Author Topic: Folding box  (Read 3465 times)

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Offline hissatsu

  • Posts: 52
Folding box
« on: June 14, 2008, 11:55 PM »
Unfortunately  I don't have work in progress photos, since I did this about a month ago, but I kind of doubt I'd ever have the time to document the building process anyway. This box is a design from Basic Box Making by Doug Stowe, though I wouldn't quite call this one basic. Purpleheart and Maple. I used a TS55 for ripping all the pieces the then cut them to size with a Nobex miter saw. Sanding was done with an RO125 EQ. There was also a lot of time on the router table. Finish is shellac, ceramithane, then carnauba wax on the outside, just renaissance wax on the inside.

The dividers are removable, the were done with half laps. Brass hinges are from Horton Brasses. Total dimensions are 6" x 8" x 6" closed and quite a bit bigger open. And if anyone's wondering, the piece of purpleheart attached to the back is only attached to the uppermost "drawer" and keep the whole thing from toppling over when it's fully open.

Front

9146-0

Side

9148-1

Back

9150-2

Top

9156-3

Open Top

9154-4

Fully Opened

9152-5


Pedro
« Last Edit: June 15, 2008, 12:43 AM by hissatsu »

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Offline Eli

  • Posts: 2501
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Re: Folding box
« Reply #1 on: June 15, 2008, 12:43 AM »
Very cool. Nicely done.
Do nothing, stay ahead.

Offline Michael Kellough

  • Posts: 4771
Re: Folding box
« Reply #2 on: June 15, 2008, 01:08 AM »
....and great photos!

Offline poto

  • Posts: 408
Re: Folding box
« Reply #3 on: June 15, 2008, 06:03 AM »
Lovely. How'd you do the splines? Router table, or saw?

Offline hissatsu

  • Posts: 52
Re: Folding box
« Reply #4 on: June 15, 2008, 09:02 AM »
Lovely. How'd you do the splines? Router table, or saw?


Router table with a jig to hold the box at 45 degrees.

Pedro

Offline neilc

  • Posts: 2825
Re: Folding box
« Reply #5 on: June 15, 2008, 09:20 AM »
Excellent Pedro - thank you for sharing. 

Great execution and nicely photographed.

Two questions -

1 are there washers or anything behind the walnut side braces to keep them from rubbing the sides when opening or closing?
2 tell us more about how you photographed the box.  your talent extends to photography as well

neil
« Last Edit: June 15, 2008, 09:24 AM by neilc »

Offline hissatsu

  • Posts: 52
Re: Folding box
« Reply #6 on: June 15, 2008, 09:38 AM »
Excellent Pedro - thank you for sharing. 

Great execution and nicely photographed.

Two questions -

1 are there washers or anything behind the walnut side braces to keep them from rubbing the sides when opening or closing?
2 tell us more about how you photographed the box.  your talent extends to photography as well

neil

Neil,

Purpleheart, not walnut. Walnut would have been so much easier to work with, but then again it really doesn't look much like purpleheart.  Purpleheart likes to tear out. A lot!

There are no washers. The brass screws are lubricated, but that isn't essential. The holes in the braces are slightly oversized so that they move freely as long as the screws aren't overly tightened.

As for photography, I just don't use a flash, and preferably photograph in a room with white walls to reflect light. You do need a tripod though as this results in long exposures. I took the photos on my kitchen table; I got rid of the background in photoshop.

Pedro