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Offline derekcohen

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Entry hall table for a niece
« on: November 26, 2019, 11:12 AM »
I thought that the build might begin with preparing the panels, since there has been some interest in the past shown in the shorter Hammer K3 sliders. Mine has a 49" long slider and a 31" wide table for the rip fence.

The build is an entry hall table for a wedding present for a niece. Her choice was this mid century modern piece, which will be the basis for the build. My job is to re-invent it somewhat.



She wants Jarrah, and I have managed to find something spectacular ... a subtle fiddleback (curly) set of boards that will make a book match (as they are only about 9" wide each).







Most imagine that the value of a slider lies with cross-cutting. It certainly is so. However it is the rip using the slider - rather than the rip fence - which is so amazing.

One side of each board was to be ripped on the slider, before being jointed and resawn. Ripping on the slider is such an advantage with life edges. No jigs required. No rip fence to slide against. Just clamp the board on the slider, and run it past the saw blade. The long sliders can complete the rip in one quick pass. It occurred to me that I should take a few photos of ripping to width since the boards are longer than the slider.

Here you can see that it comes up short ...



In actuality, with the blade raised fully, there is a cut of nearly 54" ...



The solution is to use a combination square to register the position of the side of the board at the front, and then slide the board forward and reposition it ...



... and repeat at the rear ...



The result is a pretty good edge, one that is cleaned up on the jointer in 1 or 2 passes, and then ready for resawing ...



This is the glued panel. It is long enough to make a waterfall two sides and top section (still oversize) ...



The following photo shows the lower section at the rear. What I wanted to show is the way boards are stored. Since I shall not get back to this build until next weekend, all boards are stickered and clamped using steel square sections.



The steel sections are inexpensive galvanised mild steel. These are covered in vinyl duct tape to prevent any marks on the wood and ease in removing glue ...



Done for the day ...



Enough for the case (top/bottom and sides), which will be through dovetailed with mitred corners, the stock for 4 legs (yet to be turned), and rails for the legs (the legs will be staked mortice-and-tenon) and attached with a sliding dovetail.

Regards from Perth

Derek


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Offline derekcohen

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Re: Entry hall table for a niece
« Reply #1 on: November 26, 2019, 11:13 AM »
We are building a version of this hall table ...



We left off last time with basic preparation of stock from rough sawn boards ..



A word of introduction before continuing: while I am best known for hand tool work, I am a blended woodworker and have a pretty full compliment of power tools, which I use. It is horses for courses - power does the grunt work and hands do the details and joinery. So there are machines here as well as hand tools, and I like to believe they coexist well in my builds, as they should.

I began this session by turning the legs ...





The Jarrah for the legs turned out a few shades lighter than expected, and I made an extra piece to experiment with different dye mixes. A final decision shall be made once the case is completed.

The panels needed to sized, which involved measuring from the centre line of the book-matched panels. The quickest way to square this up was to mark a line (in blue tape), and plane to it ... much faster than using power saws, etc.





Once done, you can square up on a jointer ..



... rip to width ...



... and cross cut ...



Here are the panels for the case (sides yet to be dimensioned for height) ...



Packed away for the night ...



When marking the dovetails, it pays to work precisely. Mark carefully ...





My favourite dovetail saw is usually the one I sharpened most recently. This is an original Independence Tools saw by Pete Taran (circa 1995) ..



Completed side panels ...



It begins to be a little more fun as I get to use one of the features I recently built into my new Moxon vise - the Microjig clamps (details of Moxon vise here: http://www.inthewoodshop.com/ShopMadeTools/TheLastMoxon.html).

These are used to hold the tail board to transfer to the pin board ...



Here you see the transferred tails outline in blue tape (easier to see in the hard wood). On the left is a model of the mitred ends that will be part of this build ...



Saw the pins ...



Note that the end pins are not sawn on the outsides.

Now turn the board around, and strike a vertical line at the outer pin ...



Saw this on the diagonal only. Do both sides ...



