kit will set you back minimum $1k and more likely $2-4k)

LOL - Speaker building was my gateway drug to buying Festool....
If you have time look up the criton kit, didn’t hear them yet as their being build, but from the reviews I saw, their pretty good.

It already set me back 1.5k cad. And I don’t even have the 5 bed layer speaker. And I’m aware that nothing in the world of speaker/speaker building.

I will take a look at your link!


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« Last Edit: October 28, 2022, 04:59 PM by sebr023 »

Offline Vtshopdog

  • Posts: 175

And then there's the EV Voice of the Theatre speakers. They were huge but constructed from all plywood. An interesting note is that I never liked the VOT sound because I thought its treble was too strident. Did the all-plywood construction generate some of the stridency?  [popcorn]

Cheese, tweeters are usually not real dependent on the cabinet, most all of them are little self sealed enclosures and the driver cone (or ribbon) generally does not interact with the speaker box very much.  Tweeter on most designs has a resistor somewhere in the crossover to attenuate the raw signal, a higher value resistor might have produced sound more to your liking.

For ply vs MDF my understanding is BB does have a higher frequency natural resonance than MDF but probably will manifest more in the upper bass and mid ranges than treble.  Think of the clatter a dropped piece of ply makes vs thunk of dropped MDF.  Realistically the crossover and cabinet designs plus construction will dominate the sound characteristics and material will be secondary as long as box is rigid and well braced.

Disclaimer:
All my above spew should be taken with a grain of salt as this is one of those topics where the more you learn the less you know.

EDIT:
Were the VOT's horn type speakers in the vein of Klipsch?  If that's the case then material might be very primary in sound.
« Last Edit: October 28, 2022, 07:10 PM by Vtshopdog »

Offline sebr023

  • Posts: 45
Gluing up speaker cabinet - 1/16” inch gap to fix - need help please.
« Reply #23 on: October 28, 2022, 09:58 PM »


EDIT:
Were the VOT's horn type speakers in the vein of Klipsch?  If that's the case then material might be very primary in sound.
[/quote]


I don’t know about the VOT, but the klipsch are often called having a “cold” sound because of their tweeter or very toward sounding in the upper frequency range!


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Online Cheese

  • Posts: 10166
Were the VOT's horn type speakers in the vein of Klipsch?  If that's the case then material might be very primary in sound.

Yes, a large 2-way horn & woofer system.

I said the treble was strident but probably more correctly it was the upper mid-range frequencies that bothered me.

A typical 60's/70's VOT speaker.






Offline Bohdan

  • Posts: 1023
Altec Lansing A7 "Voice of the Theatre" a good choice to get the music volume above the noise of a wood working shop.

Online Cheese

  • Posts: 10166
Altec Lansing A7 "Voice of the Theatre" a good choice to get the music volume above the noise of a wood working shop.

Lol Lol Lol...now that's funny.  [big grin]

And with all the machine tools operating at the same time. [smile]

So @sebr023 did you solve your problem and do you have any additional photo's to share?
« Last Edit: October 29, 2022, 09:44 AM by Cheese »

Offline Vtshopdog

  • Posts: 175
LOL - the VOT's achieve a trifecta:
Take a ton of space
Sound bad (per Cheese)
Really ugly (I.M.O.)

Did a quick internet read and they have reputation of harsh treble but conversely are also a cult favorite.  Apparently they do not match well with high powered solid state amps that took over the market in 70's and 80's.  Best used with low wattage single end triode type tube amps circa late 50's.

Offline sebr023

  • Posts: 45
Gluing up speaker cabinet - 1/16” inch gap to fix - need help please.
« Reply #28 on: October 29, 2022, 01:11 PM »
@Cheese (did it work? How do I tag someone?)

Thanks for asking.
Yup. It pretty much did it!
I was left with a bump on the longer panel, but I don’t think I would be able to fix that anyway.



The opening was on the left side of that picture.

I’m happy with the result


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« Last Edit: October 29, 2022, 04:35 PM by sebr023 »

Online Cheese

  • Posts: 10166
LOL - the VOT's achieve a trifecta:
Take a ton of space
Sound bad (per Cheese)
Really ugly (I.M.O.)

