Author Topic: Restoration Hardware Table  (Read 6882 times)

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Offline chrismorrow

  • Posts: 89
Restoration Hardware Table
« on: January 17, 2012, 09:50 PM »
I've been asked to build a table.  Normally, this wouldn't be a problem.  But the table in question happens to be the Restoration Hardware trestle table.  Please check out the legs.  How in the world does one make legs like this?  Any suggestions? 

http://www.restorationhardware.com/catalog/product/product.jsp?productId=prod1596003&categoryId=cat1653016

Any suggestions would be greatly appreciated.

Chris
Kapex, Domino DF 500, LR32, RO 125, T15, Ti15, TS 55, OF 1400, CT MINI, MFT/3, Carvex PS 420, SYSRoll 100, SORT 9, SORT 12, Centrotec Installers Set, SYS-Toolbox.

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Offline Michael Kellough

  • Posts: 4326
Re: Restoration Hardware Table
« Reply #1 on: January 17, 2012, 10:26 PM »
The table is 30" high so the legs are about 8-1/2" at the widest. In a zoomed detail photo you can see that the legs are built up from three pieces. I'd get some old recycled stock and laminate it (I'd make it several inches longer than final) then square up the blank and layout the lines on two adjacent sides and go at it with the bandsaw. I'd keep the very ends (surplus length) the full size until all the cuts and filing are done on all sides. They'll be useful for clamping etc. while you go at it with rasps etc.

Offline chrismorrow

  • Posts: 89
Re: Restoration Hardware Table
« Reply #2 on: January 17, 2012, 11:09 PM »
Thanks for the quick reply Michael.  I'm not sure my band saw will allow that much stock in it (I think it will only handle about 7").  Do you think I could pull off the molding look on the TS?  I could probably find a BS to use for the larger rounded part.

Chris
Kapex, Domino DF 500, LR32, RO 125, T15, Ti15, TS 55, OF 1400, CT MINI, MFT/3, Carvex PS 420, SYSRoll 100, SORT 9, SORT 12, Centrotec Installers Set, SYS-Toolbox.

Offline fritter63

  • Retailer
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  • Posts: 1399
Re: Restoration Hardware Table
« Reply #3 on: January 18, 2012, 12:29 AM »
This is why I stick to the Arts & Crafts style...  [cool]

What Michael said, I think it's just bandsawed.

Offline Kev

  • Posts: 7652
Re: Restoration Hardware Table
« Reply #4 on: January 18, 2012, 12:32 AM »
That looks like a job for the world's biggest spindle moulder  [big grin]

Realistically though, once you start with two  200 x 200 mm (or bigger) pieces, you have 8 faces to cut in an identical pattern of passes. You could make these passes over a saw table and/or a router table.

The more accurate fine passes you can make will reduce the sanding on the larger curved part of the profile and improve uniformity.

Anyway - that'd be my approach. I think there's to much room for error using a bandsaw to shape it.

I'd play with a profile experimentally on a piece of stock ... max depth of the profile looks to be about 40~45 mm, so the experimentation would be easy(ish).

Kev.

Offline Tim Raleigh

  • Posts: 3560
    • Oakville Cabinetry
Re: Restoration Hardware Table
« Reply #5 on: January 18, 2012, 07:33 AM »
I've been asked to build a table.  Normally, this wouldn't be a problem.  But the table in question happens to be the Restoration Hardware trestle table.  Please check out the legs.  How in the world does one make legs like this?  Any suggestions? 


Chris:
That's a nice looking table.
Are you going to make it out of pine like the one in the picture?
I agree with Michael, looks like the legs were cut out with a band saw. If you don't have one big enough and you are using pine a bow saw might work for the curves. I have never tried it. It would be a workout but you would get that hand cut rough look of the legs.
I wouldn't use a TS55 for the profiles, the cuts would look too clean, unless that is the look you are going for.
Good luck, great project.
Tim

Offline chrismorrow

  • Posts: 89
Re: Restoration Hardware Table
« Reply #6 on: January 18, 2012, 09:36 AM »
Thanks guys for the suggestions.  I think I will go the bandsaw route.  Maybe I'll post progress pics on here.  Not sure about the wood yet.  I think pine wood look great, but the buyer is thinking about mahogany.
Kapex, Domino DF 500, LR32, RO 125, T15, Ti15, TS 55, OF 1400, CT MINI, MFT/3, Carvex PS 420, SYSRoll 100, SORT 9, SORT 12, Centrotec Installers Set, SYS-Toolbox.

Offline Scott in Bend

  • Posts: 240
Re: Restoration Hardware Table
« Reply #7 on: January 18, 2012, 10:04 AM »
Cool table...I would start with a full height 6x6 vertical square post and apply the "chess piece" part as stacked mitered moldings.  Kind of like building up multiple profiles on a mantel.
« Last Edit: January 18, 2012, 11:21 AM by Scott in San Diego »

Offline Michael Kellough

  • Posts: 4326
Re: Restoration Hardware Table
« Reply #8 on: January 18, 2012, 10:07 AM »
On second thought, you'd need a bigger bandsaw for some of those cuts (straight cross cuts near the middle) so you might need to do as Kev suggested as well. Rehearse all the cuts after layout and decide which ones will have to be made with something other than the bandsaw. Those cuts should probably be done before going to the bandsaw. A crosscut sled on the table saw might be best. But, a good sharp handsaw will work too, especially if you use wood without knots.

Offline RL

  • Posts: 3040
Re: Restoration Hardware Table
« Reply #9 on: January 18, 2012, 11:01 AM »
Cool table...I would start with a 6x6 vertical square post and apply the "chess piece" part as stacked mitered moldings.  Kind of like building up multiple profiles on a mantel.

That's exactly what I was thinking. I would put a dowel down the centre to keep everything aligned.

46498-0

Offline Brice Burrell

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Re: Restoration Hardware Table
« Reply #10 on: January 18, 2012, 04:19 PM »
Cool table...I would start with a full height 6x6 vertical square post and apply the "chess piece" part as stacked mitered moldings.  Kind of like building up multiple profiles on a mantel.

I like the idea of stacked pieces.  You could skip the mitering and just run the pieces on all four side in a router table/shaper.  Of course the advantage of mitering is you could buy stock moldings that were a close match, you'd have a lot less milling/routing to do then. 
Check out my new blog, The Green and Dark Blue Blog.

Offline Tim Raleigh

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    • Oakville Cabinetry
Re: Restoration Hardware Table
« Reply #11 on: January 19, 2012, 05:58 PM »
I like the idea of stacked pieces.  You could skip the mitering and just run the pieces on all four side in a router table/shaper.  Of course the advantage of mitering is you could buy stock moldings that were a close match, you'd have a lot less milling/routing to do then. 

How you eventually do this, stacked or band saw etc. it will be cool to see how it turns out.
Tim