Place the board flat on the bench and create a chisel wall for each pin (earlier, this would have been done for each tail) ...



The chisel wall will make it easier to create a coplanar baseline when removing the waste (by preventing the chisel moving back over the line). Do this on both sides of the board before proceeding.

Now you can fretsaw away the waste.



Try and get this to about 1mm above the baseline ...



Here is a video of the process:



To create the mitred ends, first mark ...



... and saw about 1mm from the line. This will later be flushed with a chisel for accuracy.



And so this is where we are up to at the end of the weekend ...



So will the sides fit ... or won't they .... mmmmm :)

Regards from Perth

Derek

Offline ultane

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Re: Entry hall table for a niece
« Reply #2 on: November 26, 2019, 11:58 AM »
Where’s the like button?
I might be wrong… Just ask my X...

Offline Bert Vanderveen

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Re: Entry hall table for a niece
« Reply #3 on: November 26, 2019, 02:34 PM »
So I guess you would contain/restrain some of the tension in the wood by clamping it down, but won’t it exercise that need to move later on in the process?
Cheers, Bert Vanderveen

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Offline ForumMFG

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Re: Entry hall table for a niece
« Reply #4 on: November 26, 2019, 07:02 PM »
Where’s the like button?

Yeah really, i would smash it!

Offline derekcohen

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Re: Entry hall table for a niece
« Reply #5 on: January 22, 2020, 12:57 PM »
I've been away from the workshop for a month, travelling around a few cities in Austria and Germany, as well as Prague. It was a good trip, but it's great to be home.

The current build was on hold. This is the entry hall table my niece asked me to build ...



... and this is where we left off last time - ready to fit the first corner ...



Past builds:
Part 1: http://www.inthewoodshop.com/Furniture/EntryHallTableForANiece1.html
Part 2:  http://www.inthewoodshop.com/Furniture/EntryHallTableForANiece2.html

Today we shall put the complete case together. What I wish to focus on is the dovetailing. Not just any dovetailing, but mitred through dovetailing in unforgiving hardwood (here, Fiddleback Jarrah).

Of all the commonly used dovetails, I consider the through dovetail more difficult than the half-blind dovetail. Why ... because two sides are exposed against the single face of the half-blind.

In my opinion, by mitering the ends, the level of complexity is tripled .. at least. Not only are there three faces now, but each needs to be dimensioned perfectly, otherwise each is affected in turn.

This is more difficult than a secret mitred dovetail, where mistakes may be hidden.

I have posted before on building the mitred though dovetail, and it is not my intention to do this again. Instead, what I wish to show are the tuning tricks to get it right.

This is the model of the tail- and pin boards …



In a wide case, such as this, it is critical that the parts go together ideally off the saw or, at least, require minimal adjustment. The more adjustments one makes, the more the dovetails will look ragged.

Tail boards are straightforward. Let’s consider this done. Once the transfer of tails to pins is completed, the vital area is sawing the vertical lines … well, perfectly vertical.

I use blue tape in transferring the marks. The first saw cut is flat against the tape. Note that the harder the wood, the less compression there will be, and so the tail-pin fit needs to be spot on. Where you saw offers an opportunity for ensuring a good fit: if you hug the line (edge of the tape), you get a tight fit. If you encroach a smidgeon over the line, you loosen the fit slightly.



Saw diagionally, using the vertical line as your target …



Only then level the saw and complete the cut …



I do not plan to discuss removing the waste. That was demonstrated in Part 2.

So, the next important area is the mitre. These are scribed, and then I use a crosscut saw to remove the waste about 1mm above the line on both the tail- and pin boards …



Now we are ready to test-fit the boards …



Mmmm …. not a great fit …



… even though the mitres at the sides are tight …



The problem is that the mitres are fat, and the extra thickness is holding the boards apart …



Even sawing to the lines here is likely to leave some fat, which is why it is a waste of energy to try and saw to the line in this instance. It needs to be pared away with a chisel, using a 45-degree fixture.