Did a quick internet read and they have reputation of harsh treble but conversely are also a cult favorite.  Apparently they do not match well with high powered solid state amps that took over the market in 70's and 80's.  Best used with low wattage single end triode type tube amps circa late 50's.

Ya, these were originally designed to be used as...wait for it...sound reinforcement speakers, as in auditoriums, outdoor music events and theaters. But somehow people decided in the 70's that they'd be great music speakers, so they became extremely popular because back then bigger was better and these things were relatively cheap considering their size and the quality of the components inside. [big grin] Just the horn driver alone, minus the horn, weighed 10-15#


Back to your tube amp statement, my friend drove these things bi-amped with a pair of Audio Research D51 and D79 tube amps to clean up the sound a bit.

« Last Edit: October 29, 2022, 01:39 PM by Cheese »

Online Cheese

  • Posts: 10166
@Cheese (did it work? How do I tag someone?)

Thanks for asking.
Yup. It pretty much did it!
I was left with a bump on the longer panel, but I don’t think I would be able to fix that anyway.



The opening was on the left side of that picture.

I’m happy with the result


Glad everything came out ok...the big bump is now part of the past, it looks good.

@sebr023
No your tag did not work, you need to make sure the name is exactly like it appears on the forum. In my case the "C" should be upper case. Try changing just that and I'll bet it works. I usually start typing in the name and then a drop down list appears.

Festool USA does not pre-approve the contents of this website nor endorse the application or use of any Festool product in any way other than in the manner described in the Festool Instruction Manual. To reduce the risk of serious injury and/or damage to your Festool product, always read, understand and follow all warnings and instructions in your Festool product's Instruction Manual. Although Festool strives for accuracy in the website material, the website may contain inaccuracies. Festool makes no representations about the accuracy, reliability, completeness or timeliness of the material on this website or about the results to be obtained from using the website. Festool and its affiliates cannot be responsible for improper postings or your reliance on the website's material. Your use of any material contained on this website is entirely at your own risk. The content contained on this site is provided for informational purposes only and does not constitute professional advice.


Offline Packard

  • Posts: 1640
[…]but who is to say what sounds best? […]
True.  I have a pair of reference grade (read “expensive”) earbuds.  They came with a print out showing how closely they reproduced the sound.

But most headphones, earbuds and music players are significantly boosted in the bass. 

By comparison the “reference grade” earbuds sound lacking in base.  I much prefer listening to music with my excellent “1More” earbuds. 

But for spoken word, the reference grade earbuds offer a level of clarity that is unmatched by any other headphones/earbuds that I have listened to. The fact that is it noise isolating (not “noise cancelling”) may play into this also.

I do think most people prefer the over-boosted bass that is now the fashion.  Science strives for accuracy, but our ears do not necessarily agree.

Offline Vtshopdog

  • Posts: 175
@sebr023 they're looking good, nice rescue of the bulging glue up.

Have you cut the driver openings in your baffles yet?  Depending on frame shape and recess depth mid and bass driver openings can benefit from chamfering the backside of the opening to open up air flow around perimeter of the cone.  Just takes a couple minutes and can't hurt anything.

Below pic is an example, in this case I had to cut the chamfers before gluing, veneering and making final opening cuts on the front of box once it was assembled.  I sometimes do not extend chamfer behind mounting screws, especially in MDF, depends on driver frame and screw placement dimensions.  These are the 6 unrecessed areas around radius marked in Sharpie pen you see in this photo.

Also, here's a link to an article about this:
http://www.troelsgravesen.dk/chamfer.htm


« Last Edit: October 29, 2022, 03:20 PM by Vtshopdog »

Offline sebr023

  • Posts: 45
[…]but who is to say what sounds best? […]
True.  I have a pair of reference grade (read “expensive”) earbuds.  They came with a print out showing how closely they reproduced the sound.

But most headphones, earbuds and music players are significantly boosted in the bass. 

By comparison the “reference grade” earbuds sound lacking in base.  I much prefer listening to music with my excellent “1More” earbuds. 

But for spoken word, the reference grade earbuds offer a level of clarity that is unmatched by any other headphones/earbuds that I have listened to. The fact that is it noise isolating (not “noise cancelling”) may play into this also.

