Author Topic: Double Dutch Garage Door Project  (Read 38839 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline Barry Londrigan

  • Posts: 180
  • Newark, Ohio
Double Dutch Garage Door Project
« on: January 02, 2009, 07:31 PM »
Well, I have been threatening to replace one of my 8 foot overhead doors, on what USED to be my garage, for quite some time now.  I finally got started on this.  It has been a very hard project for me due to inexperience with something of this scale and the design of it about kicked my mental butt!  The hardest part of this project for me thus far was the fact that these doors will have so many ways that the need to be weather sealed and me having no knowledge on how to do it.  Scouring the web and forums, I think I have come up with a way that would work.  I used kerf-in weatherstripping where I could so far and again, planning ahead for how this would all fit together for me was the hardest part.  The one item that has helped me out the most was Sketchup.  Sketchup allows me to see so many things that I might miss in the planning stages of projects. 

The project also includes finishing out a raised floor I previously installed so that it would be finished out to the front of the shop and provide the new threshold.  I will also demo the old door and raise the header for the new doors.

Without further babbling...I will get started trying to relay what I have done thus far.

Here is the problem area :)

« Last Edit: January 02, 2009, 07:43 PM by Barry Londrigan »

Festool USA does not pre-approve the contents of this website nor endorse the application or use of any Festool product in any way other than in the manner described in the Festool Instruction Manual. To reduce the risk of serious injury and/or damage to your Festool product, always read, understand and follow all warnings and instructions in your Festool product's Instruction Manual. Although Festool strives for accuracy in the website material, the website may contain inaccuracies. Festool makes no representations about the accuracy, reliability, completeness or timeliness of the material on this website or about the results to be obtained from using the website. Festool and its affiliates cannot be responsible for improper postings or your reliance on the website's material. Your use of any material contained on this website is entirely at your own risk. The content contained on this site is provided for informational purposes only and does not constitute professional advice.


Offline Barry Londrigan

  • Posts: 180
  • Newark, Ohio
Re: Double Dutch Garage Door Project
« Reply #1 on: January 02, 2009, 07:46 PM »
Wow am I struggling getting images to appear in-line from the gallery.  I am trying to follow the tutorial on how to do that but keep getting the "red x"??

like this...



I am going to the gallery...selecting a picture....going to my address bar and copying the url....coming back to my post and clicking the image icon which inserts the [img][img]...then copying the url address in between the bars.....red x!
« Last Edit: January 02, 2009, 07:50 PM by Barry Londrigan »

Offline Dave Ronyak

  • Posts: 2234
  • Flyin' from NE Ohio
Re: Double Dutch Garage Door Project
« Reply #2 on: January 02, 2009, 07:50 PM »
Barry,

I'm not certain I fully understand the challenges you are describing.  I see your raised wooden floor beyond the overhead door, and understand you plan to reset the header and install a new door.  For the doors themselves, I have been satisfied with the sealing and insulation characteristics of Clopay and other metal clad doors.  You can get 2 inch Styrofoam cores.

Are you seeking comments regarding matching the wooden floor with the new raised threshold?

Dave R.
Friends, family and Festools make for a good retirement.  PCs...I'm not so sure.

Offline Dave Ronyak

  • Posts: 2234
  • Flyin' from NE Ohio
Re: Double Dutch Garage Door Project
« Reply #3 on: January 02, 2009, 07:55 PM »
Barry,

In your first post, the two photos came through OK.  What are you doing different now?  I go to my gallery, click on the photo I want, then right click on its properties, then copy that URL (an http:/) address, then click on the "insert image" button then paste my copied URL between the [img] [img] symbols that appear in the draft message.  i'm a relative newbie to working with photos and hyperlinks.

Dave R.
Friends, family and Festools make for a good retirement.  PCs...I'm not so sure.

Offline Barry Londrigan

  • Posts: 180
  • Newark, Ohio
Re: Double Dutch Garage Door Project
« Reply #4 on: January 02, 2009, 08:00 PM »
Sorry Dave...I was not too clear on what I am up to here!  I am actually building new doors.  Each individual door will be like a sandwhich...2 x 4 framework on the inside...mdf skins on the outside and hardi-panel skin on exterior...finished paneling on the interior.  The inside of the doors will filled with 2.5" of foam board.  There will be four individual doors making up a double dutch set...I have built quite a bit of this but am not quite finished.  some of the pictures will explain the build (I hope!)