As tempting and logical as it seems to pare straight down the guide …



… what I experience is that the chisel will skip over the surface of the hard wood rather than digging in and cutting it away. What is more successful is to pare at an angle, and let the corner of the bevel catch the wood …





This is what you are aiming for …





Okay, we do this. And this is the result …





Not bad. But not good enough. There is a slight gap at each side, quite fine, but evident close up.

The source is traced to the mitre not being clean enough. It is like sharpening a blade – look for the light on the edge. If it is there, the blade is not sharp. If there is a slight amount of waste on the mitre, the case will not close up.



To clear this, instead of a chisel – which is tricky to use for such a small amount – I choose to use a file. This file has the teeth on the sides ground off to create “safe” sides.



Try again. The fit is now very good. I will stop there.





So, this is the stage of the project: the case is completed. This is a dry fit …



One end …


The other …



The waterfall can be seen, even without being smoothed and finished …



Regards from Perth

Derek

Offline Mario Turcot

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Re: Entry hall table for a niece
« Reply #6 on: January 22, 2020, 03:50 PM »
Beautiful Derek, the figure on that wood is amazing already. Imagine with finish  [big grin]
Mario

Offline duc996

  • Posts: 174
Re: Entry hall table for a niece
« Reply #7 on: January 22, 2020, 09:53 PM »
Derek, you are a very talented craftsman. Your Niece will cherish your work! Thank you for sharing!

Offline ultane

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Re: Entry hall table for a niece
« Reply #8 on: January 22, 2020, 10:14 PM »
Beautiful work! I wish I had your skills!!!
I might be wrong… Just ask my X...

Offline Jiggy Joiner

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Re: Entry hall table for a niece
« Reply #9 on: January 23, 2020, 08:04 AM »
How beautiful is that timber!  [blink]
Superb craftsmanship as usual, very nice indeed  [thumbs up]

Offline Cort

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Re: Entry hall table for a niece
« Reply #10 on: January 24, 2020, 07:56 PM »
Wow!  What skill.

Offline VirTERM

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Re: Entry hall table for a niece
« Reply #11 on: January 24, 2020, 09:14 PM »
Derek,
Impressive workmanship and beautiful material, can’t wait to see the final product.

Offline derekcohen

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Re: Entry hall table for a niece
« Reply #12 on: January 25, 2020, 10:54 AM »
Thanks for all the comments. Much appreciated.

Regards from Perth

Derek

Offline derekcohen

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Re: Entry hall table for a niece
« Reply #13 on: January 25, 2020, 10:55 AM »
Part 4:

Having completed the dovetailing of the case, the next step is to bevel the front face, and rebate the rear for a back panel.

I had been considering a cove in place of a bevel, however when I mocked this up it came across as appearing too busy. So, back to the bevel.

The angle for the bevel was finalised at 55 degrees. This enabled a 6mm (1/4") flat edge and a bevel that ran to roughly 4mm of the first dovetail. A 45 degree bevel would run into the dovetail.

The lines for the bevel were marked and then roughed out on the table saw ...



The table saw is a slider, and the rip fence was used to position spacers, before clamping a panel for cutting the bevel.

The bevel was then finished with a hand plane ...



This Jarrah is particularly interlocked but planes well with both a high cutting angle (the little HNT Gordon palm smoother) and a close set chipbreaker (the Veritas Custom #4).

Once the bevels were completed, the rear rebate was ploughed ...





Now the panels could be assembled into a case once again, and the work examined for tuning.

Three of the bevels needed tuning. This ranged from a smidgeon here ...



... to a largish amount ...



The case was dissembled and the bevelled edged planed down, re-assembled, checked, pulled apart again, planed ...

The rebates at the rear turned out to not require any tuning, with the exception of one corner ...



... where I had obviously forgotten to plane! :)  :\

That was easily rectified ( ... but the case had to be dissembled again). Finally, this is the rear of the case and the completed rebates ...



This is a rebated corner ...



Here are the front bevelled corners ...





