Author Topic: A kitchen 100 years older than the USA  (Read 1207 times)

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Online woodbutcherbower

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A kitchen 100 years older than the USA
« on: September 22, 2022, 05:01 PM »
No pictures yet because I haven't built it - but I accepted a commission today to build a kitchen in a local country farmhouse which was built in 1676 - exactly 100 years before the USA existed. I've spent a lifetime working on old buildings, but this is on another level. Roof and ceiling structure beams made using recovered oak from sunken Tudor-period Royal Navy battleships, and walls almost 3 feet thick, made from 2-ton stones quarried 50 miles away, cut up using 2-man iron stone saws working at a cut rate of 12" per hour, then dragged to the site using teams of men, teams of horses, plus wooden sleds and small tree trunks which were used as rollers. I've worked on this building before and I thought I knew it pretty well, but this is the absolute dream job which I'll be starting in around 6-7 weeks from now. Most amazing of all is that when I was taking measurements last week, I discovered that this ancient building is 99.4% square, 98.2% plumb, and the flagstone floor only deviates 2 degrees from horizontal. The farmhouse is 3-storeys and 40 feet high, so those 2-ton stones and half-ton oak beams needed to be lifted up there somehow. No forklifts, no cranes. Steam engines were still a century away.

How did they do it? Just how? This might become an interesting thread for you colonial youngsters.

Pictures to follow at some point in the future. Just thought I'd casually drop by and whet your appetites..................
« Last Edit: September 22, 2022, 06:09 PM by woodbutcherbower »

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Offline Peter Halle

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Re: A kitchen 100 years older than the USA
« Reply #1 on: September 22, 2022, 05:31 PM »
As a fan of yours I totally look forward to your posts in this thread.  I have written before, I believe somewhere on this forum, (good luck searching thru all my posts to find it  [eek]), I love reading about working with wood in different countries and cultures than here in the US especially.  Working on such a home should once again be a test of your skills - Godspeed!

Peter

Online woodbutcherbower

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Re: A kitchen 100 years older than the USA
« Reply #2 on: September 22, 2022, 06:04 PM »
As a fan of yours I totally look forward to your posts in this thread.  I have written before, I believe somewhere on this forum, (good luck searching thru all my posts to find it  [eek]), I love reading about working with wood in different countries and cultures than here in the US especially.  Working on such a home should once again be a test of your skills - Godspeed!

Peter

Thankyou as always for your kind words, Peter. I shall try not to disappoint.

Offline Peter Halle

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Re: A kitchen 100 years older than the USA
« Reply #3 on: September 22, 2022, 06:53 PM »
I hope my post didn't come across the wrong way.  Don't worry about disappointing me.  I'm easy.  I love posts where members show their work.  Especially in challenging or different situations.

Only ones to worry about disappointing are you and your client.

Peter

Online smorgasbord

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Re: A kitchen 100 years older than the USA
« Reply #4 on: September 22, 2022, 08:58 PM »
The farmhouse is 3-storeys and 40 feet high, so those 2-ton stones and half-ton oak beams needed to be lifted up there somehow. No forklifts, no cranes. Steam engines were still a century away.

How did they do it? Just how? This might become an interesting thread for you colonial youngsters.

Compound pulleys have existed for centuries - IIRC legend has it that Archimedes used a large compound pulley to move a ship by himself. But, I'm just spit-balling here.

Online Cheese

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Re: A kitchen 100 years older than the USA
« Reply #5 on: September 22, 2022, 10:42 PM »
Thankyou as always for your kind words, Peter. I shall try not to disappoint.

Guaranteed, you'll not disappoint...just post it like it is. My God, we post house renovations from the 20's, 30's, 40's, 50's and speak as to how out dated the methods and materials are...you are going to post the bones of a building that was built 300 years ago...God's speed.

Offline bobtskutter

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Re: A kitchen 100 years older than the USA
« Reply #6 on: September 23, 2022, 05:57 AM »

How did they do it? Just how? This might become an interesting thread for you colonial youngsters.


The same way the Egyptians built the pyramids, the aliens did it for them  [big grin] [big grin] [big grin]

I'm really looking forward to seeing this.

Regards
Bob

Offline mino

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Re: A kitchen 100 years older than the USA
« Reply #7 on: September 23, 2022, 07:11 AM »
Wonderful job to have indeed. Congratz!

... no cranes ...
Cranes were certainly used. They were a thing in Egypt, more than 5 millenia ago.

We tend to think how our forefathers did not have today's tech. Sure. But they had their time's tech. Mostly human or animal powered so less "eficient" on manpower but often more efficient on energy per se.


I would also argue that is no "Farmhouse". Whoever lived from farming could not afford such a house construction. IF he could, his taxes would be immediately raised to "rectify" the situation or he would use the income to acquire some nobility level first.

So either way it would fit as Manor house or thereabouts in my view.
When The Machine has no brains, use yours.