Here are some Sketchup pictures of how I designed it.  This doesn't tell all but might give a lilttle idea of what I am thinking here.  You can see in the one image of the upper door, where it looks like a half lap....that will overlap the mating top of the lower door and that is where the kerf-in type weatherstripping will go.

Hope this makes more sense!


Offline Barry Londrigan

  • Posts: 180
  • Newark, Ohio
Re: Double Dutch Garage Door Project
« Reply #5 on: January 02, 2009, 08:02 PM »
Dave, that is exactly what I am doing but I get the red x for some reason.  I went back to the other way...clicking additional options at the bottom of a post and inserting attachments that way.

Offline Forrest Anderson

  • Posts: 1072
Re: Double Dutch Garage Door Project
« Reply #6 on: January 02, 2009, 08:06 PM »
Wow am I struggling getting images to appear in-line from the gallery.  I am trying to follow the tutorial on how to do that but keep getting the "red x"??

like this...

Code: [Select]
[img]http://www.festoolownersgroup.com/CoppermineMain/displayimage.php?album=134&pos=1[/img]
I am going to the gallery...selecting a picture....going to my address bar and copying the url....coming back to my post and clicking the image icon which inserts the <img> <img>...then copying the url address in between the bars.....red x!

The problem is that the link you have copied is that of a whole webpage - notice how it doesn't end in .jpg which is a suffix which indicates a picture.

To insert the URL of the image, you have to right-click on it, go to Properties, and where it says "Address: (URL)", you copy and paste that address instead. In this case the URL of the garage door picture is

Code: [Select]
http://www.festoolownersgroup.com/CoppermineMain/albums/userpics/normal_door_framework_5.jpg
(Notice how this ends with .jpg)

If you enclose that URL between <img> tags, as shown below...

Code: [Select]
[img]http://www.festoolownersgroup.com/CoppermineMain/albums/userpics/normal_door_framework_5.jpg[/img]
...then the picture will show up like this...



Forrest

Compiler of the Consolidated List of Festool Links - the place to go for Festool reviews, manuals, brochures and videos!

Offline Barry Londrigan

  • Posts: 180
  • Newark, Ohio
Re: Double Dutch Garage Door Project
« Reply #7 on: January 02, 2009, 08:22 PM »
Ahhh..Forrest...most excellent..now I'm with you.  I am hopefully off to the races now.  Thank you!

Offline Barry Londrigan

  • Posts: 180
  • Newark, Ohio
Re: Double Dutch Garage Door Project
« Reply #8 on: January 02, 2009, 08:34 PM »
Here you can see a few pictures of a raised floor that I installed quite some time ago.  It stopped short of the original roll up doors that are currently (well...one is) on the shop.  I only plan on replacing one of the doors...the other I will frame in and put in a window.  That will give me more wall space in the garage turned shop. 





Let me tell you what a pain it was installing the raised floor.  It is old computer room tile on supports and beveled and tapered 2 x 6.  Then it is covered with T & G plywood.  The floor is very solid and level.  Anyway...the floor will need to be extended to form the new threshold for the new doors.  I had thought about forming it and pouring concrete but nixed that idea.  I went with framing it in with treated lumber.

Offline Dovetail65

  • Posts: 4619
    • Rose Farm Floor Medallions and Inlays
Re: Double Dutch Garage Door Project
« Reply #9 on: January 02, 2009, 08:47 PM »
I have to love a guy that steals his garage for a shop!

Does the wife park outside like mine?  :)
The one who says it can't be done should avoid interrupting the person doing it.

Offline Barry Londrigan

  • Posts: 180
  • Newark, Ohio
Re: Double Dutch Garage Door Project
« Reply #10 on: January 02, 2009, 08:54 PM »
Yep Nickao she does.  I have to say though that I am very blessed with the fact that she fully understands the need for this shop.  She is tolerant of the fact that the house needs to be remodeled yet we keep pouring more money into building this shop.  Heck, she bought me a boom arm for Christmas!  :)  Besides...it's hasn't fully transitioned into a woodworking shop yet...you can see in the first photo where she doesn't mind spending time in the "shop"....did I mention she loves football?

Offline Dovetail65

  • Posts: 4619
    • Rose Farm Floor Medallions and Inlays
Re: Double Dutch Garage Door Project
« Reply #11 on: January 02, 2009, 09:14 PM »
Sounds like our wives are a lot alike in that sense.

