Author Topic: [Project 29] Small CNC Rolling Cart  (Read 1205 times)

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Offline mattbyington

  • Posts: 693
[Project 29] Small CNC Rolling Cart
« on: December 30, 2019, 11:10 PM »
Hey team,

So I have just recently purchased a small CNC machine. Specifically the Nomad 883 Pro from Carbide3D. About a month ago. I've learned Fusion 360 (I am still very much a beginner, but it's at least fun now, rather than frustrating like in the beginning).

I'm not going to get into fabrication of parts very much, this is a small (but very precise) CNC machine capable of an 8" by 8" work area. So obviously not good for making a whole lot, I'm mostly doing it to learn Fusion, learn CAD and CAM, create tool paths, et cetera.

Anyways - so, I'm in the process of building out a little cart for it so that it matches my work bench.

Matt


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Offline mattbyington

  • Posts: 693
Re: [Project 29] Small CNC Rolling Cart
« Reply #1 on: December 30, 2019, 11:13 PM »



Offline jobsworth

  • Posts: 6723
  • Festool Baby.....
Re: [Project 29] Small CNC Rolling Cart
« Reply #2 on: December 30, 2019, 11:14 PM »
For someone who started posting here talking about how to save space and be able to park yer car in the garage etc. You sure are buying a lot of tools and filling that garage up.  [not worthy] [not worthy]

Offline mattbyington

  • Posts: 693
Re: [Project 29] Small CNC Rolling Cart
« Reply #3 on: December 30, 2019, 11:15 PM »
@jobsworth to be fair my car *is* still in there ;)

Offline mattbyington

  • Posts: 693
Re: [Project 29] Small CNC Rolling Cart
« Reply #4 on: December 30, 2019, 11:17 PM »

Offline tallgrass

  • Posts: 978
Re: [Project 29] Small CNC Rolling Cart
« Reply #5 on: December 31, 2019, 12:18 AM »
You are doing great work. I have a ton of cnc machines, of a personal and commercial nature. While your cart is functional, may I suggest that you add mass to the cart. I am not suggesting you redesign it, just that mass helps a great deal in dealing with the vibrations these machines make. Mass and stiffness are your friend when dealing with this kind of thing. Think of these things like musical instruments, in that they will want to resonate, however in this world , resonance is not your friend. Anything that will increase the dampening of the machine and the stand would be a good thing. you do not want the cart to become a resonance box of sorts. I would also suggest that the wheels should be of the kind that retract. So that the cart sits firmly on the floor, even if on rubber feet. When it comes to machines like this mas is your friend. At least in the static components. Resonance is to be avoided, where ever possible. Please do not take these as criticisms. Just observations. As usual your work seems to be thoughtful and well executed. Just some thoughts.

Offline mattbyington

  • Posts: 693
Re: [Project 29] Small CNC Rolling Cart
« Reply #6 on: December 31, 2019, 01:09 AM »
@tallgrass thanks brother so much for the feedback! Great to have someone who knows about CNCs comment.

I’ll fix it up next week and send some more pictures!!

Matt


Offline simonh

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  • Posts: 153
  • Hobbyist / Maker of the VCS-R
Re: [Project 29] Small CNC Rolling Cart
« Reply #7 on: December 31, 2019, 04:51 AM »
I have a Nomad with all the accessories. It's a great little machine and can mill anything I've thrown at it. I've made numerous jigs for the workshop. Cut 1/2" aluminium sheet twice the size of the bed and flipped it to mill the other half. Cut 2" acrylic blocks in a flower shape. Milled some sockets on the end of some legs for a woodworking project with them sticking out the front. I even milled some extra holes in a 1/2" steel bar that I needed precisely locating. Now Winston Moy is working at Carbide 3d his videos on YouTube are invaluable compared to the information around a couple of years ago. It will be far more useful than you can imagine as you learn the possibilities of Fusion and work holding.

Looks like you are off to a good start with the CT-SYS vacuum and holder. I think I might copy you stand as I spend hours sat on the floor with mine on the bottom shelf of a cupboard! Only suggestion I would make is to make the top surface into a shallow slide out open drawer that the Nomad sits on as after awhile there are buckets of chips sat underneath the machine where the Y axis motor is and an easy way to clean them out without lugging the machine off the top would be good.



P.S. A VacSys and an hour in Fusion and you can make a nice vacuum clamping table :D

P.P.S Using the CT-SYS blower rather than vacuum can work very well when working with aluminum or other materials where sucking up the chips isn't as effective as just blowing them out of slots.

Anyway I won't hijack your thread, if you get stuck with anything Nomad CNC related just drop me a message and I'll do what I can to help. Or, look me up on Instagram as simon.huntington as I tend to post projects on there.
« Last Edit: December 31, 2019, 05:22 AM by simonh »
-Simon

Offline tallgrass

  • Posts: 978
Re: [Project 29] Small CNC Rolling Cart
« Reply #8 on: January 01, 2020, 07:44 PM »
Here is something you can do. take a laser pointer, a mirror  and a target. Mount a mirror on top of your cnc. Use a sticker or some such technique. So that it is temporary. Aim the laser pointer at the mirror such that it reflects on a wall. Place your target at this point. You can do this for your cart as well. Now run your machine " a part g code" and look at the pattern on you laser targets.  While some of this "noise" will not be transmitted to your part, some will. This will affect your surface finish and in some cases actual tolerances.