This illustrates by the mitres on the corners of the dovetailed case needed to be perfect. Any undercutting would show here.



Next, the drawer dividers need to be done. I'll mention here - since I would appreciate the thoughts of others - that this area has been my biggest headache.

The reason is that my niece would like the drawers to have the appearance of a single board. However, to achieve this, because of the bevels, is quite complicated.

First of all, the table cannot have just two drawers. The width of the drawers will be greater than their depth, and this would likely lead to racking. Consequently, I plan to build three drawers, which will be more favourable for the width vs depth ratio..

Secondly, if the drawers have dividers between them, which they need (since I do not do runners), then there will be a gap between the drawer fronts (which will not flow uninterrupted).

As I see it, there are two choices: the first is to build the drawers with planted fronts. This is not a method I like (but it may be expedient). The second option is to set the dovetailed drawers sides back (recess them) to account for the internal drawer dividers.

Thoughts?

Regards from Perth

Derek
« Last Edit: January 25, 2020, 12:14 PM by derekcohen »

Offline Alex

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Re: Entry hall table for a niece
« Reply #14 on: January 25, 2020, 11:20 AM »
You are clearly a very skilled craftsman, thanks for sharing your knowledge with us by showing us all these detailed steps. Very interesting.

Offline Jiggy Joiner

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Re: Entry hall table for a niece
« Reply #15 on: January 26, 2020, 04:35 AM »
Just an opinion Derek but, I think the planted front would be accepted in this scenario.
It’s difficult enough if there were just two drawers but, a third makes it a bigger headache. I know you have the purist mindset, but the majority of the time, the drawers will remain closed, and the table will still look beautiful.
Only the purists or people that are like minded to you, would pick up on the planted front.

Offline derekcohen

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Re: Entry hall table for a niece
« Reply #16 on: January 26, 2020, 09:12 AM »
Thanks Jiggy. Just talking about the choice here helps formulate a decision.

What I need are lipped drawers.The question was whether I make them the easy way, which is by planting (glueing) on fronts. Or, whether I build them out of one piece, which is a lot more work as it requires creating half blind dovetails in a rebate.

For those unfamiliar with lipped drawers ..



This is the work of Christian Becksvoort ...





At this point, I am going to do it the hard way and make half-blind sockets in a rebated front. This is similar to building a secret dovetail.

To do this for all the drawers, the insides of the case at each end will require a spacer, essentially a 6mm panel glued to the insides. Each side will be half the thickness of the two middle drawer dividers (each 12mm). The centre dividers will be attached in a dado top and bottom.

Regards from Perth

Derek

Offline jobsworth

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Re: Entry hall table for a niece
« Reply #17 on: January 26, 2020, 09:22 AM »
Just found this thread. I must say you do beautiful work. Your niece will look at that table and remember you the rest of her life. Its truly a heirloom piece

Offline Jiggy Joiner

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Re: Entry hall table for a niece
« Reply #18 on: January 26, 2020, 11:28 AM »
@derekcohen Yes I think I knew you’d choose the more difficult but, more rewarding option, and I admire you for that.
If you’d chosen the easier route, I doubt you would have been truly happy. It would of seemed like the old saying “Spoiling the ship for a ha'pworth of tar”

It sounds like your niece has an eye for detail too, so I’m sure she’ll appreciate you going the extra mile on it.
The detail will be amazing!

Offline JSlovic

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Re: Entry hall table for a niece
« Reply #19 on: January 27, 2020, 07:29 PM »
Derek,
Absolutely stunning design and craftsmanship- looking forward to seeing your continued progress 

Offline derekcohen

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Re: Entry hall table for a niece
« Reply #20 on: February 01, 2020, 11:36 AM »
The basic case complete ...



My niece's expressed wish is to have a table front looking as if it was faced by a single board. The original model for this project has two drawers. I did not see this working here since, as their width would be greater than their depth, two drawers would likely rack. Consequently, I decided to build three drawers of equal width (I considered a narrow drawer in the centre, but decided this would be too busy).