Even when its 20 below and 10 inches of snow she doesn't complain. She leaves right after I go to bed so she is on her own clearing the car of snow to leave in the morning,.

Our home is the same it not only needs work, but half way completed projects are in many rooms and we still get shop stuff before finishing the house.
« Last Edit: January 02, 2009, 09:16 PM by nickao »
The one who says it can't be done should avoid interrupting the person doing it.

Offline Barry Londrigan

  • Posts: 180
  • Newark, Ohio
Re: Double Dutch Garage Door Project
« Reply #12 on: January 02, 2009, 09:30 PM »
Yes that does sound like they are alike.  frankly...I couldn't do this if it wasn't for her and all the help she gives me.  Future plans are to get her Hegner scroll saw and two carvewrights set up...so we can have more fun together :)

Here are some more shots of the demo and getting the floor finished.


In this shot the demolition is near done and a temporary wall is up.


I will need to bring the floor out level with the top of the tile where I will then put 3/4 plywood on top.


The garage floor is sloped such that the boards will require a bevel to account for the front to back slope and a taper to account for the peak in the floor at the center of the garage.  Now you can get the feel for why I felt whole floor project was a real pain!  Here I am shaving a couple blocks (with bevels on the bottom already) and checking for level so that I can determine the dimensions needed to cut a 10' 2 x 8 to fit up front.
« Last Edit: January 02, 2009, 09:32 PM by Barry Londrigan »

Offline Barry Londrigan

  • Posts: 180
  • Newark, Ohio
Re: Double Dutch Garage Door Project
« Reply #13 on: January 02, 2009, 10:26 PM »
We all know that no project goes by without buying something new Festool..and I do need to cut something 10' long and I am sure I don't have to tell anybody what's in that box...




I am set up on the floor with foam boards to make my cut.  The saw is on a 1.5 degree bevel and the marks have been made to account for the taper.


The cut is made with a brand new rip blade in the TS55.


A second board is cut and check for level.


A third board is cut for a "cap" for the threshold.  I used short sections of angle iron with holes drilled for cement anchors to secure the treated lumber to the concrete floor.  The top board was nailed down with a framing nailer.


Blocking was cut and screwed between the long runs for support.  Then the solid 1.25" computer room tiles will be put back in place.  The T & G plywood will fit very nicely over top of all this.  Before that happens all the new framework will rest on top of the threshold.

couple more shots






« Last Edit: January 02, 2009, 10:28 PM by Barry Londrigan »

Offline Dave Ronyak

  • Posts: 2234
  • Flyin' from NE Ohio
Re: Double Dutch Garage Door Project
« Reply #14 on: January 02, 2009, 11:20 PM »
Thanks, Barry.  And Forrest.  Now I understand what you plan to build.  I've been through one of those old garage conversions, too.  I had to rip my  pressure treated floor joists freehand before there was any Festool in USA.  First I thoroughly scrubbed the floor to remove all old oil and grease with solvents with TSP in hot water.  After it was thoroughly cleaned and dry, I spread a heavy layer of bituminous adhesive from Bruce Flooring and over that I laid 6 mil plastic film.  Then I started cutting and laying the PT joists.  When they were all in, I nailed 3/4 PT SYP plywood on top, then started laying the 7/8I thick T&G red oak flooring I made starting with rough sawn lumber purchased from an Amish mill.

But I digress much too far.  Your doors...I'd be concerned about using typical MDF for the outside panels.  I'd be using the waterproof grade that is used for interstate highway signs, which I think is called MDO, or an exterior grade plywood.  I like the layered build-up that you plan.

My former house when built had garage doors with MDF panels in a wooden frame.  Eventually, water seeped into the joints and into the edges of the panels and caused them to degrade.  I replaced them with Clopay metal doors with 2" thick foam cores.  No more warping, no more painting and much better sealing and insulation properties.

Dave R.
Friends, family and Festools make for a good retirement.  PCs...I'm not so sure.

Offline Notorious T.O.D.

  • Posts: 506
Re: Double Dutch Garage Door Project
« Reply #15 on: January 02, 2009, 11:29 PM »
Barry,

Have you planned out how you will hinge these large and heavy doors.  If you have not thought about that you may want to give it some thought before you get too far along with construction.  Many years ago I built an entryway for my dad's place that had a 4' wide by 8 ft tall by 1.75" thick solid cherry door which I estimated weighed about 160-180 pounds without hardware.  It ended up being hung on four 4" ball bearing hinges.  The side jambs also have to be able to handle the weight and the joints in the door itself have to be strong enough to withstand the stress of the doors own weight and gravity pulling on it and making it sag out of square.