I do think most people prefer the over-boosted bass that is now the fashion.  Science strives for accuracy, but our ears do not necessarily agree.
Didn’t hear them, but I’ve seen a video of Linus tech tip trying out abyss headphone, and they seem to be very good, if ever it may interest you.


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Offline sebr023

  • Posts: 45
Gluing up speaker cabinet - 1/16” inch gap to fix - need help please.
« Reply #34 on: October 29, 2022, 04:44 PM »
@sebr023 they're looking good, nice rescue of the bulging glue up.

Have you cut the driver openings in your baffles yet?  Depending on frame shape and recess depth mid and bass driver openings can benefit from chamfering the backside of the opening to open up air flow around perimeter of the cone.  Just takes a couple minutes and can't hurt anything.

Below pic is an example, in this case I had to cut the chamfers before gluing, veneering and making final opening cuts on the front of box once it was assembled.  I sometimes do not extend chamfer behind mounting screws, especially in MDF, depends on driver frame and screw placement dimensions.  These are the 6 unrecessed areas around radius marked in Sharpie pen you see in this photo.

Also, here's a link to an article about this:
http://www.troelsgravesen.dk/chamfer.htm


(Attachment Link)
I did actually, both opening and I rounded  over all the interior edge.
The CSS audio kit and instruction are very nice.
It’s my first speaker cabinet, can’t wait to hear them. I did a car subwoofer like 15 years ago. But that’s it.

Center channel baffle interior face. Round over is 3/8 on 3/4 ply :


This is where the twitter will be installed:


Center channel brace:


Left and right speaker brace:



Left and right baffle interior side:



Bonus pictures:
1/2 corian and 3/4 birch plywood baffle. Laminated together with silicone.


Extra bonus picture:
Look that m going for



Bonus points if you noticed that the left and right speaker are chamfered edge and the Center channel are rabbet/dado

Miter joint didn’t go very well when I first did the left and right


[mention]Vtshopdog [/mention] i see your using domino’s for your build. What do you think of it?
My guess is that it should make your life easier! I wish I had one!

Edit: I should stop using Tapatalk app, attaching picture is a pain and picture are low resolution. :((


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« Last Edit: October 29, 2022, 04:48 PM by sebr023 »

Offline Crazyraceguy

  • Posts: 2074
You can't tell from the pics, if they are or not, but as a bit of advice... don't thread into the Corian. Drill the holes oversized and screw into the plywood behind it.
CSX
DF500 + assortment set
PS420 + Base kit
OF1010
OF1010F
OF1400
MFK700 (2)
TS55, FS1080, FS1400 holey, FS1900, FS3000
CT26E + Workshop cleaning set
RO90
RO125
ETS EC 125
RAS115
ETS 125 (2)
TS75
Shaper Origin/Workstation/Plate
MFT clamps set
Installers set
Centrotech organizer set
Socket/Ratchet set

Offline sebr023

  • Posts: 45
You can't tell from the pics, if they are or not, but as a bit of advice... don't thread into the Corian. Drill the holes oversized and screw into the plywood behind it.
Yes! Already thought of that. Thank you.
Corian doesn’t hold screw very well. That why I laminated it with silicone. I pre drill them to have hole locations, but didn’t plan on screwing into the corian!


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Offline Crazyraceguy

  • Posts: 2074
Good, glad to hear it. Yes, Corian does not do well with fasteners. It is a bad combination of dense and crumbly. I have seen people try it, but it never works well. You have to drill the hole so oversize to get the screw to actually go in, that it will strip immediately. If you force it into a hole that is too small, it will bind/lock -up and the worst part is that the base material will split or crack/crumble away.
Over-sized holes and screwing through it is the only way. Corian is thermally reactive. It grows/shrinks with temperature changes and, just like wood, it will split or buckle if it is constrained buy something stronger. I have literally seen it broken around handrails and light fixtures where someone pushed their luck.
CSX
DF500 + assortment set
PS420 + Base kit
OF1010
OF1010F
OF1400
MFK700 (2)
TS55, FS1080, FS1400 holey, FS1900, FS3000
CT26E + Workshop cleaning set
RO90
RO125
ETS EC 125
RAS115
ETS 125 (2)
TS75
Shaper Origin/Workstation/Plate
MFT clamps set
Installers set
Centrotech organizer set
Socket/Ratchet set

Offline sebr023

  • Posts: 45
Oh! Didn’t know THAT much! That’s good to know. Honestly, at first I figured that since the screws would go in the ply, I’d be good. But in the light of all the information and knowledge you just gave me, I’ll make sure to follow that!