In order that the figure of the drawer fronts would not be interrupted by the drawer dividers, the drawers are to have half-blind dovetailed side lips, such as these ...



The drawers will each have a side lip of 6mm. This requires a 6mm wide side panel on each side of the case, and two 12mm wide drawer dividers. This will allow three drawers to run adjacent to one another, and the three fronts to be cut from a single board.

The drawer fronts will come from this board ...





Below are the panels for fitting ...



It occurred to me later (of course!) that the 6mm end panels could have been made to run with the grain direction of the case. Being the same Jarrah, this would have counted for any expansion/contraction, and there would not be any danger of movement being intrusive. Too late. It's glued.

So I did the next best thing, and planed 2mm off the upper and lower edges. This will permit enough movement, if any (it is a small and thin panel). There will not be any gaps seen as the front edges will later receive edging, which will be used as a depth stop.



Frankly, the hardest part of this section of the project was accurate marking out of the two central drawer dividers. These need to be both perfectly parallel, and also aligned vertically (the lower panel with the upper panel).

There is a second area that needed to checked, which is important for drawers to work well, and this that the lower panel is flat - that is, does not have any hills. I learned my lesson the hard way about this. All good.

The way I go about marking the dados for the dividers is to make templates for their position. These are used on both the lower panel, as below, and then the upper panel ...



The process is self-explanatory ...







The dados are knifed deeply ...



Chisel walls cut ...



.. and then the waste is removed with a router plane ...





The dados are just 2mm deep. That is deep enough to prevent any movement. This process is quick and relaxing (compared to setting up and using a power router).

Once done, the process is repeated on the upper panel ...





All ready for a dry fit. The rear of the case ...



... and the front ...



Happily, all is square ...





Tomorrow I shall glue it up.

Regards from Perth

Derek

Offline ScotF

  • Posts: 2742
Re: Entry hall table for a niece
« Reply #21 on: February 01, 2020, 11:56 AM »
Beautiful project!! Thanks for all the pics...wow! Great craftsmanship!!

Offline rubber_ducky

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Re: Entry hall table for a niece
« Reply #22 on: February 01, 2020, 02:37 PM »
Amazing work. Bravo!


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

Offline derekcohen

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Re: Entry hall table for a niece
« Reply #23 on: February 02, 2020, 06:37 AM »
There needs to be a Thank You button for all the replies ... thanks! :)

We ended the last session with the drawer dividers installed ...



Everything was nice and square, but the more I thought about what I had done, the unhappier I became. Such an elementary oversight. I cannot believe I did it, and also that no one pulled me up for it. What was it? Two items:

The first was that the grain for the drawer dividers runs the wrong way. Although the boards are as close to quarter grain as possible, which adds to stability, they will expand vertically. That could cause them to buckle, and then the drawers will not run nicely.

The second is that I could have built in a way to close up the drawer dividers against the back of the (to-be-built) side lipped drawer fronts ... this is to be used as a drawer stop ... at this stage it would be necessary to add a filler. Not good.

So I re-did the drawer dividers. Here is the rear of the case. The drawers are left long on purpose ...



Provision is made for the dividers to be adjustable in length (to close up with the back of the drawer front). They are given rebates to slide further forward ... it will be necessary that they move around 15mm forward (to within 5-6mm of the opening).



The rebate is 2mm deep (the depth of the dados), and largely created with a cutting gauge. The blade slices away end grain, and the resulting splitting away makes it easy to chop the remainder.

Here are the dividers, further forward than before, and capable of moving a little more still ...





The plan was to glue up the case. However, before this is done, it is wise to fit the drawer fronts across the width (the height will be done at a later date).

This is the board for the three drawers.



Removing one end, the board is set on the case ...



It is now apparent that the front of the bevel, where it meets the drawers, is not straight. It is possible to see a small amount of flat ...



This is especially noticeable in this corner ..



This is fairly easy to remedy ... mark with a pencil, and then plane away the pencil marks ...



Perfect now ...