Best,
Todd

Offline Dovetail65

  • Posts: 4619
    • Rose Farm Floor Medallions and Inlays
Re: Double Dutch Garage Door Project
« Reply #16 on: January 02, 2009, 11:44 PM »
Barry, looks like a nice shop is coming together! I only wish I could use a separate garage to work in rather than the attached 3 car.

In this county you can not run a home based business out of an unattached garage, Its the most F** up thing ever, but I can run a business in my attached garage. That's why a few guys in the neighborhood have two garages, one unattached for their cars and another 3 or 4 car attached garage for their work shops! One guy even has a five car attached garage!
« Last Edit: January 02, 2009, 11:46 PM by nickao »
The one who says it can't be done should avoid interrupting the person doing it.

Offline Barry Londrigan

  • Posts: 180
  • Newark, Ohio
Re: Double Dutch Garage Door Project
« Reply #17 on: January 03, 2009, 12:23 AM »
Dave, Todd...I have to say that I am doing this all backwards in a way....I am fairly far along at this point and wish I could have found time to learn how to manipulate files and then properly post.  I have been at just that all day.  Anyway, had I been able to do that I could have posted all along while I was planning and building.

I wish I would have used MDO instead of MDF.  I would have liked the flatter surface than MDF as well.  I will do my best to seal the perimeters of the doors against water.  The layers were glued using good constuction adhesive.  The very outside panel is called "Hardi-Panel"  No sweat with the weather..it is cement board and paint will hold up well...BUT..it does bring up more of where your mind is Todd....that Hardi-Panel is HEAVY!  I have not weighed one of thes quadrants (but will) and I have thought long and hard about just the questions you ask.


Here you can see the three layers of build-out for the framing and then the blocking and another 2 x 6 to get the final dimension for the finished frame.  I used 8 inch long heavy screws to hold in place and then went back in (I think three) places and drilled all the way through and put carriage bolts through this whole sandwich.  I will try to get some pictures of that and insert them here.


8 inch long screws


Drilling for the carriage bolts.

I dont believe the framework will pose any problem with sagging...

For the jambs...

Near 2-inch thick solid oak jambs compared to a 2 x 6.

Three of these per quadrant

4.5" x 4.5" hinges with 1/4 inch screws long enough to go through the oak and into the rough framing.

For the doors I reinforced where the 1/4" screws will go into the doors by using two dominos one behing another so that the screws would have something solid to bite into.



You can see that I am fairly well along the build path...I will outline how I went about that in future posts.

BTW...thank you so much for your ideas!

Offline Dave Ronyak

  • Posts: 2234
  • Flyin' from NE Ohio
Re: Double Dutch Garage Door Project
« Reply #18 on: January 03, 2009, 01:06 AM »
Soon we'll be able to see the doors to Fort Londrigan!!  I think the door posts are likely to hold up the weight!  I forgot about the Hardi board.  That's a type of cement board, right?  Certainly weatherproof.  Just seal up that MDF so moisture from condensation doesn't degrade it (cause it to swell).

Dave R.
Friends, family and Festools make for a good retirement.  PCs...I'm not so sure.

Offline Notorious T.O.D.

  • Posts: 506
Re: Double Dutch Garage Door Project
« Reply #19 on: January 03, 2009, 10:00 AM »
Looks like you have thought it out pretty well and done a nice job with the construction too.  It should turn out quite nice I think...

Best,
Todd

Offline Wonderwino

  • Posts: 802
  • That Green Koolaid causes mutations.
Re: Double Dutch Garage Door Project
« Reply #20 on: January 03, 2009, 07:02 PM »
Looks like a nice job!  I've used Dominos as cross dowels to screw in to with MDF.  It sure makes a secure joint easy!
Water separates the people of the world; wine unites them.

Offline Barry Londrigan

  • Posts: 180
  • Newark, Ohio
Re: Double Dutch Garage Door Project
« Reply #21 on: January 04, 2009, 11:32 AM »
Thanks guys for the comments...Dave I think you will be able to see the glow from the smile on my face a couple of hours away when the fort doors are done!