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Offline sebr023

  • Posts: 45
Also, while I’m here.

When my box are done, before finishing, what you be the best way the give those cabinet the little less chamfer on the edge to remove sharp corner?!

Like maybe a 1/32 chamfer ?


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Offline Crazyraceguy

  • Posts: 2074
I would just break the corners by hand with a sanding block. Anything smaller that an 1/8" or so is difficult to do with a machine anyway.
CSX
DF500 + assortment set
PS420 + Base kit
OF1010
OF1010F
OF1400
MFK700 (2)
TS55, FS1080, FS1400 holey, FS1900, FS3000
CT26E + Workshop cleaning set
RO90
RO125
ETS EC 125
RAS115
ETS 125 (2)
TS75
Shaper Origin/Workstation/Plate
MFT clamps set
Installers set
Centrotech organizer set
Socket/Ratchet set

Offline sebr023

  • Posts: 45
Follow up on the build for those interested:
Crossover are now glue in place.
Next step is to glue the back pannel. Then Install foam. Glue up the front baffle, apply stain, apply “clear”.





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Offline Vtshopdog

  • Posts: 175
Nice work.  At this rate you will be able to plug then in within a few days.  Always fun moment to fire them up first time.

From question in earlier post, yes Domino machine is absolutely wonderful.  If you can justify cost of owning one, highly recommend as will many others on this forum

Online Cheese

  • Posts: 10166
...apply stain, apply “clear”.

If this side is going to show, I'd suggest starting the staining process on a small area of this side of the cabinet. There appears to be several areas where excess glue squeezed out and those areas may or may not take the stain depending upon the amount of glue on the surface/in the grain and the color of the stain.

Some light sanding and then testing with alcohol or water will give you an idea of what areas will hold the stain.


Offline ChuckS

  • Posts: 3978
Cheese's advice is spot-on. All glue residue spots must be cleaned up before finishing, or they'll show.

A card scraper user? If so, it'll just take a few sweeps to fix a spot, without damaging the veneer to the core.

Offline sebr023

  • Posts: 45
Nice work.  At this rate you will be able to plug then in within a few days.  Always fun moment to fire them up first time.

From question in earlier post, yes Domino machine is absolutely wonderful.  If you can justify cost of owning one, highly recommend as will many others on this forum
Cant justify the cost for now, but definitely on my list!

Yes, and I can’t wait.
Tested the crossover couples weeks ago, to see if my solder were good. Wasn’t really impressed with the sound, but the driver didn’t have any box to go in! Haha.

I’ve received the kit in July 2021. Its been a year and a half I’m working on these. But we had a baby last septembre, and last summer we were renovating the house, so free time is not abundantly.


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Offline sebr023

  • Posts: 45
...apply stain, apply “clear”.

If this side is going to show, I'd suggest starting the staining process on a small area of this side of the cabinet. There appears to be several areas where excess glue squeezed out and those areas may or may not take the stain depending upon the amount of glue on the surface/in the grain and the color of the stain.

Some light sanding and then testing with alcohol or water will give you an idea of what areas will hold the stain.

(Attachment Link)
Thank you for this! Will definitely follow your advice.
I’ve tried staining the edge and the result wasn’t very nice, seemed butchy at some spot.

Will try to remove as much glue as I can before


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Offline sebr023

  • Posts: 45
Cheese's advice is spot-on. All glue residue spots must be cleaned up before finishing, or they'll show.

A card scraper user? If so, it'll just take a few sweeps to fix a spot, without damaging the veneer to the core.
I have one, but I don’t know if it’s not sharp enough or what, but didn’t find it very useful. Light chisel pass seemed to work better


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Online Cheese

  • Posts: 10166

Thank you for this! Will definitely follow your advice.
I’ve tried staining the edge and the result wasn’t very nice, seemed butchy at some spot.

Will try to remove as much glue as I can before


Ya, sanding or scraping like Chuck suggested is your best solution. Sand or scrape a troubled area and then put a small amount of distilled water, like from an eye dropper, on the surface. If the water beads up on the surface then the grain still has glue on it. If the water soaks in then you MIGHT be okay. You'll not know for sure until you stain the surface but you need to give yourself every advantage here because you'll not like the blotchy finish that will result from the glue contamination.