The other end needs no more than a smidgeon removed ..



The upper side is now treated the same way. Interestingly, this needs no work at all.

Time to saw the drawer fronts to size.

First step is to mark the middle point of each divider (since the lips will share the divider). The mark can be seen in the rebate ...



The drawer board across the front ...



Transfer the mark, and then saw the drawer front ...



This process is repeated. Here are the three sequential drawer fronts. You can just make out the breaks ...





I am happy with this.

And so, finally, the case is glued up (Titebond Liquid Hide Glue - reversibility and long open time). Looking like a trussed up fowl ....



Regards from Perth

Derek

Offline derekcohen

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Re: Entry hall table for a niece
« Reply #24 on: February 03, 2020, 10:49 AM »
The case was glued up yesterday, with everything tight and square as one could wish, but I did not sleep well. I was haunted by the thought that there was a problem that would come to a head some time in the future.



If you look at the grain direction of the two centre drawer dividers, you notice that the grain is vertical. That is the way it should be. Wood moves, expands and contracts. It does this in reaction to moisture in the air. When it moves, it does so across the grain. That is why solid wood drawer bottoms have grain across the width - allowing the drawer bottom to move towards the back of the drawer, rather than towards the sides (where it will be blocked and then buckle).

These drawer dividers will be butted up against the rear of the drawer lips and act as drawer stops. The front third of the divider will be glued in the dado, forcing any expansion towards the rear of the case. All good.

The two spacers at the inside ends of the case have the grain running horizontally. I glued this in before I realised that I had cut them this way. I had done the same with the internal dividers, but re-cut them, as shown in the previous article. The end spacers will expand vertically, and to allow for this, I provided a 2mm gap below and above the panels. That is what kept me awake.

The end spacers are 6mm thick. The case, to which they are glued, is 20mm thick and about 40mm wider. Initially I was concerned that the spacer would be overwhelmed by the case moving, and buckle. Having thought some more about this, I am no longer concerned that this will occur. Why? Because movement in the case would instead "stretch" the spacer length-wise. I started to breath again.

In the end, I decided to reduce the height of the spacers by half. This would allow them plenty of space to expand, when necessary, as well as reducing their impact inside the case.

Here is one side ...



Taped for visibility and protection ...



The saw is a 16" Wenzloff & Sons tenon saw (10 tpi) ...



Three kerfs ...



Deepened with a Japanese Azebiki ...



... and split out with a firmer chisel ...



A Bahco carbide scraper cleans up ...



The result ...





Final cleanup was aided by the only shoulder plane that fitted inside the space :)  ...



Regards from Perth

Derek

Offline cider

  • Posts: 8
Re: Entry hall table for a niece
« Reply #25 on: February 03, 2020, 11:42 AM »
I noticed the grain direction thingy, but just assumed you know what you're doing--and you do :)  Thanks for showing the challenges you run into and your solutions.  I'm came here for the eye candy, but learned a lot from your decision-making process.

BTW, I noticed you marked all the drawer fronts at once.  Does your blade kerf match the drawer gap?

Offline derekcohen

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Re: Entry hall table for a niece
« Reply #26 on: February 03, 2020, 11:48 AM »
Quote
BTW, I noticed you marked all the drawer fronts at once.  Does your blade kerf match the drawer gap?

It is a bit of an illusion. I marked one, cut it, butted the next against it, cut that, butted the third ....

Regards from Perth

Derek

Offline derekcohen

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Re: Entry hall table for a niece
« Reply #27 on: February 16, 2020, 10:57 AM »
As a reminder, we are building a version of this table ...



The plan is to attach the legs, which were made near the start of this project.



The attachment method is by inserting the legs into compound angle mortices in a base, which will be fixed to the carcase with a tapered sliding and stopped dovetail. We don't mess about here! :)

It will be necessary to do this over two articles, the first being the base for the legs, which will be dovetailed (tails). The second will be the socket (pins) for the base.

