Author Topic: Butterfly Style Dining Room Table  (Read 11794 times)

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Offline CharlesWilson

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Butterfly Style Dining Room Table
« on: March 12, 2009, 08:24 PM »
Here are the pages of a pdf file describing the Butterfly leaf dining table I just finished for my son. It was inspired by the table described by Jerry Work in his Domino manual, and adds a second leaf. I have created a message later in this thread that shows the pdf file content in a single message:

Revised posting

Charles
« Last Edit: March 13, 2009, 08:03 PM by CharlesWilson »
Charles Wilson

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Offline CharlesWilson

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Re: Butterfly Style Dining Room Table
« Reply #1 on: March 12, 2009, 08:24 PM »
The second group of pdfs are in this message.
« Last Edit: March 12, 2009, 09:03 PM by CharlesWilson »
Charles Wilson

Offline CharlesWilson

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Re: Butterfly Style Dining Room Table
« Reply #2 on: March 12, 2009, 08:24 PM »
Here is the last page of the pdf.

The length is now 100?, and it easily fills the room up.
« Last Edit: March 13, 2009, 07:23 PM by CharlesWilson »
Charles Wilson

Offline honeydokreg

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Re: Butterfly Style Dining Room Table
« Reply #3 on: March 13, 2009, 06:19 AM »
charles,  nice looking table.  you and your sone did a great job, and a nice shiney top as well.
pay attention to the details.... they make the difference... festool does
www.builtinking.com
youtube channel:  builtinsbykreg

Offline Jim Kirkpatrick

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Re: Butterfly Style Dining Room Table
« Reply #4 on: March 13, 2009, 06:41 AM »
Great job Charles!  The finish came out awesome!  I'll have to try that Rockhard finish sometime. (that's what she said).  I'd like to see more .jpg's posted instead of .pdf's.  It's a lot of downloading and my computer is so slooowwwwwww at loading Adobe.
PS Hope your hip is on the mend.  As a matter of fact,  I'm typing this with a cast on my wrist.  Busted wrist on one arm and torn rotator cuff on the other.  I know what you're going through, not being able to work in the shop as much as you'd like.  Thank Gawd for FOG, eh?

Offline Dovetail65

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    • Rose Farm Floor Medallions and Inlays
Re: Butterfly Style Dining Room Table
« Reply #5 on: March 13, 2009, 06:50 AM »
I think that was probably one pdf that he was forced to break down to get it on this forum. Changing everything to jpg to just to get it on the forum is even more work for him. Breaking down all the pictures than changing them over and reducing their size takes some time. I have not posted a bunch of stuff becasue its just a hassle to reduce everything and break it down. Clients want a differnt level of quality than the forum can accommodate so its always an issue for some to rework everything to get it posted here.

Best is probably to link out of the forum to one file or post the pics on on flckr and just link to that set. Then even a slower computer can handle it better.

See if you can open this set any faster. I really did not reduce the size of the pictures, but flickr breaks the pictures down for me into many differnt sizes for you to choose to look at. It may be faster for the slower computers to see pics like this I am not sure:

Breton



« Last Edit: March 13, 2009, 07:12 AM by nickao »
The one who says it can't be done should avoid interrupting the person doing it.

Offline Jim Kirkpatrick

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Re: Butterfly Style Dining Room Table
« Reply #6 on: March 13, 2009, 08:51 AM »
That did work a lot quicker.  Wow,  you do some fine work, dude.  Have you done a tutorial before?  I'd be down for that.

Offline CharlesWilson

  • Posts: 458
Re: Butterfly Style Dining Room Table
« Reply #7 on: March 13, 2009, 04:18 PM »
My Yahoo account comes with Flickr for free with one gotcha, that I recently noticed. They limit the number of photos that are visible for display to the 200 most recently added. I will eventually upgrading the account, and then I'll throw a couple of hundred Gigs of stuff on their server, at which time I can easily update this thread to put the text and images in the messages instead of the pdf. They don't let you store pdf's on Flickr, or any raw photos either, so I guess it will just be jpgs.  Of course, I could send bmp's up there, just to back up the images.

Sorry for the inconvenience, guys, but I just wanted to get this out there and declare the project 'done' (at least in my mind).

Charles
Charles Wilson

Offline Dovetail65

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Re: Butterfly Style Dining Room Table
« Reply #8 on: March 13, 2009, 04:35 PM »
The free Flickr account is pretty limited, I just pop for the 25.00 a year. With over 6500 images I guess its worth it. The clients love having access to their pictures of their projects as I am making the inlays. That is what I use it for so the expense is warranted for me. Plus if my computer crashes and the backup goes down too, I still have flickr as my double backup. Ever since my house/shop fire 5 years ago I have been paranoid to lose all my work again. I backed up, but a melted backup drive is still useless. Online backup is a great way to ensure i will never lose any pictures again, both family and work.

Thank you for the compliments.    :)

No, I have never made a full blown tutorial. Maybe some day I will. I am going to upload some info on mating radii  in the next month or so.
« Last Edit: March 13, 2009, 04:39 PM by nickao »
The one who says it can't be done should avoid interrupting the person doing it.

Offline Jim Kirkpatrick

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Re: Butterfly Style Dining Room Table
« Reply #9 on: March 13, 2009, 05:11 PM »


No, I have never made a full blown tutorial. Maybe some day I will. I am going to upload some info on mating radii  in the next month or so.

Well, get on the stick, kid!   :)

Offline CharlesWilson

  • Posts: 458
Re: Butterfly Style Dining Room Table
« Reply #10 on: March 13, 2009, 07:57 PM »
Here is a link to the pdf file:

Butterfly Style Dining Room Table

I have put together a message with the pdf file content here (using links into Flickr for the photos). It should be a bit easier to navigate through.