Use distilled water for testing because any minerals have been removed and you'll not have to deal with mineral deposit issues during the testing stage. If the water soaks into the wood, it will raise the grain in that area so let it dry fully and then lightly sand the area again to remove the fuzz.

A lighter colored stain will produce less noticeable blotches than a darker colored stain. Again, the amount of success you have with the glue removal issues may determine your choice of stain color. You've put a lot of work and time in this project so some extra prep time now is well worth the effort.

Good luck and keep us updated.  [smile]

Edit...Also once properly assembled and placed, let us know what your thoughts are on the sound signature of the speakers. There are some lurking audiophiles here.  [cool]
« Last Edit: November 01, 2022, 12:48 PM by Cheese »

Offline Michael Kellough

  • Posts: 5712
Great tips from Chuck ‘n Cheese  ;)

Without a card scraper you can use utility knife blades. It’s easier to control a long paint scraper blade but you can get good results with a regular blade. Bending the blade so that the convex side goes forward allows you to do spot scraping.

Offline sebr023

  • Posts: 45
Gluing up speaker cabinet - 1/16” inch gap to fix - need help please.
« Reply #50 on: November 01, 2022, 01:14 PM »
Yesterday I glued the back pannels .
Also, worry not! this is my garage, I’m not doing this is my kitchen like a mad man!





And I did protected the cords over for any glue spill :


Next step: installing foam.

After installing foam, should I glue the baffle and corian in, before finishing? Or after?


Edit: figured that I’ll glue the baffle after finishing all other side. I’ll use pinter tape to protect finished side from glue squeeze out.

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« Last Edit: November 03, 2022, 10:18 AM by sebr023 »

Offline sebr023

  • Posts: 45
Gluing up speaker cabinet - 1/16” inch gap to fix - need help please.
« Reply #51 on: November 23, 2022, 09:52 AM »
@sebr023 they're looking good, nice rescue of the bulging glue up.

Have you cut the driver openings in your baffles yet?  Depending on frame shape and recess depth mid and bass driver openings can benefit from chamfering the backside of the opening to open up air flow around perimeter of the cone.  Just takes a couple minutes and can't hurt anything.

Below pic is an example, in this case I had to cut the chamfers before gluing, veneering and making final opening cuts on the front of box once it was assembled.  I sometimes do not extend chamfer behind mounting screws, especially in MDF, depends on driver frame and screw placement dimensions.  These are the 6 unrecessed areas around radius marked in Sharpie pen you see in this photo.

Also, here's a link to an article about this:
http://www.troelsgravesen.dk/chamfer.htm


(Attachment Link)
How were you able to make the “pocket” where the router bit is going toward the Center in order to let more wood for the screws? Like the offset?!

Don’t know how to explain, I figured a screenshot would make it easier haha!




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Offline Vtshopdog

  • Posts: 175
I used my router mounted on circle cutting jig with a plunge base. 
Made one shallow pass full 360 degrees then followed with individual segments plunged deeper to create the chamfers for the driver backs. 

I did this before making the driver cutouts.  Since yours are already cut best bet will be using a piloted chamfer bit to cut the segments.  If your boxes are already glued (I think this is the case, no?) then you won’t be able to do it this way or you will need some sort of router bit with top mount pilot bearing, likely hard to find and/or expensive.

Cut out by hand with a rasp??

Offline sebr023

  • Posts: 45
I used my router mounted on circle cutting jig with a plunge base. 
Made one shallow pass full 360 degrees then followed with individual segments plunged deeper to create the chamfers for the driver backs. 

I did this before making the driver cutouts.  Since yours are already cut best bet will be using a piloted chamfer bit to cut the segments.  If your boxes are already glued (I think this is the case, no?) then you won’t be able to do it this way or you will need some sort of router bit with top mount pilot bearing, likely hard to find and/or expensive.

Cut out by hand with a rasp??
They are done by now. But I remember I wanted to ask you.

It’s pretty neat how it’s done.

For mine I just used a smaller quarter round bit. Used a 3/8 radius.
Could have gone way bigger with the corian baffle.


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