Before we begin, I want to mention what I did at the end of the last session. I had replaced the central drawer dividers as the grain ran in the wrong direction. The spacers at the ends also did so, and my response was to cut out half the spacer ...



Well, I fretted over the end spacers, and just could not leave them this way. Encouraged by the way the halves had come out cleanly, I removed the remainder and replaced the spacers with correctly grained versions ...



OK, onto the leg base ...

I spent a while playing with angles for the legs, and finally accepted this (mocked up base) ...





I have drilled angled mortices with a brace on a number of occasions. This time I decided to used a drill press and some Japanese Star-M augers, which are specially designed for this type of work (no lead screws). I built a 10 degree ramp for the resultant angle. The auger is 30mm ...



[

The tenon is straight, but the mortice will receive a slight reaming, and the tenon will be glued and wedged. This is probably overkill since the weight of the case rests on the legs.



These are the bases for the legs. The final prototype is at the rear ...



Drilling the bases ...



The design requires that the legs do not go over the boundary of the case (to avoid tripping over them) ...





This is how they should be ...



There was a small dilemma: The base at one side measures 3" from the end ...



... and the other side measures 1/4" further ...



I could not work out how this occurred. The angles are the same. In fact, I made another set of bases, and the same error showed up again - exactly the same! 

So what to do? Actually, the decision was obvious after a little think - make the bases the same. What is more likely to be noticed is if the bases are different distances from the sides. No one will notice a 1/4" difference where the legs hit the ground. So be it.

This is one of the bases for dovetailing ...



First step is to remove a 2mm taper from one side. The taper will be on the inside of the base, with the outside parallel to the side of the case.

Taper line drawn ...



Easiest way to do this is with a #604 smoother ..



This is the one end of the base ...



.. and this is the other end ...



mmmm .... 0.39 mm oversize. What to do ...?    I'm kidding   :) 

The dovetails will be 7mm deep. A shoulder was planed with a rebate plane ...



The squareness of this rebate is important, so check ...



The dovetail is now to be created, and the preparatory step is to colour the outer edge of the rebate with a sharpie. This will warn that the planing does not lower the external edge of the rebate.



The dovetail is created with a modified Stanley #79 edge plane ...



The fence has a 1:6 ratio wedge ...



Details of this dovetail plane here: http://www.inthewoodshop.com/ShopMadeTools/SlidingDovetailsWithTheStanley79.html

The result of planing. That is a 1:6 dovetail marker ...



So what are the numbers for the taper? This will give an indication of the accuracy of the joint.

One end is 44.12mm ...



... and the other is 46.46mm, which is a difference of 2.34mm.



This will work - the pin socket is measured from this (in the same way as dovetails for a drawer.

The reason for the 7mm depth? The case is 20mm thick. the dovetail should be about 1/3 of this thickness. I decided to take it to the depth of the rebate for the rear panel ...



So, here is one of the completed bases ...



And this is where it will be fitted ...



Regards from Perth

Derek
« Last Edit: February 16, 2020, 11:11 AM by derekcohen »

Offline Bert Vanderveen

  • Posts: 616
Re: Entry hall table for a niece
« Reply #28 on: February 16, 2020, 11:07 AM »
Wouldn’t it have been easier (and more in line with the MidCent style) to bore the holes into the bases at a straight angle, with the bases 4C’d, and shape the bases afterwards to obtain the desired splay of the legs? [My dad did it that way for smallish side tables he made in the late sixties — all of my aunts and uncle had those in their homes at one time.)
Cheers, Bert Vanderveen

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Offline derekcohen

  • Posts: 410
    • In The Woodshop
Re: Entry hall table for a niece
« Reply #29 on: February 16, 2020, 11:14 AM »
Bert, the 20mm thick case is too thin to hold the tenon. Morticing directly into a 20mm case is a recipe for later failure.

In the case of much of these pieces in the 50's, the legs were screwed in with a single bit into a mechanical fastener. Ugh.

Regards from Perth

Derek
« Last Edit: February 16, 2020, 11:35 AM by derekcohen »