Author Topic: Wago wire connector nuts  (Read 3027 times)

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Offline six-point socket II

  • Posts: 1363
  • formerly @the_black_tie_diyer
Re: Wago wire connector nuts
« Reply #60 on: July 28, 2020, 05:24 AM »

Thats the best case scenario obviously. If you ask 10 people if they can provide this documentation, 0.25 will be able to hand you something.

Will most employees in larger companies know that when they bring their personal coffee maker, charging device or whatever, they should send a notice to maintenance and they will test it, and put a little sticker on it that says tested and when the next test should be performed. As they are reminded to do it by e-mail or during "work safety/accident prevention class" hold by the appointed occupational health and safety "officer"/appointee once a year.


Oliver, I think you should just ditch the idle chatter on Festoolownersgroup and engage in a 1000 page tome on the ins & outs of home inspections in Germany. If you focused on presenting that to the proper clientele you could make a million.  [big grin] [big grin]

I also love the 10 people statement...

I totally understand the frustration with the personal device thing, I believe it started when ISO was first established.

From an engineering perspective I understand the issue. You don't want engineers approving discrepant product based on non-certified measuring instruments. That's the reason personal measuring instruments must be verified every year and have a certified tag attached.

But coffee makers...really?

The funny part is, this is just one little part. And if I may say so, it's not exactly a highly complicated matter. If you want to know why they had all the trouble building that new BER airport. Look no further. There is a standard/code for everything. But if you don't have supervision, and don't give the people working for you the whole picture something grotesque like a fire proof/fire resistant wall being build from masonry instead of the required concrete, and wall plugs being used that are not suitable/rated to withstand fire happens. Or nylon wall plugs (for walls) being used to mount cable trays (holding critical infrastructure) to the ceiling that should have been mounted with anchors that are permitted to/ rated for hold/holding such a (pulling) load and also fire resistant. (....)

Speaking of the coffee maker, you're looking at it from the wrong perspective. It's not like bringing "personal tools". It's a safety concern (electric shock, fire ...). At my old/former employer (formerly DAX noted) EVERYTHING electrical was tested and given the sticker if it passed. Chargers, coffee makers, extension cords, beamers, lights, stereos (...). They outsourced this to a maintenance service provider, and you would see tech guys and gals for a week or more straight going from office to office, cubicle to cubicle, tea kitchen ... testing everything, documenting it, putting a sticker on it. That was like one big Fluke advertising campaign. Everyone had the big appliance tester over their shoulder, and one of those yellow tool boxes with some basic tools and necessary adaptors, test leads ...

This will be getting bigger once they raise the number of available car chargers.

Once they were done, the next techie group came to check the fire detection system.

Then there was a tech team doing nothing else but bring people phones, switching/assigning numbers, keep the directory up to date.

And don't forget the team that tested/checked and put up the Christmas lighting.

I have no idea how this is handled in the US, but in Germany this type of industry/commercial service is booming. One company, teams for everything: service/maintenance related. From green keeping, to house keeping, security, maintenance. All having color coded/ in relation to the job, "uniforms". It's impressive, as they bring and maintain their own machinery as well, when they are contracted. This is one of these companies: https://www.wisag.de


Kind regards,
Oliver
Kind regards,
Oliver

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Offline six-point socket II

  • Posts: 1363
  • formerly @the_black_tie_diyer
Re: Wago wire connector nuts
« Reply #61 on: July 28, 2020, 07:51 AM »
Just to put a "picture" to the book part.



Testing according to/ as set out by VDE in accordance with: Operational Safety Ordinance BetrSichV; Technical Regulations on Industrial Safety and Health TRBS; German Social Accident Insurance (DGUV) Instruction/Rule 3. <- That's the part about checking any and all electrical installations, appliances/ especially, but not limited to, tools used commercially and/or by employees

This book explains how to do it, it features excerpts from standards/code, but it's really just focussed from one viewpoint/ at one overall subject.


Kind regards,
Oliver
Kind regards,
Oliver

"... . Say yes to stuff, and it will take you interesting places." - Anne Richards, CEO Fidelity International

Offline DeformedTree

  • Posts: 832
Re: Wago wire connector nuts
« Reply #62 on: July 28, 2020, 03:37 PM »
But coffee makers...really?
I’ve worked in big Silicon Valley corporations for >25years. All have had rules prohibiting personal devices like coffee makers...and some actually have had enforcement (eg confiscating a tea kettle).

Right, the norm in any company is no bringing in of anything.  Inspection has nothing to do with it, they don't want anyone bringing any devices in period.  Even stuff bought/owned by the company is very limited, thus things like microwaves, and kettles get limited or removed.   They don't want items there that the company didn't bring in, and of that bought/provided by the company they want as minimal as possible.

Doesn't even apply to just electronics, but basically almost anything.  You bring yourself in and not much else.

On the flip side, if everyone gets sac'd that day, you don't have to grab anything.

Offline Bob D.

  • Posts: 1681
Re: Wago wire connector nuts
« Reply #63 on: July 29, 2020, 04:21 AM »
"Once the inspector inspects and signs off on the work, the liability is on the town/city/county,"

I'm not sure that is true, at least here in NJ. And I base that on having taken the classes to become a code and sub-code official in NJ in 2010.
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