I would like to post a few better pictures of the finished framing to show the measures taken to prevent any sagging and will do so when I pull down the foam board that is protecting me from the elements right now.  This will come down when I am ready to finally install the jamb and hang these heavy doors.


After carefully measuring and marking the panel, I begin cutting the 5/8" MDF to form the inside and outside of the 2 x 4 framework for each of four doors.  I always make sure to only use one tape measure.  I use a 5mm pencil to carefully mark my line and use incra measuring tools to finish my lines I mark for the Festool guide rail to line up with.  I know this is very elementary for all here but using these to measure and mark helps keep the panel square.

Incidentally, I previosly worked out all my dimensions using Sketchup.  I cannot stress it enough how valuable this program is for any project really but for me, one this large, it helps me work out problems before I begin cutting.  It outputs nicely to a program called "Cutlist" as well so that in all your planning stages, and when you get good with the combination of these programs, you can eliminate a lot of clutter in your mind, freeing you up to concentrate on tasks at hand.


I use these for marking or as a square to extend tape measured marks.


Might I mention that THIS blade does not play well with the Hardi-Panel (yes Dave, cement board).  I think this blade is shot but I may buy one of thos HF sharpening systems that has been mentioned here.  http://www.harborfreight.com/cpi/ctaf/displayitem.taf?Itemnumber=96687

« Last Edit: January 04, 2009, 11:44 AM by Barry Londrigan »

Offline Barry Londrigan

  • Posts: 180
  • Newark, Ohio
Re: Double Dutch Garage Door Project
« Reply #22 on: January 04, 2009, 12:33 PM »

Jointing one edge and one face


With the jointed edge against the fence, I cut the 2 x 4s to final width of 3.25"


Planing the 2 x 4s to final thickness of 1.25"


The boards test fitted on a panel. 

The boards will be joined with the Domino joiner.  There will be a second "2 x 4" layer on top of this.  The void space will be filled with 2.5" of "fitted" foam board.  The addition of the second layer also serves the purpose of being able to offset one edge of the bottom doors and both top and bottom edges of the top doors, so the the "kerf in" weather stripping can be applied.

One problem I ran into was cutting these 2 x 4s and going through the effort to dimension them, and then not getting them stapled and glued to the MDF panels right away.  The dimensions will change fast!


Test fitting of two layers.  You can see that the two layers essentially form a half lap joint when they will be glued and screwed together.  A kerf will be cut into the resulting rabbet of the two joined layers.  the weatherstripping will fit in the kerf.
« Last Edit: January 04, 2009, 12:36 PM by Barry Londrigan »

Offline Barry Londrigan

  • Posts: 180
  • Newark, Ohio
Re: Double Dutch Garage Door Project
« Reply #23 on: January 04, 2009, 01:02 PM »

The first layer is glued and stapled to the panel.  The kerf is cut into the top board of the bottom doors.  When the mating end of the top doors close, this will provide a tight fit where the two opposing weatherstrips meet.  This should keep the air out! 


Weatherstrip inserted in kerf.  Another lessen I learned...Put the weatherstripping in that kerf RIGHT AWAY!.  It will close up.  You think I would have learned that after watching the boards move all over the place after I dimensioned then and left them sit overnight!

Another oversight (boo boo)....If you look at the weatherstrip in the previous photo, if I did the same thing to the bottom of the top doors, they would not close.  There is no relief for the opposing weatherstripping to meet.  I probably would have rabbeted that relief evenly on the opposing boards but can't now so I just relieved it on the top door.  That worked out alright.



The bottom board of the top door relief plan.
« Last Edit: January 04, 2009, 01:10 PM by Barry Londrigan »

Offline Barry Londrigan

  • Posts: 180
  • Newark, Ohio
Re: Double Dutch Garage Door Project
« Reply #24 on: January 04, 2009, 01:26 PM »
Here is a door ready to have foam board inserted and the top layer glued and stapled.  I will also use a flush trim bit with a bearing to flush the panel edge to the 2 x 4 frame.  The interior paneling and outside Hardi-Panel will then be glued and brad nailed to the MDF.


This tool was invaluable in drilling holes and driving screws quickly when securing the two layers of 2 x 4 framework together.  The centrotec chuck is great!
« Last Edit: January 04, 2009, 01:32 PM by Barry Londrigan »

Offline Barry Londrigan

  • Posts: 180
  • Newark, Ohio
Re: Double Dutch Garage Door Project
« Reply #25 on: January 04, 2009, 02:27 PM »

Here is a top door ready to receive framework for double layer plexiglass window that will be installed.