A Butterfly Dining Room Table With Two Pair of Wings (Leaves)

By Charles Wilson  (charles.wilson@snet.net)

It all started with Jerry Work?s Getting the Most From the Festool Domino Machine. In it Jerry described the construction of a Butterfly Leaf table, and indicated how by using a number of  simple construction techniques, and applying the Domino machine to its construction, this stunning table could be fashioned. I used this as a starting point for the dining room table I created for my son.
After doing some extensive research on the internet, I stumbled upon a commercial offering of a Butterfly Leaf table with more than one leaf, and challenged myself to figure out how I could design a table in which the butterfly leaves are stowed in separate compartments of the frame, but can be joined together after being deployed.
After identifying a design that seemed to be workable, the materials were purchased and after allowing the boards to adjust to the shop environment, construction began. Sapele was chosen as the wood for the table top as well as for the legs. The skirt was made from Lacewood. Hard maple was used for the frame and the shop built sliding mechanism.


I followed Jerry's recipe for using the guide rails and the MFK700 to cut dovetail slots for the table skirts to slide into:


The MFK700 was also used as a horizontal router to put male dovetails on the skirts. Note that the wooden wedge is my micro-height adjustment mechanism for getting the male dovetails just "right".


Here we see the skirt and table top together after machining:


Fine Woodworking published an article in July/August 1987 by Jeremiah de Rham entitled "Extension Tables, Their design and construction" in which a number of shop made sliding mechanisms were described. I decided to use the Block/Washer T-system described there, but used a different method of fabrication from the ones suggested. I machined a shallow channel in a long strip represented by the piece on the left, and then glued it to the main body of the slide piece and a dado was cut to form the notch in which the washer rides.


The washer is attached to a block that is fastened to one piece of the slide, and rides in the other half of the slide.




A mock-up of the butterfly deployment mechanism was hogged together in order to identify the locations of the pivot and support points needed in the frame.




The frame was assembled with dovetails at the locations of the points indicated by the mock-up. I was just a little bit surprised (and disappointed) when I found out that one set of support locations was off by about a half an inch! As you can see, those dovetails are not being used, and the support is actually mounted to the bottom of the frame. The wooden support for the leaves swivels on a metal rod, and is attached to the leaves within a dovetail type channel formed by the two blocks on either side of it screwed into the leaf. Both leaves are able to slide toward the center of the frame after they are deployed.




Keyhole slots were made on the sides of the frame to allow these blocks to be placed there when one of the leaves is deployed. These blocks support a skirt associated with the leaf so that the bare frame is covered. Since the grain direction of the skirt is perpendicular to that of the leaf, its width will not vary with seasonal changes while that of the leaf does vary.


The skirt piece sits on these supports below. It is held in place by the deployed leaf.


The legs were fashioned as two assemblies; one for each end of the table. Each leg is fastened to the supporting structure with twelve 10mm x 50mm dominos.


Each leg assembly is fastened to its table top with 22 pocket hole screws.


As these pictures will show, I wasn"t positively sure everything would be supported adequately without a fifth leg, so I made a temporary one and fastened it to the center of the frame. The table appears to be quite rigid, even without the extra appendage, but until it has had a little more service experience, I won"t be removing it.

Here is the table with all leaves stowed. The width is 42" and the length is 68" when closed. The table edge was sculpted with a few router passes, and smoothed with sanding blocks shaped to the contour. (Next time I will invoke the Festool solution to sanding custom profiles.) I brought out the grain with an oil finish and sealed it with shellac. The finish used on the table top is Behlens Rock Hard Tabletop finish, applied as directed by Per and Bob Swenson. (I want to thank them both for talking me through the rescue operations that were required to repair surface flaws caused by my carelessness.)

There was a bit of a delay in finishing this project, as I broke my hip in early January of this year. That event gave the finish a lot more time to cure before polishing began, so it definitely was rock-hard by the time I got to polishing it.


Here is the table with one leaf deployed. The length is now 84".


Here it is with both leaves deployed, and the skirts in place. Length is now 100"


The length is now 100", and it easily fills the room up.  


« Last Edit: September 21, 2009, 10:32 AM by CharlesWilson »
Charles Wilson

Offline Deke

  • Posts: 242
Re: Butterfly Style Dining Room Table
« Reply #11 on: March 14, 2009, 08:25 AM »
Wow is about all I can say. If I may speak for newbies and home hobby types learning their way through things work like this can at first make one say, "Who am I kidding?", but after a moment realize that it is always good to have something to aspire to. Thank you very much for showing us this.

Online neilc

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Re: Butterfly Style Dining Room Table
« Reply #12 on: March 14, 2009, 09:28 AM »
Charles -

That table and walk-through is outstanding.  Thank you for sharing it in such detail.

What is the finish?  It really pops.

neil

Offline CharlesWilson

  • Posts: 458
Re: Butterfly Style Dining Room Table
« Reply #13 on: March 14, 2009, 10:04 PM »
The finish is Behlens Rock Hard Table Top Varnish.  Per Swenson describes it in great detail in:

Sanding Bar Top
« Last Edit: March 14, 2009, 10:06 PM by CharlesWilson »
Charles Wilson

Offline Dave Ronyak

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Re: Butterfly Style Dining Room Table
« Reply #14 on: March 19, 2009, 11:13 PM »
WOW, what an AWESOME table, Charles!!  Thanks for documenting its design and construction so well, too.   Your choices of woods and finish look great.

Dave R.
Friends, family and Festools make for a good retirement.  PCs...I'm not so sure.