Here I am quickly set up for assembly of the window frame with a CMT pocket hole jig mounted to a piece of plywood.  I can quickly clamp this to my MFT and go right to work on drilling.  The C12 with the interchangeable chucks is again my go to tool for this operation.


The 2 x 4s for the window framework have been milled and cut.  Notice they are turned on their side and cut to final height of 2.5" to match the sandwhich layer height of the door framework.  The pocket holes have been drilled.  The clamping elements and the hold downs make easy work of securing the window frame for driving the pocket screws.  I have used story sticks cut to proper length to make the frame square and ready to accept the plexiglass windows which will be installed later.


Here is a finished frame for the window.


The frame is now secured to the door frame with screws and contruction adhesive is applied to all mating surfaces.  I have offset this window a little to the top of the upper door as I am 6'5 and want to be able to easily look out. 


Getting ready to flush trim the window opening.


One side cut out

Other side clamped and then cut out.  Ready for insertion of foam board and assembly.

« Last Edit: January 04, 2009, 02:30 PM by Barry Londrigan »

Offline Barry Londrigan

  • Posts: 180
  • Newark, Ohio
Re: Double Dutch Garage Door Project
« Reply #26 on: January 05, 2009, 07:38 PM »
The Hardi Panel that will cover the outside of these doors is next to rediculous to cut!  I used a flush trim bit on one panel to flush trim the edges and ruined that bit.  The thought of trying that to cut out the window openings with a flush trim bit like I did with the MDF had me perplexed.  With that I started looking around for a bit that I could use in the router that would be stout enough to do the job. 

I found this bit.  It is a 1/4 roto-zip bit.  Looks medieval eh?


Since this was not a bearing guided bit I had to use other measures to cut the window out.  When I had only one MDF window panel cut and secured to the framework, I clamped a Hardi board panel to the door, then turned it over and traced out the window.  Then it was a simple matter of using the guide rail and the OF 1400.  I used a square and measured 2 inched from the line and made sure it was the same distance from one end of the cut to the other.  The guide stop fine adjustment can then be used to drive this beastly bit right up to the line.


Setting up for the cut.


Sliding an FS clamp under the guide rail and using an existing door for support for the cut.


After rotating and clamping the panel down four times, the window was finall cut out.  Even though this bit turned out to be the ticket, I still had to take several shallow passes at this to cut this cement board.  Wow is it tough.  I do recommend this bit if you ever need to cut any cement board.

Offline Dave Ronyak

  • Posts: 2234
  • Flyin' from NE Ohio
Re: Double Dutch Garage Door Project
« Reply #27 on: January 05, 2009, 07:56 PM »
Barry, thanks for the tip regarding the RotoZip bit.  They offer several different bits.  Which one is this "medieval" one?  Is it solid carbide or HSS?

I think I may have one of those for use with my high speed die grinder. (This grinder was originally purchased to make my Corvette engine more powerful, but proven to be one of the most versatile tools I have ever owned.)

What is your estimate of weight of one of the dutch doors you are making?

Dave R.
Friends, family and Festools make for a good retirement.  PCs...I'm not so sure.

Offline Barry Londrigan

  • Posts: 180
  • Newark, Ohio
Re: Double Dutch Garage Door Project
« Reply #28 on: January 05, 2009, 08:14 PM »
Dave

The bit is a Duracut DC-1 carbide bit for cutting cement board.  I was so impressed with it...I went out and bought another....just in case you know :)

I still have not weighed one of the doors yet but I am guessing that each quadrant will weigh from 80 to 100 lbs each.  I am putting three 4.5 inch ball bearing butt hinges on each quadrant.  I am hoping (praying) that this will be what the doctor ordered.

Offline Dave Ronyak

  • Posts: 2234
  • Flyin' from NE Ohio
Re: Double Dutch Garage Door Project
« Reply #29 on: January 05, 2009, 08:21 PM »
That number and size of hinges should be more than enough.  I have a very old set of oak frame French doors, each filled with heavy beveled glass from top to botom (nine lights).  Each passage sized door is supported by three 4 1/2 inch steel hinges, and was long before I came to be their owner.  No problems with the hinges.

Dave R.
Friends, family and Festools make for a good retirement.  PCs...I'm not so sure.